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Episode 96 · 5 months ago

TOP GUN: MAVERICK (2022) with Editor Eddie Hamilton Part Two

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent continue their conversation with Eddie Hamilton about his work on Top Gun: Maverick (2022). They also discuss what may be coming out pretty soon...

So parth. Hello, nice to see you, trendster. Long time no see. You're looking well. What have you been eating? Thank you. I had a little. Do you know the friendly's ice cream cones that you can get like shop right? Sure, I can't say I know exactly what you're talking about, but I'm aware of shop right and friendlies. It's friendlies no more, I guess not if they're still doing storebots of like that, but I feel like all the friendly is in my life have disappeared. Yes, all of the friendlies I know, which are two, close down. Remember going to friendly he's as a kid? Remember like that. I did dream and it had like the reese's cups as the ears and I like mm eyes, like there was a simple, simpler time. My mom would always get the strawberry fripple shake. That's that's just a fun little fact to know about Serbing marate. You know, I can't imagine like getting a meal from there, though. My parents must have really been like taking one for the team. Did they sell food? Yeah, of course, the grilled cheese and chicken strip, wow jazz. That was not a part of my childhood. But there was also just like an ice cream counter at the front. You could just go for ice cream. That's that's where I went. I don't think I've ever been in. Can you go inside of a friendly? So of course I I feel like whenever we would like, it would be like the last baseball game of the season or something, and then everywhere, every time, that's when you like go out for pizza or something, but when you're really young, I feel like they would take us to friendlies. But anyways, do you know the drumsticks? At least like the ice cream drum sticks you can get at Costco? Sure, for the sake of conversation, sure. Anyways, for the listeners at home, if you know what I'm talking about, friendlies makes smaller versions of that and you can buy them at shop. Right and after dinner I had one of those and it was a delicious little dessert. Treat about you try? What have you had? Haven't thought about friendlies in a while. Me and friend of the show, Jackson Clark, drove a little bit to Jamesburg to play disc golf and before we played we realize you want to Tacos, and really the only interesting thing I can say is that when ordering the tacos, the two mad were just from it was called Maria's Tacorea. It was it was the nearest eatery. We were just desperate and in an unknown territory, and so it had four point five stars and like those those are pretty high marks. When ordering the tacos. The two options with like the toppings besides your meat selection. You could get it with like onions and slantro which was called like the authentic way, or you could get it the other way, which had, let us in tomato and cream or whatever, and Jackson got the authentic way, which sounded interesting, but I was like I kind of want all of that stuff, and so I said, can I have it with like everything on it, and I think you just interpret it as I want. Everything is in just like this, the lettuce and and the tomato, blah, blah. The second option and on the little screen comes up Gringo Taco, three dollars, and then that you know what a Green Goo is? Yes, yes, and so I think like they're like, Oh, here's the authentic and this is the White Guy Taco, and I ordered three White Guy Tacos and they were really just like rubbing it in my face, and so I the last thing I had to be discriminated against. It was a nice change of pace. I guess I know what it's like for the red the the rest...

...of the world. Now, who isn't like white and middle class and straight? Where this? Is there any other way? I'm privileged or I feel Al Mail. There you go. But yes, I had three Gringo tacos. In conclusion, they were a CC well, with that being said, should we cue the intro because we got something awesome to cut to, don't we? Yeah, it's there, our second half of a conversation with someone. Should we play some up gun music? Yeah, we did dangerous on last time. You said it last week but I didn't play it, but this week I'll play it just for you. Try. I appreciate them watching. The problem is that that's not going to be what's playing underneath us right now, and I can I can only sing the that's they play that song four times and twenty minutes. It's it's true, and it's awesome every time. And it's the same though, I guess, but also it's just literally the same part of the song. Welcome back to craft services, where we talk about the movies each week. We talked about a film and hopefully I have a crewmember of that film to talk with us about their experience working on the picture. This week it's actually the second week of the same interview from last week. Who Did we talk with? Dry We talked with Eddie Hamilton, the editor of the film, and he also edited such films as Kick Ass, Xmen, first class, MR impossible follow out and, of course, our film for today's top gun, Maverick. Yeah, know, like it was just like kind of awesome and epic and he gives a lot of cool stories and information. But like, if you don't want to listen to it, guys, you can just stop here. You can be honest. Do you prefer the first half from last week or this or this? Maybe your biased because anyone, you don't want to say the other one, because now listeners of this one would just skip to that unless they've heard it already and they're just hankering for the second for to complete their completionists. Eddie Hamilton, completion is, honestly, having edited both parts already. I would say that both are kind of different beasts, but I would say that of the two, like maybe this one has more information that you'd want, but that they're both like interesting. I lived and also really listen to the first one because it's one of our, you know, bigger catches interview wise, and the first half was pretty was pretty light and Airy, and I remembered the second half being like some hard facts, lot top gun back and forth. Yeah, like, I don't know. Maybe he talks about some some suggestions the Tom Cruise gave that made it into the film. You know, maybe, I don't know. Maybe he talks about some scenes that were there. Maybe maybe it's about baby. I don't know how covid affected the editing of the film. Who knows? Maybe we get into a little mission talk towards the end. Maybe knows? Maybe I don't know. Like like I guess we are the only ones that would know. Then, Eddie Hamilton and Eddie Hamilton, he lived it. Yeah, now he's done his best to forget it. It was it went pretty horribly for him. Yeah, I know we had. He thought that he that like his kid, was like into tension and that he had to like facetime the principle or something, and so...

...really he was shocked when he was getting interviewed about the film, but he was really nice enough to continue and talk for like an hour, which is pretty interesting. But anyways, I'm gonna just let this speak for itself. I guess we'll see you on the other side, guys. Yeah, if you want to hear parthen I more listen to the entirety of the interview and then just catch up with us at the end. All right, so what are we playing as our music? We done take my breath away. Do we do it again? Do we do wait, yes, you should do yeah, be I mean, in the light of them playing it so redundantly four times over the course of twenty minutes, I say let's needle drop what we just did. Five minutes ago. Take my breath. I talked about planes. The first like montage of Tom Cruise, just like obliterating all the new recruits, is really cool and like one of my favorite sequences in the movie. If you get just talk about assembling that together, because so croad. Oh my God, yeah, it okay, so that sequence is about so the sequence where we use a won't get fooled again by the WHO is the bit that you're talking about with the pushups and stuff. So net at the moment in the movie it's about four minutes ten seconds, okay, and then there's a sequence with maverick and rooster directly after that, right, but let's let's discount that because that's its own thing. Okay, so let's talk about the sequence where we use the WHO. Now that probably started off about so it's four minutes ten. It probably started off about. I'm going to you know, the long version was fifteen minutes. All right, so just fifteen minutes is very long and very boring, but that was when I first put it together. That's probably how long it was. And then we got it down to twelve and then we got it down to eight and then we got it down to six. So I managed to get it to less than half and we we couldn't. We tried all kinds of different pieces of music, but it took a very long time. And when you're compressing a sequence like that, you're literally you're looking through every shot and you're going, is this the best shot? And and because you're trying to get it really tight and exciting. Now I don't know if you guys have seen days of thunder, the top gun motes, the the Tom Cruise movie about race cars, but there's a sequence in that which is a montage set to gimme someone Lovin, and it's a similar kind of montage where he's trying. He's racing around all different tracks and he's talking to Richard Val. What's his name? Richard Devout? No, Labert of all, Robert Devout. Sorry. Yeah, so he's racing around all these tracks, he's talking to Robert Devout and I remember watching that scene a couple of times and thinking I want it to be as tight and as fun as this, and it was. So it just the so much little pieces of story and character and, you know, getting the pushups and then rooster and then these other guys doing the Selfie and all this. It just it really was a challenge to get it down. And but what happens is you compress and you compressed and then the shots that aren't as good kind of pop out because there's not room for them. So you just keep squeezing the sequence down. And what's interesting is we got to the last week of our final mix. We had a seven week sound mix on this movie, which is very, very long. The sound mixer that we used, Mark Taylor, had before the lockdown the last film he did was...

...no time to die, which is, you know, nearly a threehour movie and our film is two as ten. And they they only took three weeks to mix, no time to die, and we took seven weeks, which kind of shows you how complex and how detail our sound work was. And Tom Cruise does not compromise on the quality of his movies. He wanted top gun maverick to be Sonic Lee and visually, obviously, but when we were sound mixing, sonically perfect from the beginning to the end, so that the moment you hear the very first notes of how old fualtemire's top gun theme to the very end of the end credits, it is a an exquisite work of art sonically that has not been compromised at all. You are literally watching something which is the state of the art, with no compromise, with the very best people and the very best technology that exists today, which is part of the reason why when you go and the sound kind of knocks you, knocks your socks off, but it doesn't tie your ears out. There's enough variety in it, and that is so difficult to get right. I promise you to find the balance between dialog, sound effects and music so that you feel there was a lot of texture through the movie and variation. Anyway, we got to the final week of the sound mix and we were watching that sequence and we had not we didn't use the WHO at that point and the the film that sequence was about six minutes long and we all looked at each other over like it's still not tight enough and not exciting enough and fun enough, is it? And and we were all hoping we were going to get away with it, but we didn't. And so Tom said, I think we need to take another swing at this, guys. So on the last week of the mix, that we two days before we do to finish, we took that real off, carried on working on the rest of the movie and then I went and I cut out another, you know, minute and a half out of the scene and then we tried, won't get fooled again, by the WHO, which we had done months earlier. But because the sequence was so much longer, it didn't work. Anyway, we got it to work and it's got a great intro and it's got Roger dultry screaming when Maverick splits the two jets and you just go this is awesome. And even if you are not familiar with the track, you go this is awesome, you know, and even if you think it's Dad Rock, there's a point in the sequence where you're like, note, this is awesome, I don't I'm going with this. And and so I remember spending another four or five hours just compressing the sequence even more and taking shots out and making even snappier than it was, even faster, even faster because, you know, like when Maverick shoots down the push the guys who are, you know, take the Selfie, we used to have to exterior shots of a jets for each kill and we were like no, it's got to be once. I would like pop out one and the would just be one shot kill. Then the next guy, one shot killed, dead, push ups, and then then the gag is funny at you know, because it's just snappier. So that that literally happened in like the last day of just before we finish the movie. We got that working. So it's a very good question to ask. Path but we got there and it went from a scene where we knew it wasn't great to a scene where we were like now this is working, now this is awesome. But it took, you know, to the year to get it there. I'm not exaggerating, a year every day. So we got it that good. With that conversation about music. I know on the mission movies you don't score with, you don't edit with Tep Music, and I was wondering on this movie did you and also when you actually were getting the real music? Those going to be in the movie? I mean, what was that like, because you've got Harold Fault of myre, Lauren Bouth Lady Gaga and Hans Zimmer All. Yeah, yeah, it obviously this is a dream come true for me. I've never worked with hands em before, or howlerful Tomile, obviously, and so to meet them and to collaborate with them...

...was a dream come true, and I'm not exaggerating. It was I would pinch myself going into the studio to listen to what they've done. Now it took a very long time to get the score working on this movie. We tried what we tried? Hundreds of needle drops, right source tracks, but we also tried many, many, many variations of score. It's very difficult to get music to work alongside the sound of jets. Okay, quite a lot of the time, what we ended up doing is using quite long chords. So when Maverick does the Canyon run, for example, the beginning, now actually we have we have music kind of all the way through. It's kind of going to get and then these long chords that play, and long cords can play over kind of percussive jet sounds without fighting the frequencies. They have a kind of intense emotionality to them which sits alongside the visuals and the sounds of the jets so that you you are you're almost in awe, like the way the pilots are in the tack room. You know, the music is kind of selling that sense of awe of what Maverick is achieving. But it was it, you know, it was again like everything it the bar was set so high tom did. Tom Wanted everything to just be amazing and if something didn't work we would try something else and it took a very, very long time to find the emotional the tone of the movie that worked. The Lady gargar track, the Cord progressions from her song hold my hand, we used very effectively, I think, for the love them in for the transition from Maverick and penny on the beach to the carrier deck. All that stuff and then you'll notice that when the pilots are being briefed about the mission, you hear Bom Bom, Bom, Bom, Bom, Bom, Bom, Bom Bom bum bum bum bum bum bum bum bum, bum bum bum bum, which is highway to the dangers I. So we're playing that very slowly. And then when they're stealing, when maverick and rooster steal a plane in the third act, you you hear the same kind of a a bet about it. So it's playing highway to the danger zone in a slightly different rhythm, which I love. I love that Q so much. And then we found this kind of quite dangerous sounding alarm sound for the enemy, Fiv Gen fighters, you know, which is like a siren, it's like a bomb kind of sound that we use whenever they appear. Yeah, but it was it was very it took ages. All the tracks in the bar, you know, we use David Bowie and then we use bang a gone by t rex and then later on we use slow ride by fog hat and then it's great balls of fire. All that stuff took you know, that to find the right combination of tracks that had the right emotion and playfulness and fun and it kind of sounds like a bar where you want to hang out. You know, it just took it. It took forever, but we got there. You know, that was the main thing. We just we just tried lots of stuff out and didn't compromise. So one of my favorite things about the structure is that you sort of expected to be at three act with the end being like the conclusion of the mission and like the success of the mission. And then, I love that essentially the last I don't know, twenty minutes or so, I was like an Adendum and like yeah, conscious of you were you to like deceiving the expectation of it ending or of like a traditional three ex structure. Well, listen, I love movies that do that. It's we're especially if you're loving the movie and then you just hextra thing. You just want more. And I remember very clearly when I saw...

...aliens and the drop ship lifts off from the planet. It's one of my favorite movies of all time. When the drop Shit, when Bishop rescues newt and Ripley and they knew, they knew the planet from orbit, and you think it's all fine and it's all over and then bishop gets written half by the Alien Queen and there's that extra fight sequence with that, with the power loader at the end. It is monstrously satisfying. It is so entertaining. You just love the movie for it and I remember when I read that that idea was always in the script and I remember thinking, Wow, if we can make this work, if we can pull this off, it is going to be so entertaining because it's what one this is a spoiler, massive, huge spoiler. One. It's a Tom Cat. It's an F fourteen Tom cat, which for every fan of the first movie, Trent, when you see the first movie you'll see what I mean. But that plane just looks cool. It just looks so cool. We have the aerial sort of a tomcat turning out the hangar and you're just going, oh, this is so good. It's a Tom Cat, it's maverick and it's kind of goose in the back and they're having this banter. So you're getting a taste of what it was like in the first movie with all the emotional stakes, the fact that it's goose's son and Maverick feels responsible, you know, and and doesn't want to take risks, and then it's rooster who has to say it's not the plane, it's pilot, you know, and roosters the one saying, come on, let's do this and and then you get this incredibly exciting dog fight at the end of the movie and then there's another guy who turns up and you think, oh, that toasts anyway. I won't spoil we end, but it's you know, we I. If you're loving the movie and you're with the characters, getting that little extra bonus at the end is just so satisfying and I love it when movies do that and I'm thrilled that you liked to Trent, I really am. I love it. So you spoken a lot about Tom Cruiser's influence on the movie, and you know he's the biggest movie star in the world and I was wondering what he's like to work with in the edit room and if there's any specific notes you remember him giving you that ended up having an effect in the movie. As we see it, he gives emotional notes. He doesn't give specific notes. Okay, very occasionally he'll say we should cut this shot of it earlier or whatever, but generally speaking his notes are I'm not feeling this in the film, you know, like I don't feel connected to maverick, I don't feel his relationship with penny. I don't feel the weight of the pressure on Maverick at this moment. Those are usually the notes we get and and he you know, these movies their subjective movies and and a lot of the film is told from Maverick's point of view. And most Tom cruise movies are subjective movies in that you are following a central protagonist and you're in his point of view almost all the way through the film, you know. And so most of his notes are you know, keep an eye on the on your connect your emotional attachments to the character. So in the bar scene where we meet all the characters in the bar, a lot of the time we're hinging around maverick in the foreground and we're making sure that things are being played from his point of view. So he's observing all the other pilots and he is, you know, when hangman comes up and says I'll have for more on the old timer, and you know, things like that. You're getting these these everything is kind of bouncing off maverick and you're seeing him watch brewster come in, and so most of the notes are are about about focusing the movie. Sometimes it's about comedy,...

...sometimes it can be about, you know, different ways to introduce a character whatever. One of the one of the really great notes he gave in the sound mix was the scene with maverick and penny in bed when they're talking about rooster, which is a critical scene for the audience to understand the choices that Mav has made and why rooster doesn't like him and how his relationship with Rooster's mother ended and all that. You, Tom watched this. Tom Watched the mix of that real and he said, you know, what we should do is we should be that dialogs too loud in there. We should actually turn the dialog down so that it's more intimate and the audience is leaning forward and having to really engage and listen to the dialog in this scene, and so you feel like it's an intimate conversation that that Mav is having with penny and with the audience. You know, a lot of the time when you're sound mixing on movies, the note is that can't hear the dialog, can't hear the dialog, turn the dialog up. You know, which is obviously crucially important, that you understand every line of dialog. It seems very basic, but when you've seen the film three hundred times, it's sometimes easy to think people can understand a line when actually they can't. So it's very important to get fresh ears on it and Tom would come in once or white a wee can listen to the movie, but he was absolutely right. So we we did another pass on the scene. We turned down the dialog and the music's very gentle in there. It's just very soft and emotional and intimate and we we got it working. Just another great note from Tom, you know, about how to get the audience invested further in the scene. That's that's happening. I'm sure it's especially hard to like mix the levels of dialog and determine what's loud enough when, like, you're listening with headphones, are in a controlled environment, and then you essentially need to do it for like what is going to be the lowest common denominator of the theater audio system throughout the world and an America. You know, yeah, it is difficult. I'm quite I've got a lot of experience of mixing on headphones and mixing at home and then putting it up in a theater. So I feel like I've got that down over the last like especially over the last like seven or eight years. I feel very confident. You know, mixing sound theatrically out of the avid media composed of timeline and then but you're right there. The lowest common dent dominant and the lowest common denominator of the theaters around the world. Now there's a most theaters are not optimal. They don't play the sound loud enough. It's both the Dolby fader is supposed to be at seven and most of the time most theaters play it at five point five or even for and it can be very disappointing when you go to a real world theater and it's just not how you mix the film, because it's got to have real punch, which is one of the reasons why, if you go to a dolby cinema or an imax cinema, you get that incredible sound intensity which you know we all work so hard to create so that it's at the right level and doesn't tie your ear drums out. It's a very good question, Trent, and something which we're all mindful of and really investment in the quality of projectors and sound systems is what's going to get audiences to buy movie tickets. So it's something which people who own cinemas should really take great care in the presentation of the movies, and I know that. You know, there are very few projectionists left in a lot of these multiplexes. They kind of run on autopilot, so people don't even check that the pictures in focus, sometimes all that there's even sound on the film. I remember when I went to see Pacific Rim there was just no dialog channel. So for twenty minutes I was like,...

...there's no dialog in this film and they said, Oh no, it's fine, it's supposed to just come out of the left and right. I said, guys, I'm a know, I work in the industry and I promise you there's supposed to be dialog in the sense of channel. And the center speaker had just totally blown in the theater and no one had said anything for a week. So everyone watching that film was just it was a disaster. Anyway, I'm you know, there's nothing you can do, apart from whenever I meet people who own cinemas, I try and remind them of the importance of high quality presentation, because it's you know, somebody should be checking every single screening of every film that happens in a cinema to make sure it's up to standard, because people have traveled all that way and they bought a ticket and they've got a babysitter and they're spending money on their smacks and they deserve the movie to be shown brilliantly. You know, I once saw screening of the shining and there was no dialog track where there's a booming score. It's very peculiar, very peculiar. It's heartbreaking them that happens that. The Pacific Rim screening was the worst though, the fact that the staff, the cinema stuff were like no, no, no, it's fine, it's supposed to sound and all the die. All you could hear was like bits of reverb coming out of the left and right in the surrounds. Was a disaster. I was heartbroken for everyone who made that movie, you know, was in Toronto. Sorry to throw Toronto under the bus. So we just have a few more questions left. You mentioned the bar scene and towards the end of the bar scene you actually put in footage from the first movie to sort of explain the goose died in the last movie, and I was wondering was that always the intention or when that decision was made it was not always the intention. I think the the original intention was that you just see maverick thinking about that rooster and hearing that music. But it wasn't enough and you know, we needed to connect the dots very clearly for the audience, and so that exact combination of using shots of the little boy on the piano from the first movie and seeing Maverick and goose singing great balls of fire and then seeing the the images from top gun eighty six, those iconic images which are incredibly powerful for anyone who's seen that original movie Trent one day, it's it's almost you get you get taken straight back to that shock of goose deying because it happens very fast in the original movie and they almost so fast you don't want to believe it. And the fact that he's lying there in the sea and maverick goes over to him and there he's holding him. You're like what, what it's? You can't it's so sad. In the first movie you are. You've come to love that character so much. It's so powerful, and we tried that out. We tried it with, we tried it without, we tried all different combinations of it and then we got it to work. And we use the Music Da da Da, DA, Da da DA, which is a theme that Harold wrote for the first movie. But Baba, Babaa Baba. So we use that and you know it's very powerful. Yeah, and so that wasn't in there and we got it to work. So it but it was the right thing to do because it has the right you feel man's emotions intensely. At that point you sort of pointed out like an interesting problem in like Sequel Exposition, where you don't want to disrespect anyone who is like a longtime fan who obviously knows the sapling, but then there's me who's seeing to have gun everick and I'm like, Oh, I appreciate them...

...cutting in the shot of of goose playing grip as a fire because now I am connecting these darts, and so it's I would imagine that's a hard balance that you have to be conscious. Yeah, it well, to be honest, we want everyone to be able to watch this movie regardless of if they've seen the first one or not. You cannot, ever, if you're making a movie which is mass entertainment, you can never rely on anyone ever seeing the first movie right ever, and it's you want people to come in cold and be able to watch it. Like people who see mission impossible fallout do not need to know that Ethan married Julia in mission three. They see the dream at the beginning of Ethan marrying Julia and and if you have seen mission three and mission for Ghost Protocol, then you have all that stuff. But for the rest of the audience, everything they need is in there, you know, and Chris mccory is very conscious of that and he wants to make sure that the maximum number of people can come and enjoy the movie. So for mission as well for even the upcoming missions, if there's anything we need the audience to know, will make sure that it's in there. We're not going to rely on anyone to remember anything because everyone's lived through a pandemic and no one you know. It's like you can't expect anyone to remember stuff. I I want the film has to be easy to watch and you want people to just get lost in the emotion immediately. You want us to hold your hand and guide you to the movie, and it should just be. It should just be a purely emotional experience. And and remember, most people watching the film in the world don't even speak English. So you have to make sure that the movie kind of works almost without dialog, which is another thing that Tom Cruise and Chris mcrey are very conscious of. If if you watch any of those scenes with no dialog, you'll still understand ninety nine percent of the story, I think, because listen to the sound effects in the music and you'll understand what's going on and even just the intensity of their voices, you know. But we use, you know, composition and dynamic camera moves and cutting and sound design and music to kind of give the audience a totally immersive emotional experience that does not rely on dialog, you know, given that a lot of people won't be able to speak English. So, as well as making sure they understand everything they need to know from the first movie, we're also making it it's almost like a silent movie. These films, you know, they have to work at that level. So clearly this movie has been pushed back quite a few times and it was originally pushed back from two thousand and nineteen to two thousand and twenty and then because of Covid, and I was wondering, from two thousand and nineteen to two thousand and twenty, what was that? We were the changes made in that time, and then were there any changes made during covid times, though? So we finished the film in July Two Thousand and twenty. So we went into lockdown. We were finishing vision effects, we were about to roll cameras on mission impossible seven, but that was delayed, and so that actually gave what that did do is it gave me and Tom Cruise and Chris mccrory more time to work on top gun with Joe and Jerry Bruckheimer, and we really stress tested every second of the movie over and over and over again to make sure it was absolutely as tight and as good as it can be. We got all the Vision Effects Working Great. We kept improving the music score. All this was done. You know, I was just sat up here in my loft working using a piece of software will ever cast, that allows you to transmit your avid timeline over the internet to different collaborators and and then we sound mixed you know, we were the first film back in a sound mixing stage after the after the lockdown began to lift, you know, in June of two thousand and...

...twenty, and then no changes were made to the movie from then to when it was released. Awesome. So we have our last two questions and then we'll let you be free. So I'm a huge fan of mission impossible, as anyone who knows me will tell you. So I just want to know as I'm my seven and am I eight going, because I saw that my seven trailer and it looks pretty feel, excuse my French, fucking awesome. Listen, I am thrilled the you like it. They are going to be extraordinary. You will not be disappointed. There is they're huge movies and the there is amazing stuff that Tom does in both films which is truly historic and epic and I can't wait for people to see it. It's again, both films are an incredible amount of work. They're very complex sequences, one after another after another, very, very complex. There's a lot of characters, there's a lot of stakes and there's a lot of cross cutting and parallel storytelling and all that stuff takes ages to get right to make it feel effortless when you're watching it, you know, to make it effortless to understand it's going to be awesome. That's all I can say. And I'm and we edited the trailer in South Africa, where we were filming part of mission impossible eight, and we wanted to create a teaser that didn't really give anything away and didn't feel like a typical trailer. You know, we haven't used any of the kind of trailery sound design. We based it almost entirely around a piece of music with kittridges dialog and we wanted to create a specific emotional effect in you and to make the trailer feel different from from other trailers that are out there, you know. So we ended up editing it ourselves. It kind of reminded me of the like deleted scenes, montage and fall out a little bit in terms of that is yes, you're right, that's a really good observation path. Yeah, it is. But we we just wanted to kind of give you a sense of the scale of the movie and making sure you got to see all the characters and and and give you a sense of, you know, what Kittridge is up to. Awesome trend. Do you think it's time time for the big Hun a final question? I think it's time. So the final question is, what is the last great film you watched? And not good, great, and it doesn't happen. It does have to be the first time. It can be a rewatch. Yeah, the it's quite easy because last night I watched June, which I think is fantastic. HMM. So I literally just watched it last night because I hadn't seen it since it was in the theater and I wanted to. I just remember thinking it was sublime and so I wanted to watch it again and I did. In other news, I also watched JFK recently, which I think is a masterpiece, especially fredditing. So if anyone has not seen JFK or Doune, go and see them. I mean JFK's the way that the way that they use all these different textures and film formats and the way they use sound design and dialog is just beyond brilliant. I love that film. I can't watch it enough. Awesome, Trent. Do you want closers out? Sure, thanks so much to Eddie Hamilton. He's been the editor on such films as kick ass, Xmen, first class mission possible follow out and our film for today, Joseph Kazinski's top gun. Everick, thank you so much for being here. We appreciate your time. Thanks, Trent. Thanks BA my...

...breath. That's that's beautiful track part through the magic of editing, I think our viewers by this point we'll know whether or not you edited in take my breath away four times. Trent. was that a good interview, or was that a good interview from the options you've given? I thought it was a great interview. Checkmate, Bro but one who is Great Eddie Hamilton, the editor of the film. Yeah, he did such a great job that actually saw it for the fifth time today with friend off the show and roommate of Trentel Care, Sarah Brobin. Yes, I said, I hate to recreate a genuine conversation, but I set off Mike before that when I've seen two movies, Batman and Liquorice Pizza, three times and both times what like. During the first scene of the third viewing, I was like this is too much, and so parts stamina to sea. Top Gun five times is really impressive part. Is there any other movie you seen like over three times in the theater all you want. You want to know. The only other movie I've seen four times is it one of the mission, the most recent mission movie. It's mission possible follow out. Oh Wow, good for me. It is also edited by Eddie Hamilton. Is it unfair to ask you which movie like more? I mean I would say that mission possible fallout is undeniably more important to me. Why? Why? Why? Undeniably? Well, I'm mean that's a movie that like. After watching it, I got really obsessed with the making of for it, and that's how I that's where my Christopher mccary obsession came from, and my getting on the cruise of Palooza truly began with mission possible fall out. I enjoyed other cruise movies before, but that was the movie that like sold it for me. I guess I've only known you for so long, so I guess I just figured that your Tom Cruise thing went back indefinitely. But when did mission possible fallout come out? Like when you're in high school? Two Thousand and eighteen, so that was senior year of high school. I mean I was I definitely liked and was like a fan of cruise, but that was the one where it was like, okay, I'm going to know everything about, everything that I possibly can about this man. One I want to know what I'm excited to do. It's discuss top gun maverick next week. Yeah, it's going to be fucking awesome. I think it's going to be part v Trent or part and Trent v the world, yes, or versus the haters of top gun? I don't know. I'd be curious to read the One star reviews, because it's people are dead wrong, like no fense, like what? Like what happened to you? With you? If you give that one star? Oh well, I mean, I don't want to hate funny, I don't want to name drop anyone, but I do know someone that goes to our school that was a year ahead of us, that gave the movie a year and a half, Star and a half, sorry, a star and a half and saying that, wait, me mouth it to me so I can know. Well, I could just say it to you and then edit it out, or you can just say because it's the end of the episode. Yeah, sure, say it really wow and what was why you wait? I'll just I'll bleep it out and they gatull edit. Okay, then what was their review? Or review is basically saying that they hated it because it was military propaganda and that they thought that crews gave a bad performance in this, which I kind of find weird because I feel like this is one of his better performances in recent years. Some people like to not like things, like the...

...military propaganda thing. I get, the cruise thing not so much. But like you, I mean I have my problems with the military, but that's like saying, I don't know, like this is a fictitious plot and so it's like pretty vague, but I also think that works to its benefit. But like you can't say that like saving private Ryan is military propaganda. They eve though, like a kind of is. I mean, I think these are topics better, sir, for next week's discussion, but you're probably right. That being said, thanks so much to Eddie Hamilton for talking with us. You Super, super nice to us again two episodes that were a year and a half in the making. We finally got them in. We did it for you guys, the fans. Yeah, and the fans of seemingly responded a lot of a lot of listeners for our first first day of the top gun yeah, this is as of recording the day after releasing part one, and that got quite a few clicks. So thanks to everyone that did that. And you can find us on social media at on instagram and twitter. So give us a five star review on apple podcast or spotify, wherever you get your podcasts. You can, like, write a review that I'd be dope you can tell a friend about the show. That'd be really nice and maybe they'll listen to it. That's about all. You can continue to tune in every Sunday. It's when we release our new episodes. We're on every podcasting platform under the sun that's worth using. And Yeah, again, we've got some really good stuff cooking. Don't wait, trend something fell through today, which was less fun. But yeah, wait, and I saw another email of someone rejecting us today for another movie. But like yes, although that person that rejected US might be an interesting get for a different movie that I know we would want love to talk about. Oh, I'll tell you, I'll tell you about it. Off are, but let's just say the next few months are they're well planned out and let's just say, if you like, these last last week, this week and next week, if you like, the subject of this movie. You know there's some interesting things cooking, but also, if you like, if you're like Shauce, similar.

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