Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Craft Services
Craft Services

Episode 95 · 3 months ago

TOP GUN: MAVERICK (2022) with Editor Eddie Hamilton Part One

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent discuss Top Gun: Maverick with its editor, Eddie Hamilton. They also discuss how they feel like a couple of besties that have done some things.

Edited by Parth Marathe

So, Trent, nice, see you so part you're looking well, you're looking well. HMM, look at us, we're just chipper after the interview, aren't we? Yeah, maybe maybe we just did a little interview with a production designer of a movie we really like. Maybe we just did that. I don't know. Maybe we did a thing, as they say. No, like you know on Instagram, when it's like on someone's story and it's like someone's like, Yo, bestie did a thing, that's like us right now. Like me refer to you. I'm like, Yo, Bestie, just interviewed someone. I did. Proud of you, bestie. But I think this is the first time we've ever recorded two separate entities in the same day. Unless some crazy I can't remember anything, but I feel like we might have. But yeah, I mean right now I feel like that's it. This is the only time I feel like on days that we do interviews, I'm so mentally exhausted from trying to sound smart during the interview that I am in no mood to then additionally record after. But today some some's gone into me and part I think we're on our worst behavior. It's a product of necessity. The in this episode that you're listening to today for us is coming out tomorrow. So we kind of had to yeah, I know, I mean, I hate to keep using this like modern slang, but all these like batties keep accepting our invitation to come on the show, and so we have no choice but to just keep pumping out episodes. Yeah, we're content machine. But, Trent, what have you been putting in your body recently? My Body is sort of like a machine and like the food is sort of like my gas, you know. Yeah, no, for sure, for sure. Like I'm a car, you know, and like similar to a car, I consume mostly liquids, and so I had smoothie and toast, I mean. And like a car, I don't like a lot of variety in what I give. Like part when you go to the gas station, are you film that sucker up? Are you saying twenty dollars regular debbit please, even though you know you're going to need all I gas eventually, since so you're just making yourself go back. But it feels wrong to spend a lot of money at once, I think. Generally I just fill her up, but I wait till the absolute last moment to fill her up. You know, Dude. I think if my dad were here he'd say that that's bad for the car. Yeah, no, so I had the littlest Oh yeah, you said you ate the tiniest little morsel. Yeah, I've realized joining the call that I actually hadn't eaten anything today, which it's two o'clock in the afternoon. That's probably not good, but I ran upstairs and had a little bite of a chocolate chip cookie. Nice. What I was going to say before, before you started talking about what you ate, is like the Joe with like older electronics and like maybe even like some phones. All know if this is a rumor, but apparently you're like not supposed to charge it until it's like dead dead, because charging it when it gets it's supposed to be better for the battery. Yes, it will, like it takes down the life span of it, which like sounds counterintuitive. It's a good thing, and nobody listens to that, you know, literally no one. So is that why my iphone battery is so shitty? Should I be letting it die die? Well, I mean your iphone battery is also Shitty, because apple designed it that way to to kill itself after two...

...years. Yeah, it's intentional obsolescence or something like that. Yeah, anyways, should we cut q the intro? Should we get into it? Knows, a pretty cool episode, right, Yep. Yeah, we talked about a movie with someone who worked on it. That's the show, Trent. I think. I think I'm going to put it a certain way, that I'm going to cute the intro. Is that cool with you? Keep it brow. We're going to say bestie's did a thing. C The intro part of Lary. Bestie just did a thing. Right there. Welcome back to craft services, where we talk about the movies each week. We talked about a film and hopefully ever remember all that film to talk with us about their experience working on the picture. This week, besties did a thing. Yeah, know that, they sure did. We got a real Baddie to talk with us, like a Baddie with a baddie bomb, a real bomb bitch of a movie, you know. Yeah, and that bad bitch is Eddie Hamilton. Yeah, and one could say he's the baddest bitch. And and one could say he edited the Shit Out of this movie top gun matches. Yeah, yeah, and this like not to spoil our discussion, but let's just say we like the movie. I've seen it four times. Yeah, no, people keep making the mistake of asking parth if you want, like, would you see it a fifth time? I'm going to have to have to see it with friend off the show, Sarah Brockman. Yeah, there are all these people who feel the need to experience it through your eyes and for that reason, since you're just so well connected, you've seen it four times already. But I that's the problem is so many people want to see it with me, but you haven't. You saw it with Jackson Clark and Jordan Shit Sycafous, but friends up the show. Yes, I also just saw Jurassic World Dominion, which that's all we're going to say about that right now, for Ye, you know, for more reasons than one. Yeah, but yeah, we got to talk with Addie Hamilton. He was super, super cool. This was an episode that was a year and a half in the making. I first emailed him at the beginning of two thousand and twenty one, yes, because top gun maverick has been like on the edge of release for years. By this point. It's just been a way in like two years on someone's hard drive. And but yeah, so we talked with him. He talked to us about how he got involved with editing, how he got involved with the movie. He talks a little bit about a few sequences, about how they would plan the shots. But I don't want to give too much away, Trent. Should we just cut straight into it? Like yeah, but like while like at the essence of the interview, like, well, the core, like we were asking questions and he was answering them, but at the same time we were all just like vibing, just like talking about top gun, and I think that's what's important. And like we were kind of Oh wait, Trent, I know how we're going to queue into this intro. Okay, you want to have no how we're going to do it. Sure, tell me to tell the audience. I'm going to tell the audience you're now entering the danger zone. Down, down, down, down. All right, that's just that's just the wrong song. Hello, everybody, and welcome to interview with Eddie Hamilton. He's the editor behind such films as kick ass, Xment for his class, possible fall out, and our film for today, Joseph Kazinski. Stop going mavery thank you so much for Englis today. Thanks for inviting me on Path and Trent. It's pleasure to be here. Thanks, guys. So, just to start off, what was your relationship with film like at a young age? I wasn't taken to the movies much as a kid. I think I saw...

...snow white in the seven dwarfs, in the honor Jones and the Temple of doom closing cancer the third kind of you to a kill return of the Jedi. That was kind of it. When I was growing up. I had to beg my friends parents to take me to see return of the Jedi because my parents wouldn't take me. But I remember when I was eight, watching Star Wars on TV and noticing people's names on the end of the credits and just thinking it was the most incredible thing I've ever seen in my life. And when I was eight I thought, well, hang on a second, does that mean if I see people's names on the film, does that mean people make films like is that something you can actually do with your life? And so from the age of eight I was just very obsessed with movies. I'd started my love affair with the cinema and I remember just listening to music and watching as many films as I could and reading books and and then and go and seeing as any food movies as I could on on the HS and on on TV. And you know, when I was about seventeen I discovered editing and and then I thought that that the combination of storytelling and technology would suit me, you know. So what was the first major movie you worked on or how did you start to find how? What what projects did you start to work on? I Sta I started making the tea in a post production facility in London and I they edited. They did quite a lot of sport television programming and I actually spent quite a lot of time editing Portuguese and Spanish sports television programs, which I didn't really speak Portuguese or Spanish and I'm not a massive fan of sport, but I had to turn around these programs very quickly. There was a small team of us and we got very fast on using avid media. Composer. In one thousand nine hundred and ninety six or ninety five, I think this was. But I always wants to work in movies, and so I I found some people who were making a no budget feature and shooting on Super Sixteen and I went and I said to them, can I edit your movie basically for free? And I did that and I did about maybe nine low budget movies, pretty much for nothing most of them. And then my big break came when I worked on a film that Matthew Vaughn produced, which was called mean machine and it was a British football movie about Vinnie Jones in prison playing a football match. And that relationship with Matthew led on to kick ass and xmen first class and then Kingsman, obviously, and then that led on to getting a call to do mission impossible. That was twenty years after I started, though. So it took me twenty years from from, for like, first touching an avid media composer to getting a phone call to do mission impossible road nation, and then eventually, after I did road nation and fall out, then Tom Cruise asked me or invited me on board to do top gun maverick. Yeah, I mean that was going to be our next question of like how you got involved. So, like what kind of what was the meeting like with Tom Cruise, and I assumed Joseph Kauzinski was there too, like when you were approached to do it? Okay, so I got a call from my agent actually, while I was in Arizona for a mission impossible fallout test screening. It was I'm going to say April, two thousand and eighteen maybe, and I got a call saying they want Joseph Kazinski would love to have a chat with you about top gun maverick and I said, well, look, I'm only in Arizona. Why didn't I fly to Santa Monica tomorrow morning and move my flight back so that I come back from La and then I can go and meet Joe?...

So after the the test screening I went. I flew to Santa Monica very early in the morning and I arrived at Jerry Bruckheimer's office and sat and had a long meeting with Joe and then a meeting with Jerry Bruckheimer, and they were very it was it was super exciting to meet them both and hear what their thoughts were about the film and, you know, read the script that existed then. But I think I had Tom on my side and he said, look, I'd really love you guys to consider Eddie to do the movie because we've had a great experience working on rogue nation and on fallout and I really like them and luckily they said Yeah, sure, that would be great, let's let's and I you know, I'm a huge fan of top gun. You know, I saw the original in the cinema six times when it came out. I was fourteen years old, so I was a perfect age and a huge admirer of Jerry Bruckheimer's and this movie was going to be a very complex, challenging puzzle to build and they wanted someone who was super enthusiastic and passionate and shared their love for aviation and for the original movie. And and you know, it was quite a challenge because I had to move my family to Los Angeles from London for a year, from August twenty eighteen to twenty nineteen. So I had to put my kids in a school in Venice, we rented a house. But overall it, I mean it was very, very, very hard work for two years this movie. But overall, obviously it's turned out well and everyone seems to be very happy. So, as usual, it's all worth it in the end. So being you saw the script in its earliest form and then you were tasked with adding and now you see the finished product. Is there any major like changes? I mean I'm sure any most worthn't noting. Well, they the film changed enormously constantly because the way that Tom Cruise and the writer, Chris mcquary, he came on and was doing a most of the of the writing while we were filming. They are constantly learning from everything they've done up to that point and they're constantly asking themselves, how can we improve this and getting the tone of mavericks relationship with Rooster Right, how to introduce maverick? They used to be a scene at the top of you know, way early on in the draft. I read there was a scene with some other fighter pilots having an and having an adventure at the top of the movie. But the film's called top Gun Maverick and the film has to be a pyramid around the character of Maverick, with maverick at the top and then hang man and rooster and then payback and fan boy in Phoenix and Bolk. So you have to kind of make sure that the film is built around that and it doesn't have to be explicit, but it does have to be subconscious as you're watching the movie and it does guide how you build the film and the kind of coverage that you choose and when you use close ups and how you how Joe directed the scenes and covered the scenes and the film changed constantly. It was a process of iteration two years to keep improving and improving and improving, and it was quite a lot of stuff where we shot something and then we went back and pad another go at it. Sometimes we have back had a third go at it to get it right, and this was just a case of discovering, you know, the best way to kind of balance the character and the conflict and the adventure just to keep the audience leaning in, you know, and really maverick and rooster only, you know, resolve their differences right towards the end of the movie, but that means that you don't get that release, that emotional release, until much later. And we had them resolved their differences at different places in the film to see how that would affect the audience emotion going into the...

Third Act. But we know, ultimately we figured out that what's in there now would be the best combination of emotion for the audience. So I heard in an interview with Joseph Kazinski that there was eight hundred and thirteen hours of footage, like flying footage, and I was just wondering, like what even is the process of being able to go through so much footage, because I've the movies like to hours, ten minutes or something. Yeah, exactly. It is enormously challenging path, I will say that. So it was eight hundred and thirteen hours in total, so not just the aerial footage, but it was, you know, eighty percent aerial footage, I'd say. And the main, the main trick is not to allow yourself to get overwhelmed, so try and stay on top of it on a daily basis. Now, I never managed to edit the footage on a daily basis. All I really managed to do on the very heavy days was have an idea of what they had filmed and skim through and check that we had the emotional beats that we were hoping that we would get. But it's impossible to to really go through all this footage and be thorough and know that you've got absolutely all the best moments that are in there without taking your time to go through it. And it was it was just a case of putting one foot in front of the other and slowly building these sequences shot by shot and and knowing it was going to take a very, very, very long time. The Third Act mission, starting from when math blasts off the carrier, took me about three months to do that, which I think is about half an hour. Maybe it was a bit longer at that point, but just to get a first pass of something down on the timeline with all the beats that we had filmed and to make sure that all the best shots from the jets were there. It was still way too long and we still compressed everything considerably to make sure it was super exciting and to make sure that the way we were into cutting the different stories in the final mission felt natural as you watched it, which just takes, you know, additional months and months and months of refinement and then figuring out how to get the music to work and how to get the sound designed to work and where to put music and, you know, the the sequence with all the surface to wear missiles took a very, very long time to get the balance of that right. Started off very long and everything was created in the edit for that sequence. There was there was nothing scripted. We would we would it just what it said in the script. Is the jets blast over the mountaintop and the SAM's fire at them and all hell breaks loose, you know. So all those lines of dialog that they're all shouting to each other, we built and refined and refined and refined. And because they're all wearing masks, we can put whatever we want there, which is what they had to do in the first top gun. Quite a lot, but it you just have to start somewhere and then watch what you've got, however bad it is, and then slowly improve it with the help of the brain trust on the movie of jokers in Ski, Jerry Bruck, climber, Chris mccrory and led, of course, by Tom Cruise, you know, who has final cuts on this film. We read that before you shoot in the jets that you would have two hour meetings about what you're going to film and like young talk about those. Okay, it's a Ya. So so that's right. So we were. We were went to six different US naval...

...bases on the west coast of the US over a period of many months in the kind of spring and summer of two thousand and nineteen, and it was very the days were very long. We would get up at five, meet in the hotel lobby at five hundred and thirty, drive to the naval base, be there by six, set up our gear and then at seven o'clock the first briefing would happen and it would be a twoh our briefing where they would talk in detail about every little piece of action or dialog or emotion that they that Joe was kind of asking the actors to capture. There'll be about twenty people in the room, a lot of people from top gun, top gun pilots, and then a lot of the crew, and most of the time Tom was there as well, and they would they would get break everything down and it would be very, very carefully planned. Twenty minutes to beat meeting would be how to eject from the aircraft safely. So over months and months and months I heard how to eject from the aircraft twice a day, for twenty minutes each time, and they never took any shortcuts with safety. And then Joe would take the actors to this wooden cockpit buck that we had made so that they could rehearse with the actual top gun pilot and the actor in the back and they could talk about, you know, where the song was going to be over their shoulder and which part of the terrain they were going to be and what the plane was going to be doing and and then they would fly and it would be they would fly for like an hour and an hour and a half and when they came back they would usually have rolled the cameras between twenty to forty minutes on each flight, take one of the camera cards out, put it on a big screen and we would watch back the highlights of the footage which passed forward through it. So everyone would be watching everyone else's footage. So it was quite it was quite raw for the pilot who had just gone up, you know, but everyone was on the same team and we were all very supportive and helpful. But that meant that I was aware of what the intention of each flight was and I had two of my assistant editing team there at the base with me and we would start to break the footage down immediately and start to log every little thing that the pilots did in the air and every line of dialog that they said, and I would build the six way split screens on my avid media composed timeline so that I could see all the cameras simultaneously and then Joe and I jokers in sky and I would look at the footage at the end of each day, between like eight and thirty PM, and then we would go back to the hotel and and it would all and you know. But so we were we were all kind of quite exhausted because it was very long days. But it's very expensive to send a jet up. It's eleven thou dollars an hour for a jet for fuel. So you've got to make sure that you don't waste your time up up in the air. So the the mission in this movie is very clearly explained so that by the time we go to the third act, like you know exactly what's happening and doesn't really need to be explained to you. And so I was kind of just wondering, like how difficult was it to make that clear throughout the movie? And the specifics of the mission ever change over the course of the filming of the movie? Good question, but the specifics of the mission did not change. That the idea of going low and fast through a canyon to avoid surface to wear missiles and then doing a pop up over a mountain down and target using a clear, you know, a laser guided sight to drop two sets of bombs and have two consecutive miracles. That was always in there. It's very important in these kinds of movies, any kind of heist movie or something like a mission impossible movie, to teach the audience about the stakes of the mission and about the parameters of what it is the the characters have to achieve, so that when you watch...

...shit you don't have to have stuff explains to you. Chris mcclorie has a great expression. He's like you have to eat your Broccoli first and then you get your Brownie and you don't want Broccoli while you're eating your Brownie, you know. So I will say, though, that teaching the audience about how to achieve this mission with the different graphics and the inserts in the jets and then the graphics in the in the training room, in the tack room, where we show the the jets going through the Canyon and then being shot down, and then we're into cutting with the reactions of the pilots. Were into cutting with the jet blasting through the canyons, and then we're teaching the audience about the pop up and about, you know, targeting and dropping. One set in that was incredibly difficult to get right. It was again weeks and weeks and weeks and weeks of work, of just slowly, slowly refining and refining and refining and refining and compressing and then trying things out and trying other things out, going going back and picking up additional angles on the pilots to make sure that we had great reactions. But it's a very good question because that stuff is really, really hard to do and the real trick is to make it effortless to watch, so your eye is always guided around the screen and you feel exactly the right emotion for everything as it's happening in the sequen it's you're never confused, you're always keeping up with the story and you're learning about, you know, the parameters of speed and time and height and Geez. So that, so much so that when Maverick does the Canyon run and he says I'll do it in two hundred and fifteen, the audience is like, Whoa, that's pretty fast, like everyone watching goes that's really fast. And then you see that he's done a pull up and you see his g counter goes seven, seven point five, eight, eight and then it goes to ten at the end and hangman goes damn like everyone in the audience is going. He has that plane is toast. You know, he is totally bent the airframe of that FA team, but he's proved that he can do it. You know, it is very cool that sequence. I remember that was one of the earliest sequences we film because it only required Tom in the air and he was showing the other pilots how to film this stuff. But I remember that that low level run, that that that Maverick does through the canyon, which is totally real and not sped up. It's incredibly fast and so dangerous. There was one pilot in the navy who was given permission by the air boss to fly that SUP plot. It's called Star Wars Canyon, believe it or not, because it looks a little bit like tattooing, and the plane is going nearly seven hundred miles an hour and sometimes it's forty feet off the ground and the plane is going so fast at the pilot can't even see where he's going because he he just has to know the terrain and guide the plane around the corners knowing what's coming up. And we did it four times with Tom in the cockpit and each time we came back and watched it. We were like still not fast enough or low enough. And then it was a Friday afternoon, if I remember rightly, and Tom said right, let's give it one more go and they went up and they hit. They had this blue angels pilot. All right, so this guy, he's the best pilot in the navy, and he went in and they they went out for an hour and then they came back and they both walked in and they looked a little bit like shell shot and the guy said, I hope you got it, because I ain't doing that again. And we put it on and it was what you see in the movie, which is just absolutely jaw dropping, so fast and so close to the edge. You can see this shadow of the plane on the on the on the mountain sometimes. But to...

...be there in the room when we were watching that, everyone was totally speech this and we were like that is going in the movie. That's amazing, that is amazing and you know he, that pilot, will be able to tell his kids and his grandkids that guy, I'm flying Tom Cruise in that sequence in top gun maverick. You know, I'm the only guy who was allowed to do it in the world it's pretty cool. So you bring up star wars and I think with the mission you can't help but think of like the trench run and then, yes, like in ways of filming, like people on airplanes, like other war movies like Dunkirk and stuff like. Purposely or not purposely? Are you like when editing, are you in conversation with those, or are you trying to do your own thing, or are you're trying to reference those in any way? I'm I'm just trying to tell the best story that exists with the footage that I have, which is the answer almost any editor will give you, because I listen. When I was building that sequence, obviously, you know, we could have put some want rats in there. We could have had, you know, the exhaust port right below the main port, all of that star wars stuff. We're all joking to ourselves about this, but obviously there's a lot more that happens in our movy after they drop that, you know, like there's actually you need to have two miracles, so it's like Luke and palm doing it, you know what I mean? And then there's that whole section at the end after that, you know, with the SAM's and all of that stuff that happens in the rest of the movie, which is, you know, its own thing. But yes, obviously the trench run, they're flying low, they're flying fast and I remember thinking this is really difficult. And what's difficult is the cross cutting, as I said to you, between between maverick and then between rooster and then back to the base and then to the you know, the the Tomahawk missiles. It's it's it's very difficult to kind of jump around the story and keep track of everybody. So you know, and then you've got the two enemyc fifty seven's coming, so you need to know where they are and how far away they are and what's rooster doing? What's Maverick doing? That's one of the reasons the bridge that they fly under is quite useful, because Maverick and Phoenix go under a bridge and rooster's being slow and then he blasts and then you see Maverick and Phoenix go up, start to climb up the Canyon and dive down and do their thing and then you see rooster go through the bridge. So you going, Oh, I saw maverick and Phoenix go through that, so I know that he's not far behind. All that stuff. It was, you know, carefully thought out, but when I was watching it I remember thinking damn, it must have been hard to add do the trench run in star wars because they didn't have anything. They had no everything was visual effects. They had the shots in the cockpit, but everything else. So I remember we did some of our sound mixing at Skywalker and I met Ben Burt, the sound designer on Star Wars, you know, the legendary Ben Burt, and I said to Ben I bought him breakfast one day because I'm such a huge fan of star wars and I had loads of questions about how he because he was the editor on on episodes one, hundred and twenty three as well. I he helped cut there, I think, or at least episodes two and three. Anyway, we originally what they did is they filmed all this World War II movie footage off the TV. So George Lucas got a sixteen milk camera and he he literally recorded World War Two movies off the TV in black and white and they cut the whole sequence with this sixteen millimeter World War Two footage. And I said to Ben, do you have that, because it's quite apocryphal. You know, you read about this and I wonder if if you've got a copy, because I'd love to see it because I'm in the middle of doing this sequence now. And he said, actually, I do, and he showed me on his laptop. He had an archive and he showed me the original trench run from Star Wars with this World War Two movie footage cut in. None of the visual...

...effects were in and it's in Oh and he had it side by side, like he had a split screen of the finished movie and this World War Two footage and it was amazing to see how how they use that as kind of early previs you know, but it was we did so in I was thinking about it, but you have to make your own movie work and I obviously I've seen dunkirk twice and you know, I work with Lee Smith on Xmen First Class and he won an Oscar for Dune Kirk and he's a genius and he's easily I mean he's one of the best editors in the world, without question, and so I was aware of it and I I but what's interesting with that is that so much of it was filmed for real with Imax cameras and they can't just roll and roll and roll, whereas we could. So some of the digital cameras did roll for quite a long time in top gun, which is why we ended up with so much footage, but it they meant a lot of a lot of my time was spent chasing through hours of footage to see if I could find eighteen frames of a plane going, you know, which just took forever biken. I didn't take any shortcuts and I can assure you that all the coolest shots of planes that we had in any location are all in the movie, you know, because because I'm a fan as well and I I want I don't want to let the audience down. You know, I love top gun and I want everyone to go to this movie and think, holy smokes, that was awesome, you know, and I want, if maybe I want people to feel how much kind of love and affection was poured into every second of the movie. You know, every aspect of the film. You know, the color and the sound and the music and the the editing and the composition and the acting. I mean everything we just we put I was I just poured so much love into it for two years to make sure it was going to be as good as it could possibly be. But then I'd seen it three hundred times and I had no idea if anyone was going to like it or not. But luckily people seem to enjoy it, which is just a massive relief. I've seen it twice at this point and everybody I've taken to go see it as enjoyed it. I'm thrilled. Path thank you. I'm taking my parents next week. Fantastic. So, parth. Hey, that interview, hey buddy, was pretty great, and I was only the first half of it. I'm sure the fans knew that by this point, if they've come this far, that next week they can expect to find the second half of this conversation. Yeah, so that this interview went so long. When an hour long? So we were like, you know what, we're going to spread the love over two weeks. besties are going to do another thing next week. You know the best he's continue to do things and we're dividing our things into smaller things so we can continue to do things with more regularity. You know, yeah, with two episodes for with your two favorite Besti's part and Trent. You know, Yep, I think using the word best see this much is sort of like trying your brain. It just like Zapping me. I'm malfunctioning. We already revealed just coming next week's now we just have to beg the people at home to to review our to rate and and write review and subscribe it. No, subscribe isn't even a thing. Follow us on social media. Follow us on twitter, instagram. Those of the two we have and also, as of yesterday, we've we've joined an unprecedented amount of podcasting platforms. We're on apple, podcast, spotify, stitcher, Pandora, iheartradio, pod Chaser, some shit like that. I don't know. Basically, like, wherever you get your podcast, stitcher is probably, I would imagine, more relevant than some of the ones you just named. Because, yeah, yeah, but if you listen to podcast us, we're probably on that APP you use.

So if you know anyone that is like I only listen to Bud getson Amazon music, we're on Amazon music. So or do you have anyone else to you know who's like Hey, I like to consume median, watch TV and maybe even occasionally a film. You should tell them to watch the show, because we we also like those things and we like you humble listener. Insert parth. CAN YOU INSERT A random name here? Cath Catherine, Jennifer, Jason, John, Peter, clunk, clink, clunk, blank, shunk, some could say. So if your name's trunk, If your name's chunk and you're listening to the show, we appreciate you. Yeah, was who's it? Yeah, who we owe what? I actually wanted to say something about that, but let's just say someone we know was name. It's called chunk by Jackson. YEA, and they didn't like and was not happy about it, and maybe they were on our Staten Island discussion, you know, King of Stin Island. Sorry, yeah, maybe it was your housemate chloe dit laugh, and Jackson called people her clink and know they called Claire clank and her clunk. They she clunk he called. He called Claire Clunk and chloe chunk. Oh, I see the problem. Well, clong, it wasn't any it what? Clock doesn't sound good, but chalk like is particularly not very good. Strangely, clink doesn't. But like if someone called me Clint, I'd be like okay, well, clink sounds like a mistake, almost like that, just like like clock sounds like a name. And Shaw and chunk. You might as well be called fat. But but clink is just like that's like a sound. Yeah, yeah, it's. What's what's the word? Amatopeia? On Amatopeia. That's what we're searching for. Yeah, so we're on everywhere. Go give us a good rating. Come back next week as we close out our interview for top gun. Maverick Trent, should I close us out with danger zone again instead of our Gent Usual and music? Sure, yeah, danger zone is pretty awesome. Top Gun is pretty cool. We'll be discussing it. Is that just going to be a trent versus part episode, or might be Trent and part versus the world, since we're on the same team of loving top gun? That's true. I don't know. I think I might want to keep it to just us, because it, wait, just the best we can go. Wait, I just want besties to do yet another thing, you know, like and I just want I want some of the baddest bitches I know, you and me, to be on that episode. You know. Yep. Well, with that being said, good night by ICE.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (109)