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Episode 48 · 1 year ago

THE DEPARTED (2006) with Script Supervisor Martha Pinson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Trent and Parth interview Martin Scorcese's long time script supervisor Martha Pinson, she was delightful. We also tastefully use our Boston accents.

Edited by Parth Marathe

You know we do here my section. Sorry, yes, sir, I have an idea. Oh, let's see, you have no idea. Leave it at that. Okay, no idea, SIP, none good idea. But what we do? We would not be good at what we do, would we? We would be cunts. You calling US counts. Trent, I have a question for you. Yes, what have you eaten most recently? Okay, awesome, wait, can you ask me again, but as the joker now problem, Trent. Trent, I have a question for you. Yeah, what's that, the joker? Well, Trent, I suppose I want to ask you what you've what you've been eating most recently. Oh, thank you, the joker, and thank you baying from earlier. No problem, now that all of Gotham's super villains have assembled, to small talk, all all I have inside me is my my shift meal from working at the restaurant this morning, and I spent the rest of the day installing a blind and my new bronze bick apartment with my mom, because I do couldn't, because I couldn't do it alone. And then I get home and I'm tired and I'm hungry. Dry. These boys and parth is like weed. To podcast right now. Oh that's what I sound like. Yeah, and I was like, Paparreth, I'm so hungry and I'm so tired, like maybe we could just like rescheduled, a little rain check, and you're like, I'm tired of few excuses. This podcast is a full time job. It's not the podcast the listeners des her, but the one they need right now. Yeah, so would you have thanks for asking, Trent. Yes, sorry, I can't assemble any, any super villains to pose that question. Can do one? Can you do a joker? And pressure do you do? Request that? Will the jokers already here? Are you only to try? This isn't married. I want you, I want you to try. I want you to embarrass yourself a little bit, just it's for the show. Try It's it. Well, when it's for the pot, I'm willing to try anything once. All right, I get those looking so a part. Yeah, what have you been eating recently? Yeah, all right, what if? All right, well, that was that was that. It was most it was mostly like a lips and tongue. Thanks for asking me. Other joker, joker too, to be exact. Yeah, well, Joker to point out hop topical considering joker too is in develop is it going to be called joker to, because that sounds like a stupid name. Stupid name for stupid movie. Oh wait, maybe it'll be called it'll do the alien or the predators trick and let's be called jokers. It's like multipable. Well, it could be the joker verse. Bro I feel like no, that has that upset you? That just seems like a bad idea. You Dude. It would be super tasteful if we CGI'ED Heath Ledger's dead body just into the film. Yeah, I'm sure. Speaking of tasteful, I had my parents bought these shitty fruit peel. There are a part of things that kind of like a fruit roll up kind of, but like a more healthy versions of those. So I like fruit bark kind of thing, yes, and but it was good. I what fruit my toime was it originally from? I's like mixed berries or something. It's what keen Phoenix coming back for joker to. I feel like he should have been artistically way above the first project, which makes his return even more questionable. And that's why I love you, Trent. You stay on topic. As far as I know, I think he is or he's meant to it, because it's a Todd Phillips is coming back. But part if you had to choose between Jack Nicholson Joker and Wi Queen Phoenix joker, let's just let's just make that little distinction...

...before the introduction music. You want me to you want me to choose, choose, because I feel like the first place spot and the fourth place spot are firmly cemented. So if we were going to have an interesting conversation about the subject, this is the only real ordering that's there's left to do. They're very different. I think both do a relatively good job, but I would say, are we talking their jokers or how they are in their movie? I feel like the be an unfair comparison, because what Quen Phoenix has ninety four movie to him as a whole, movie to himself, and and Jack Nicholson has like forty percent of them movie, and I think as a joker I think Jack Nicholson is more interesting. Good to know. All right, it's the departed episode, Ladies and Gentlemen, Looks Cute. INTRO. Let's to the intro and just before warning part, and I always speaking in Basson accents, not during the whole time, but the word departed rolls around. I think bad it. That about it. Come on, so the party week, baby, come on, it's for the pot. All right, that's enough. They'lcome back to the PODCAST, craft services, the show about dus movies. Each week we select own film and interview someone who work on DOS film. Comrade Parthy, want to take it from here. Yes, this week we talked about the DEBAT. It. That about it. Yeah, with its grip, supervisor, Martha Pinson. Now, Trent, I want you to remind me of a very simple opinion, that that you have this interview. Would you say you liked it? I would go as far as to say I really liked it. Yeah, no, Martha Pinson was a delightful woman and she's been Martin Scorsese script supervisor on many, many films, on many many films. And I don't know if you've ever worked closely with Martin Scorsese, have you? You seem pretty qualified. No, he and I were on a really good first name basis. Are you and Marty? Yeah, well, okay, Trent, I mean don't overstep your bounce. Okay, all right, excuse me. You and Mr Scorsese. Yeah, thank you. Yeah, know, me and Marty were tight, cool where. We've got a good flow going. You know, I think over the years he's really mellowed and it's just you've seen him grow into the the artistic filmmaker you know he already was. You know I. So are you saying that you played a role in developing him into that filmmaker, Wall that in the fully formed artist? Trent, I'M NOT gonna I'm not going to sit here and deny what you just said. I'm not going to confirm it, but I'm definitely not going to deny it. It would just be uncouth. I make it a policy not to talk about so part of how I influence the greatest directors of all time. Just riddle me this. Okay, it's it's my impression that you were like when good fellows was the release. You, like you, you weren't even alive yet. So, like dus meaning, you know, how could you leave everything you've heard? How could you have influenced him? Yes, so, Martha Pinson worked with Brian to Palma, she worked with Oliver Stone, Sidney Lumett. You know, Marty is not the much luck, much like myself, is not the only great director that she's worked with and she had a bunch of fun stories she had. She's she was a very sweet lady and we hope to have her again. Maybe sometimes. Yeah, and, believe it or not, because of all the juicy details that were spilled in the episode, Martha Pinson said, we're gonna WE'RE gonna have to get this checked out by the Scorsese team.

And so some poor intern in the Scorsese Office is listening to that interview right now and waiting to see if any trade secrets are revealed. And Martin Scorsese's desk jockey, if you're hearing this, we appreciate your time. Thanks for coming. At least you're getting paid to us in the show. Tell Mr Scorsese, we said hello. Tell Martha Pinson, we said Hello. Say Hello to Marty for me and you know, and just I like I have this really good, like short film idea and like it's going to be the you, just like Martha Pinson. Now, hello everybody, and welcome to our interview with Martha Pinson. She's the script supervisor behind such projects as Wall Street, dressed to kill, the aviator and our film for today, Martin Scorsese's the departed. Thank you so much for being with us. My pleasure. Thank you. So, just to start out, if you could tell us what your relationship with film was at a young age. Well, I grew up in on a farm in New Jersey back in the s. You know, I love the movies. Film and also literature were just so exciting to me, and also dance. So there was a movie theater like about five miles from me and Bernardsville, New Jersey, and that's the one we went to. Pretty well, I was pretty young. Million dollar movie came on television, CBS I think it was, and so they played classic movies on the television, which I also love. So I was just smitten by film from the first chance I got to see it and I love the visuals. It seemed like a miracle to me that something could be imaginary and yet have all the real senses of movement, voice, visual beauty or action. It just was I thought it was amazing. So did you have any sort of formal or informal film education and how did you find your way into the industry? Yes, when I was in college they didn't really have much in the way of film education. For example, like I went to Vassar and I was in English major and they had a film society. So we could go see movies on Friday evening at the at in one of the local, you know buildings, right, and that was great. I loved it. But they didn't have any film study programs. However, they I think they started the first film program you know classes, when I was a I think a junior, maybe a senior. So just it was just getting going when I was graduating. Shortly after it did get pretty big, you know. And why? You Film School got to be pretty big pretty fast. Yes, and what was the other part of the question? How did you find your way on to set? Essentially, okay, I was a film buff and I moved up to Cambridge Massachusetts. That's where some of my friends were, you know, after college. I you know, I was away from home, but we I sort of figured I would have to, you know, get get a job and so forth, and I love the all the Indie film film theaters in Cambridge Mass in Boston. That would go to them. And one of my friends said she saw on the paper that there was a job for someone to sell tickets at the Orson well cinema and she just showed me. I'm like, all right, I'll apply because I could go. I reason I liked it was not to sell tickets but to get free passed all the other indie movie theaters in Cambridge. So I said, I went in and the fellow hired me. You know, I was lucky. I guess it just I just seemed, I guess, kind of enthusiastic and relatively calm and nice or something. You know about not, but you know, I made the sense that I was. So I was hired and...

I so I started selling tickets and I loved going to all the free movies and meeting the some of the directors that came in, like Bob Marley and Jimmy Cliff, you know, because we were show harder. They come every Friday night for like a year. So I moved up from being from selling tickets and and candy to being the House manager, to being the head of publicity, and that actually happened pretty quickly because the theater was kind of thriving and growing. And this was in I started there in seventy three and you know, I was I moved up pretty fast and I think about seventy seventy five is about when I left to work in New York. It was timing and just my natural love of movies and I was pretty, you know, sociable and common. So I got along with the other employees and the programmer of the theater said we I should come to con with him and look for films. So we did that and that was amazing. And so then, you know, for example, Hester Street, with joanes silver directed, was one of the hits. We found it on film fencible, and so then I handled the public relations, you know, the publicity and everything for that and lots of other documentaries and also, indeed, dramatic films. So Joan silver and I, you know, come of other people, Verry mccluan. People said to me, mark that I made money because of what you did. You have to work for me, like, okay, doing what? So I was invited to visit this set and come to New York City kind of hang out while people are shooting this and that. I worked as a production assistant on what film, for one of those, and I was introduced to a script supervisor on one of the features. A script supervisor was one of the few jobs and in a general sense, for a woman on set, because most of the other jobs involved, you know, caring heavy equipment or, you know, handling like a camera or a bunch of sound gear. If you had a rich dad, you could be a director, just a regular person. You could be a script supervisor, you know, or go into the production offer, shall we say. I wanted to be on set for sure. I wasn't interested in being in the office. I hate in an office. I love to be active. So working on the street, I was like you kidding me? That's great. I was just introduced to script supervisor. Was it was was amazing kind of how a natural sort of was because I think it was my timing. And then I had an honors degree from vassador college and Literature and Shakespeare and Greek drama, I mean I was and dance and whatever. You know, I knew kind of the general area of creativity. I just was able to attend shoot days as an observer and a trainee and then was introduced to people and I, you know, I got I started getting high, getting hard. It wasn't that hard, it was I think my timing was good. The film industry in New York City was kind of blossoming in the the mid s hmmm. So what was the first major motion picture that you script supervised? The first major motion picture was dressed to kill. Oh my God, well, starting, starting with the big one. Yeah, I don't know, just this kind of just random that. I did you know who Brian De Palma was going into it? Yeah, absolutely. Anyway, so I did A. Just to back up a little bit, I did a I was living partly in Boston, this and that, and I knew some people up there, this and that. So I was script supervisor on a four part historical dramatic miniseries based on the scarlet letter, for episodes and then the director said, you know, you're the only person I can trust. Will you come and stick stay with me in post and help me edit this? I'm like yeah, sure. We shot like bawl summer, you know, the four episodes, and it was wonderful. John Heard was the star and got the other people, but whatever, it was good and was a PBS special. And so I...

...worked for like six months in the post with the with the director, and that was really helpful as well, because I learned a lot about editing and then and it was a quality piece, you know, a great novel. Then I you know, I sort of went back to New York and I knew a few people and got a few introductions and worked as a PA on a film and I was introduced as the scriptupervisor who was a wonderful veteran and she had even written a book about it. So I got the book and, you know, stuff like that. It seemed like it was all very natural and I met people, you know, I had to go up there and meet the people and and then so I got the calls to dress to kill and I love the script and I was terrified, you know, shaking when I got my God, you know, it's so scary, but I was completely just amazed. On the other hand, it's not like a really fancy job. It's a gritty job. You have to make sure that there are no errors. You have to make sure that if an actor changes a line, it's okay, it's not making a stupid error in the film. You have to make sure that the collar is right. Nowadays we have, you know, video playback stuff like that, but in the s all there was with somebody's word. You couldn't play anything back or whatever. You know, just right which handed I have the gun in. So the it was. Yes, it was all about jotting down what needed to be clocked as correct. Jumping forward a little bad it. How did you end up getting involved with the departed and how did your working relationship with Martin Scorsese? Had that sort of start? Well, the thing is there again, I had. I was just really, really lucky. I didn't, I think, came and I moved with them Sitney, the met, you know, it was just I he was so amazing and he just thought I was smart and yeah, call her. You know, it was incredibly wonderful. Aspect of working with him was that he had two or three weeks of rehearsal with the cast and so forth. So I learned a lot. Somebody just, I guess, knew me like a PA, I mean, sorry, a production manager or somebody who was like hiring or whatever, making calls. So it was one thousand nine hundred and eighty six, I think, when I got the call to work on the video for Bet Michael Jackson's bad with the school. That was my first job with Marty and it was terrific. It was a few days in the subway and it just went well. I mean I think we just sort of was okay, he was thought I was okay. No, wasn't a big challenge or anything, but I think I did a good job and so I was sort of on the radar. But then I did go back to working with, you know, other people, as I was kind of booked. So what was the first versesy picture? He worked on bringing out the dead, which was amazing, was fascinating, but hard work because it was mostly nights, HMM, and a lot exterior. It was we earned our guys houries for sure. So just a quick question jumping back to the music video you mentioned, because I'm sure there's less like, you know, dialog to be to to be keeping an eye out for. So is the mostly just like costume and prop based continuity? Well, the key thing is, in a sense it was. Truthfully, you write it it would a music video. It's not difficult description, advisor. It's a scriptur real wives. In fact, I'm sure lots of them don't even have but we had. There were some. There were some you know, regular sort of dramatic exchanges, you know conversations, and then there were there was, you know, dance and music and everything. So the good news that makes it easier for the scriptiondvisor is that musicians singers and they got it down. It's not like they're just figuring it out for the first time. The choreography, that the performance, you know, that's all pretty well worked out.

You know, they're not ad libbing it as say go along, which makes it a little more complicated for us. So it was just a matter of making sure that, you know, certain certain elements in the staging, the lighting, the props, even just the background, you know, matched established continuity so that it would cut the way it was intended to be cut. You don't you shoot things out of order. So sometimes you shoot the you know, the small piece that goes is a halfway past the middle, you know, kind of so that then that has to match what you then may shoot the next day or nick for next month. That you know that is supposed to be the moment right before it, but you shoot it months later. So everybody has to know that it's got a match. Have you ever worked on a film that was shot in sequence? No, does that? Does that never happen? There is always, I think, a consideration and an effort to give it some sequence, know to say the end, somewhat for the end. But yeah, no, it's just understood that you shoot you shoot it the way that it makes sense to shoot it, based on the cast locations, you know, various things. So, going back to the departed, what's it like being on set? What's the sort of vibe there? How many takes does he shoot? You know, how often does he change things on set? Because I'm sure those are all sort of considerations you have to take into account as a script supervisor. One thing that's established with with the department as well as other the other films I did with Marty, is that he plans very carefully the visual and the editing and the design, you name it, of his shots and he has a list as it work. He's sketched on the page what he wants to see, how he wants to see it, how it's going to be stage. I mean it's just a it just a sketch or job diagram sometimes, but he's at it in his mind. So he has the film in a sense, already edited in his mapped out before he you know, it's all in his brain before he goes yet this debt right m the and you know the tremendous amount of work goes into all the esthetic and artistic camera, art design, decres, you know, all of it, right. So then it's more it's a question of like taking a kick close look at what he has planned for that. You want the same page, literally, and as I could. I could look at those things, and so did you. He could also, of course, you know, just the okay, this is yet this is what he wants. Okay, got it. And so then the coordination and the communication was all very, I'd say, very respectful and intelligent and, you know, kind of teamwork. I you could assume that everyone was going to do it their absolute best, you know, and to provide what was needed. So they weren't very many, you know, like resting, you know, disappointments or anything. There was also, especially with the departed, which I not will not especially, but more so than a lot of other films. There he, Marty, was always open to ad libs. He liked the opportunity for the actors to just to kind of wing in and be themselves and be the character and just go there a little bit. Yeah, I mean it was both a combination of the actors what their instinct was about the scene or you know, and you can get, you know, three good takes and then just say, you know, I'll just say whatever you want, kind of and it's all and so then something really genius comes out of that freedom and in this sort of like a license to just bad. Live actors do enjoy that, especially if they're, you know, they're into their character and the and the scene in the moment. It's just it's natural to leave that open. So that there was a fair amount of that in the departed because it's, you know, it's a contemporary, relatively contemporary, common people's exchange, you know, something like a Shakespeare play or even...

...like the aviator. In a sense, it had it was a formalized because of the setting and that, you know, the historical aspects. With the advent of digital cameras, I'm sure nowadays you can just like take a picture of the room and then reference back to that, but when, before that, with film stock, would you like keep notes of where every piece of paper is, or how would you? How would you go back, since you couldn't reference the previous material? Yes, going back. Yes, got it down. Sketch it on the paper on the page. You are my script, descript and pride script had a ton of little x's and crosses and arrows and jots of colors and lh left hand whatever. But there also was the possibility to take polaroids right that first camera we use. They were handy, absolutely, so we would just get them. I mean, you know, you had to like pick a time when, you know, the sets and props kind of got to the point where they were in like process of shooting, not just prep or you know, and we want to get a picture of the actor or actress, you know, when the hair is, when the hair is when it starts in the way hair, the hair is when it's halfway through, because then it go to lunch and you want to make sure it looks the same when you come back or, as I say, come back weeks later to do the next scene. And so but other departments would also take polaroids, you know, pair makeup board or always, you know, be on top of that. But that moment to moment thing, it's was a jot or a polaroid until about, yeah, through the S and been early S, I guess, it evolved. Certainly, and Yeah, getting a nice digital camera that would just work fast and more a more detail in a sense. Then polaroid was great. So with the departed, if you could speak on how long that shoot was, if you can remember that, and how much of it is studio versus location shooting and sort of has the amount of studio versus location shooting? Has that changed over time? I think it's it's relatively similar between like, say, the well, actually we shot the departed in two thousand and five, so that's not that long ago. Yeah, and it was. It was I think it was to take us about three months to shoot. You know, I don't remember, but you know, I don't have my paperwork to sure. Yeah, the day help, but we shot the offices in a sense, right. Those were in on a stage because a lot of time was there. And so it is cheaper and easier and more convenient to build this sets that are going to be used quite a bit and have it in studio. It is very efficient in many ways right, to have key, you know, locations or rooms that you need to be in for a good deal of time, to have them built, and then it's easier and faster and cheaper to shoot things that you just going to once or that you have to established, like the you know, the landmark, we say, then you just go. So it was it was combination. I think it might have been a little bit more, few more days on a stage then on locations. Maybe, maybe a little more than that on stage. And it's interesting. I realize that. You know, once you finish a job, you just you don't think about how many days it was for more than a few days, you know, and you just happy that it you did it, you know, and get some wrestling spend time with your family. So, in reference to keeping track of dialog, when an actor strays from the script, are you just like nudging the director and being like look here, they said this instead of this, or are you talking to the actor and saying, Hey, here's the line? Yes, that's something which is worked out pretty much day...

...one between the director and the actor. which which does her she prefer and I just do it at however they want it. There is that. I have worked with directors and in fact Cindy Lavett was like this. He said, if there's an error in the dialog, tell me, I'll tell them. He thought it was better. You know that he was the person that was talking to that, but less distracting and more kind of consistently focused. If he was the one that gave the note to the the actors. Great, so I just do that, and it varies, you know, obviously you know, as freelancers we work with lots of different people. So I would just find out what was so preferred. And also sometimes there would be a question where even the director might even ask me, how is that that good? I said, well, forgot the line about the car. Did I tell them? Now let them do one more then when we feel a much matter, you know, or yeah, tell whatever, you know. It all it all has to be worked through. You sure? So are there directors who openly ignore continuity errors? And is that? Is that a blessing or a curse to you? It's all fine. There there are there are instances where it sort of doesn't matter if you're doing a scene and they kind of senses that we're going for it right. Well, there. You know, this is a spense specific example, but there may be a scene where the end of it is kind of you know, there's something that's gotten kind of frantic between the characters, whatever, and so the actor might say I want to just dump this desk over, just smash it in. They're like, okay, so what they will do in a case like that is make sure that they have what leads up to it, like get three or four book takes of everything leading up to this point where he wants to smash the desk so that that it can be done, and that's it's over. That's the cut. We're moving on once, once we smash up the desk. But most things are flexible to be able to be done again with a perfection of the dialog or a even a direction by the director. Just just say, you know, just say whatever you want. Let's just say whatever, doesn't matter if there's a way to, you know, just control it in the sense that you get what you need. That has to be established and once you get that you can just sort of throw it into a an Adlib that can change the dialog say whatever. There are instances where I have I felt that the actor made, it may be made a mistake. That wouldn't be it. We probably should get one with the right of the other character, you know right something like that would not be good. But usually they're there's they're not, you know, they study the lines, they rehearse them. Most actors are pretty conscientious that way. But there can be just like an omission of something or just something. You know that that contradicts something that we changed, you know, last week because they wanted to do this and now the script says that, but we should change it so it suits what we already established. You know, will just last week, rather stuff like that. There's subtleties, but it's not that, you know, it's not that stressful or complicated. So for the departed, were there any scenes or anything about that project that you found particularly challenging at that time? Every day making a movie is challenging. The HMM for pretty much everybody. I mean not in this serious way, but it's there's a lot of moving parts, there's time pressure. You know, it's expensive to have a lot of people. They're working and lighting and all the other factors. Right, he is. Everything has to be respected and everyone's time, it ever, has to be respected because it's substantial. Yeah, I mean if the scene has...

...if a scene has a lot of people in it and there's something like big that's going to happen, like an explosion or something or that, you know that that's nake its sense. You just want to make sure that you know that you get what you need before you blow it up or before you you know, actually a car crash is nerve reckon, you know, but it's like, to a certain extent, what's going to happen is going to happen, you know, and that everybody's trained in calm and focused, but you just have to sort of hope, you know, that okay, everything goes well, but nothing wrong happens. There's there's a possibility to fix certain things in both you know, you can erase color or something in is in a brain. You can cut away, cut back. You know, there's there's a flexibility, but every scene has certain pressure that you get it right, whether it's action, dialog. You know, you maybe so. You also worked on Oliver Stones Wall Street and we were wondering what that was like. That was a great script, you know, great cast. Oh my God, I just really, really enjoyed working with all the casts in the team and Oliver is very, very smart, very focused. I mean he just kept on it. You know, I felt like this is a great script, we can't go along here, just do it, you know. And there again, you know, wasn't really complicated in that it was relatively present and relatively you know, normal human interactions and so forth. It was a challenge to keep really, really focused because it was such a was such a great opportunity to work on something, you know like that smart and just don't mess up, you know. So I just hung in there like everyone else. They know, every day. So you've also worked on law and order, trial by jury and Svu, and we were wondering what it's like to work on a television series. A couple of things that are a little bit different about televion series is that you you're not like on this adventure your you go to you go pretty much to the studio every day and then you shoot locations that are relatively convenient, right. So you go home at night, which you don't on a, you know, a big movie. You're all over the world or you're in two or three different cities, whatever. Different tracks can just come up, you know, when you accept a future film on a TV series, you get to be sort of more like a team, like a friendly group of filmmakers that you know, the whole crew and ye asked to a certain extent, to great extent that you know your your valid set of people that are doing this series, not just one episode, not, you know, just we're just you just going for it. So it your life is a little more predictable and you know you have more time to develop, you know, working rapport with, you know, with the same people, and so it's a little more sort of peaceful. But you know, the shows are not as sort of dramatically exciting at something like, you know, the aviator where you're crashing a plane. Oh, you know, I did the courtroom stuff, but I love the courtroom work because it the dialog so intelligent. You know, it's really challenging and you it takes some thought, like to just even, you know, sort of follow wing where this is going, and you know it's it's yeah, it's great. So you have some directorial credits, one film called tomorrow and another one called devastation that, according to IMDB, is in preproduction and we were wondering about those. I shot directed tomorrow, which I was hired to do by these wonderful British filmmakers, actors, writers. I I first met these people, these producers and in it was about two thousand and twelve when one of my screenplays when a prize at a film festival and I went over there and I...

...met these these shows. They were doing film festivals but also writing and developing school. So I was actually hired to direct tomorrow, and so I didn't have to worry about the producing or raising the money or you know. They were in charge of getting that done. The too, lead actors wo the script and it was excellent. I just hung in there and made the movie. Yeah, I was was a dream come true. It wasn't. It was a really good script and it wasn't insanely difficult insert and technical ways. You know, there were not that much in terms of visual effects or which I don't mind. I've used to doing those. But you know, it just was I love the idea of doing just shooting a drama, you know that, and which had also had some humor and a personal connection. You know, it was it was just a tremendous opportunity. Yeah, it was. We want a lot of festival prizes and they had a hundred screen release in the UK. That getting in the the UKE. The the release in the US was a little hard because for a small indie film it's a big country, big market. But we'll see. You know, the point of the the actor, writers producers is really dedicated, so we'll see. So that was just a wonderful, wonderful experience. I loved working with the actors and, you know, the staging in the you know, just just creating the drama and the beauty of the story. So your upcoming film, was it as a similar situation where you were, where you're contracted to to direct? Yes, I was contacted and and and it sends hired. However, it's still in preproduction and it was moving forward a year and change ago when the pandemic hit. So it was put on hold. So be it, that's life. And but I'm still in touch with the writer, producer and all good. You know, we'll just we just have to see. I can't predict exactly what's going to happen, but it's also a wonderful script and I know that that is one thing I am just us to spoiled Brat when it comes to is that I would not want to direct something that I didn't think was beautiful. You know, HMM, my father. Yeah, and I mean beautiful in the human, dramatic sense. HMM, Trent is, do you think it's time for the big KUNA, as it were, the big KHUNA question, the grand finale? Yeah, okay, so we like to ask all of our guests at the end. What the last great movie they watched was? Okay, well, I recently watched hair. Oh, we look Moorman's hair, which I thought it was wonderful. It was just this wild, you know, hippie. I also, you know, I have been watching, I re watched the departed. That a patent. Yeah, that, and I just because I like it. I mean I had a I had a dvd of it, but I really I just wanted to see it again, just to relive it. And who was kind of convenient because you guys wanted to talk to me about that. Sure, yeah, it's a great movie. Yeah, did you ever, under any circumstances, revisit the film's You've worked on? Are Only when your podcast. No, I have, you know, thought about them, talk to friends or whatever family about them, you know, and we watch them. Sure, that's kind of normal, just to say, you know what. Yeah, people watch prints of the city again, HMM or and I watched other things that I just felt like and I'm going to do more. I can get him from Ante flicks. It sometimes of the I have, you know, but seeing the actors kind of remembering everything and and the moments. But there is also something that happens where when you're shooting a film, you know you want to get it done. You want to get it done right. It's not like watching a film. It's right, it's so. It's a whole other mental and emotional state. HMM. Well, you've worked on some great films, so it would only make sense to want to rewatch them. Trent, you want to take us out, sure. Thank you so much to our...

...guest, Martha Pinson. She's worked on such films as Wall Street, dressed to kill the aviator and our film for today, Martin Scorsese's that about it. Thanks so much for coming on. You you're excellent. You're wonderful. Oh, thank you so much for having me. I hope so. Yeah, what a wonderful interview. Would you're not say that joker. Ah, I really joy talking with the script supervisor, or Martha Pinson, as you may have heard, worked on all sorts of great films. Enough of that. Just took her talk with the Doppler Act and and your version. I was just going to say most of the effect was moving back and forth towards the MIC. I guess I see. I guess it was Nice of you to use that physics term from junior year. You've really been saving that in your back pocket. Hey, I just learned about the doppler effect in my sound class last semester. Actually Trent in physics in high school. They they just said it was the thing with ambulances is that they comparison they made with you and sound class. That's my impression of an ambulance. Out of ten, what would you read it? Here's my impression of a boring scientists explaining the doppler effect to the listeners at home who may have not taken high school physics or college level sound class. So let me just put on my glasses. So will. The doppler effect is like the science and what you can hear here is Trent Al Gere trying to remember what the doppler effect is, and so he's kind of just saying random jargon to make up for his total and utter lack of knowledge, which is not new for Trent. He often talks like this. He generally doesn't know anything and kind of just says words to make up for his vast, vast intellectual inadequacies. So next week on craft services, parth and I will be doing a departed discussion. Oh wait, wait, oh, what does cushion? Oh, the departed discussion. So next week we're going to be discussing the debated it, about it, about it without Martha Pinson. Yeah, no, she couldn't make it that day. Unfortunately. Super Busy, you know, working with Maddy. But if you like our show, two weeks from now, fifty episode, spectacular. I don't mean to be this guy, it's going to be spectacular part. Am I wrong about that? Wait, do you think it's only going to be wonderful or stupendous or whatever? Absolutely not. Know. It's going to be spectacular. I'm very, very excited for our fifty episode. I can't believe we've made it. That bar such a big milestone for us. I'm so proud. Yeah, no, it was one of my favorite interviews that we've done. Yeah, like this one was. Yeah, so that will be with the second unit director of Sam Remy's army of darkness, Doug Leffler, great man, I'd say as good a man as Martha Pinson is a good woman and Ayo Heyo. So, with that all being said, thanks for thanks tuning in. We appreciate your time and you know what else? We'd appreciate tell the people you have a strict list of orders and if they don't abide by them, there will be consequences. So just speak on that. So here's here's what we want you to do, and when we say want, we say require. Of You. Need from you is, you know, step one. Your you're probably listening to this on some sort...

...of podcasting platform, apple podcasts, which is a good start. Yeah, what we need you to then do is, after listening to all of our episodes, of course, yes, every single one. You must listen to. You could skip the first one, I want you to rate US five stars. I want you to follow us. I want you, too, on Apple podcasts, give us a good rating and a good review. I want you to say really nice things about us. But if you can't do that, just say really guys things about me and, yeah, and Bob's your uncle. Follow us on Instagram, follow us on twitter. We are pretty active. So part you were I mean, I agree with everything you were just saying, but you were telling me off Mike about this new, like large weapon that you've acquired and that how you would have no choice but to deploy this weapon if, if certain listeners were to disobey our requests are, I guess, a nice way of saying our strict demands and that this is a sort of lethal weapon. So what I'll say about that is we may or may not have gotten in some hot water when we first acknowledged the existence of said weapon, and our legal department has informed me that I have to unequivocally deny that I have such a weapon in my possession, and I would I would just like to say that there is no way that I would ever tell you or confirm that I have a weapon, but if I did have a weapon, I would not be afraid to use it should my list of demands not be met. All right, part, I am seeing someone is joining the call. Hi, this is a Peter from craft services hr and I waiter. Peter. Not Right now. We're recording an episode. Oh, but part I just wanted to tell you about how you can't, you can't talk about the weapon on the air, that the weapon most certainly exists and it is capable of masters tracking. Idiot, where recall my fuckingoutlarding serious legal repercussions if you mention the weapon in any way, because it's not a tea private information. You've ru with this whole fucking thing. You're so dumb.

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