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Episode 49 · 1 year ago

THE DEPARTED (2006) Discussion

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent use copyrighted clips, music, and sound effects in an effort to enrage Silicon Valley investors, as a business tactic, because all press is good press, even if you are being sued by numerous hedge funds for countless internet crimes.

Edited by Trent Algayer

Without asking for too many details. Do you have anyone in with costell presently? Maybe, maybe not, maybe fuck yourself, Trent ster, high parth, what have you? Would tell me? We've been eating Nice, nice to see you. It's good to some you know, since we're an in indentured servitude sort of arrangement where you said we'll doing the pot on Tuesday morning or else. And so I had no choice but to watch the departed. What I talk you like? Had No choice but to watch all two hundred, all two hours and thirty minutes of the departed this morning. And you know, did you think an hour was a hundred minutes long for a second there, Trent? WHO's to say? But I was on a hunger strike until the end because I need to prove a point to you and myself about this. Part doesn't find it one hundreds and necessary to we watch the movies in their entirety before discussions. He just says, yeah, I'll skim it. Am I wrong? There's this accusation. Accurate. I had hot dog, chicken hot dog, for breakfast, I mean lunch, because my chicken hot a chicken hot dog. Yeah, because this is a Hindu household. So we don't it's there no red meat around. We don't partake in the meat of a cow. It's a sacred beast, exactly. So, yeah, so he got these stricken sausages and I hated them up. And so have you eaten chickens, hostages, chicken hot dogs your whole life? Yeah, has that taken the role of a standard issue hot dog? I would say so. I mean, I prefer. I've had beef before. I just I prefer chicken generally, I think, partially because I've just grew up with it more often. Did someone like sneak you beef, or did you are like, did you just decide one morning you're on a cheat on God, or like, what was what was the plan there? I'm glad you're making me do this on air, Trent, so high parts of parents. Yeah, hi, when I was younger I accidentally had beef because I didn't because it's just so caught, like at school lunch or whatever, like I didn't even know what was beef and what wasn't beef. What dish was it hidden and hot dog? I didn't know that it was. And then I it doesn't look like anything in particular. No, and I also had pepperoni on peech. I could see some how you could unknowingly consume that. So you could. If I was a child you told me Pepperoni who came from a chicken, I shrug my shoulders and say great, and you could tell me a Pepperoni came from anything and I'd probably believe you. I currently don't even know that. I believe that it comes from a cow. I mean, I feel like Pepperoni and hot dogs or two of the meat products that contain the least percentage of meat. So maybe you'll go to like partial hill. Who knows? Yeah, is that? What is that what you're afraid of? Is that what's at steak here? What going to hell? You go into the underworld? Well, Hinduism doesn't believe in the underworld. So what's like the worst case scenario? Well, I mean the Way Hindu is and works, as I just be reincarnated. The but ideas bad? Maybe. I mean the idea is that the whole idea is to not to get religious on the POD, which I'm not. The whole idea is that you do your duty and then stop getting reincarnated. Is there like a sin system? Like there isn't like Christianity? No, Oh cool, so you don't have to like go to there's no confessional, none of that. No, because the idea is the entire world is a construct and an illusion. To break free from Hinduism and it's purest belief believes that there is no god, Whoa and that you can believe whatever. The whole idea is, basically that your belief system is all just a crutch for you to stay sane in a sort of way. Well, listeners, that's the sort of content you signed up for. Wow, let's cut to the show, the movie portion enough, spiritual of our movie show, of our film podcast. All right, bye, but also welcome to the show. Thanks for coming. Welcome back to grab services, where we talk about the movies. This is our show. Each week we talked about a film and hopefully have a remember all that film to talk with us about their experience working all the picture. Last week we talked about the departed with its script supervisor, Mattha Pinson. I'm sorry, what movie do we talk about with Scripts Rising Martha Pinson? So are about that rent? That a patent? Yeah, we discussed the depated with with Martha Pinson. That was last week's episode. And it was really freaking dope. Right, I would say so. I would say dope, cool, epic sauce Bro would be allnir talk. Turn are talking my language, I know, but we've come here to do something else. What's that?...

There's sort of like a duality of the show. There's like the formal, like hit, like hair up, like interview portion, and you know there were. They're like some old professional people. They use all their technical jargon, but then every other Sunday we let our hair down, get a little informal to shoot the shit with parth and I talk about the depoted, and what's wrong with that? You know, nothing wrong about talk about the debatted, the depot it. So how do we? How do we go about such a thing? Well, trend, where, where to begin? I'm going to tell you about the synopsis of this movie and then I'm going to tell you the budget and box office of this movie. You want to tell me the budget of box office? It's your yes, whatever is long as we follow the standard outline of the discussions that we've been using since episode one. How about you tell me? All right, so, an undercover cop and a male in the police attempt to identify each other while infiltrating an Irish gang in South Boston. This is a two thousand and six film from our friend Martin Scorsese, Maddy Maddie for short, or Mr Scorsesee, if you're long, if you learn from our last episode, I'm a good friend of Maddy and this was this is a special film. All right, parts. So since you're five years old at the time, you're definitely in the thick of the set. So tell us about the production history. Well, why don't you tell me about the budget and box office first? Yeah, I got ahead of myself. So first, your own forgot the outline of your own show. So cost ninety million dollars to make, and I read somewhere that forty five million of those dollars were actors salaries alone. And then there was a box office of two hundred ninety one point five million. And I read somewhere else that this was the third highest grossing of Martin Scorsese's films, and it didn't say with the number two number one were. I'm going to assume number one is wolf of Wall Street. What do you think number two would be? Good fellows? Maybe Hugo? Yeah, I think people really turned out for Hugo. Wait, what else could it be? Practically would be something stupid like, I don't know, the aviator. I don't mean to call the a babe, stupid. I've never seen the aviator and I look it up and, through the magic of editing, in the span of a single second, acquired this knowledge. I definitely didn't edit like a minute or two of you searching this information up. So please tell me what this knowledge is. I have the answer here in front of me. Do you want to take a final guest and like lock it in like R on, deal or no deal? I think top grossing is Wolf of Wall Street, and I'm going to say second is good fellows. Number two is shutter island. Ah, fuck the reef, the Pott it for is the aviator and just while we're here. Five is gangs of New York. Six is hug you. So Cape. Seven, Cape Fear, eight, casino, nine, the color of money, and ten as good fellows. Yeah, I sorry, fans at home, I'm sure you got more than you bargain for there, but sorry for the history lesson. Speaking of Party of history. Yeah, Nice Segue, cool content, production history. So in January two thousand and three Warner Brothers, producer Brad Gray and actors producer Brad Pitt, bought the rights to remake the Hong Kong film internal affairs for looes in front five million dollars. Would you say infernal affairs? I think it's internal affairs. Hold on, let me search that up. We need a research team. Yeah, it's we need some. It's internal affairs. Well, you're the one with the F there. I copied it from wait, oh, wait, no, it is. It is infernal affairs. Oh there's also a mobe called internal affairs. Yeah, because I saw it somewhere else listed as infernal affairs and I thought I was going crazy there for a second. I'm going to I'm going to start you. You are often right on this show and I start. Didn't want to be wrong again. Go for it, parth, confidently. Say It like you've got it the first time around. In January twenty, fuck me, in January two thousand and three, Warner Brothers, producer Brad Gray and actor Brad Pitt brought the rights to remake the Hong Kong Film Infernal Affairs for Media Asia for one point seven five million dollars. William Monahan was secured as a screenwriter, and then Martin Scorsese, who liked his script, came on board as director. In March of two thousand and four it was announced that Scorsese would be remaking the movie and setting it in Boston, with Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt slated to star in it. Pitt was sensitively scheduled to play Sullivan, but later declined the role, saying that a younger actor should play the part and decided to produce the film. Only and in favor of this movie start in Babble. Scorsese's longtime associate, Kenneth Lonergan, who's also the director of Manchester by the sea, suggested Matt Damon, who grew up in Boston, to replace Brad Pitt. Scorsese asked Jack Nicholson to play Costello. He wanted the film to have a little...

...something more than the usual gangster film, and screenwriter Monahan came up with the idea of basing the Cap Costello character on Irish American gangster Whitey Bulger. This gave the screenplay an element of realism and an element of dangerous uncertainty because of the wide ranging carte blanche the FBI gave bulger in exchange for revealing information about fellow gangster. The movie was officially green lit by Warner Brothers in early two thousand and five and began shooting in spring of two thousand and five. Some of the film was shot in location in Boston, but most of the movie, for budgetary logistical reasons, was shot in New York City on locations and sets, as it had taxed incentives that Boston did not. Trent hit me with some fun fact. All Right, so technical consultant on the film was Tom Duffy, who had served three decades on the Bostom Police Department, particularly as an undercover detective investigating the Irish mob. Leonardo DiCaprio called as one on one scene with Jack Nicholson quote, one of the most memorable moments of my life, beautiful. When receiving the top award from the directors guilds of America for this film, N Scrosise said this quote. Is the first movie I've ever done with a plot, which I don't necessarily agree with either. Martin scrusase really wanted Al Pacino for the role of Costello because he had never worked with Pecina before, but he turned it down. I could see it. I like that Nicholson's in it, but it could have worked in I feel like there's always been in like s movies, in you're either a Piccino guy or Daniro guy. My whole life I've been a staunched Deniro Guy, but I'll Paccino's pretty freaking pretties, pretty freaking cool. I agree. I agree. Hey, originally this remake was planned with Brad Pitt as Colin Sullivan and Tom Cruise as billy costigan part. Do you see it? I see it, and it would be interesting to have cruis re team up with scores set busy, but I think, excuse my ignorance, when did Tom Cruise work last with Martin Scorsese color of money? Okay, and in the early s. So it's Brad Pitpin in his scorsese movie. I don't think he has but but it would have been interesting to see them ree team up. But I'm glad the the casting is the way that it is in this movie. Tom Cruise, I feel like, sneaks into every casting. What if that we do on the show? Yes, he was considered for everything, or maybe he just has a lot. He has a team of people going out and writing on Imdba Trivia that he was once considered for every male lead role. That makes sense. Moving on, Jack Nicholson refused to wear a Boston red sox hat during filming and instead war his New York Yankees Hat. This reminded me of when Ben Affleck did the inverse on gone girl and refused to wear the Yankees hat and in substitute war a New York mets hat. I don't understand these a list actors refusing to wear hats. If it's like Geo geography or I can do this geographically gee, if it's geographically sound with the character and what team that character would like. Well, it's all part of you know, pride. So and I really wanted to be Yankees Cap, but, being from Boston and not being very professional as an actor, been refused to wear Yankees Cap. And we, I mean did not come to blows, but we had to shut down production for four days as we negotiated with Patrick White so over what would be the best thing for the movie, what Patrick Thought would be the best way to meet the requirements of the production and something that his client could live with, which I thought was entirely. I'm professional. Four days, four days, four days, four days, four days. MARN scrissays had a risinly one to cast a known actress, either Kate Winslet, Emily Blunt, Hillary Swank or Jennifer Aniston for the part of Madeline. Who can you see of those listed, and are you happy we got via? Yes, I like, I'm very happy we got vera. I could see Kate Winslett, yeah, because she's on the new mayor of Easttown thing and she does the the pencil that she just she does the Pennsylvania accent. She kills it, so she could do a Boston accent, I'm sure. Yeah, I don't think Jennifer Aniston works and this at all. Absolutely not. No, no, I like, I could like. I think Emily Blunt's a great actress, but I think she would be very young. Yeah, especially fifteen years ago, she would seem very young. Yeah, and Vera. Vera seems like an old, foxy therapist woman, and that's like part of it, you know. I mean I don't know that I call her old, which she doesn't seem, but she doesn't seem specifically young either. She feels very established. All right, Marn Scros says he did not realize this was a remake of a Hong Kong movie until after he agreed to direct it. The word Fuck and all of its derivatives are used two hundred and thirty eight times. I know that Wolf of Wall Street...

...and holds the record with more and not hold the record, but it is, I believe, the second or third place for most fucks in a movie. Was it? Was it not the first time? There's least that there's a documentary. There's a documentary, documentary fuck. You can edit that out. Edit that out. I can't. I just put on my show. Okay, there's a there's a documentary called about the word Fuck. Okay, that has more and I I don't know, South Park, bigger, longer and uncut has more. I might be swapping those two. But yeah, the first best picture, Oscar winner of the twenty one century that wasn't released on VHS in the United States and the first to be released on the shortlived HD DVD format. Part did you buy stock in HD DVD and, if so, how are your savings? Being a toddler at the time, I invested all of my savings and have come out with little to no profit. Yeah, and how's Your vhs stock? Oh it's out, it's through the roof. Could you see VHS has coming back in a way that like record players have, or is it too much of a jump? It too much of a convenience UMP? Well, it's not just a convenience jump. The thing is the reason record players are coming back it's because they actually hold a higher quality, like vinyls, they actually have more information, whereas VHS is way more cumbersome to manage and also is just worse quality. Yeah, also having a physically rewind. It's pretty terrible. I know that some of the fast facts you listed about the sound quality superiority of record players or fat's factually true, but I just you can't you can't help but feel pretentious when you say those words. Sure, I'm just saying that's the reason why people like them, and of course there's the Nice added you know, getting to put the vinyl in and whatever, but I don't think there's there's very little nostalgia I have for VHS. I'm sad that DVD's are dying and I almost wish that I had gotten on the Blu Ray bandwagon earlier, because at least with blue rays. You can make the record argument that. Oh the quality. Yeah, I have nothing to say. I jumped on the Blu Ray bandwagon way before, at the right time, at the exact right time. You bought plenty of Blu Ray stock. Is there anything above Blu Ray Superior or K and, which is still Blu Ray, but it's do need a K player? Yeah, you do. That sounds like a sham. It's not. Well, I thought so too, but we bought, my dad bought this Oled TV and for K BLU ray player and we watched tenant and K on it and and there's a noticeable there's a noticeable difference. I really thought there wouldn't be. But isn't a K disk like thirty bucks? It's becoming cheaper. But yes, cool, it's not that. I think it's twenty five now. But yeah, want to do one star views? Yeah, let's do it. Let's do it. You want me to start with one. We got this tract if I the format wars, another cheap knockoff of the real deal. Cheap knockoff. Not only do I hold more day than you, I'm smaller and more compact. To Huh, pay to break it to your kid. All through history man has favored large things, large horses, large bank accounts, large ice cream Sundays. Nobody's gonna want this. Size matters. Laser discs are everywhere now. Yeah, good luck having people switched to DVD. Probably stands for disc. That's very dumb. WHO IT stands for? Digital? Versatile disc. You'll know DVD soon enough from Julian Owens. Seven months ago he wrote in all lowercase. Thought it it was good, Fella, period. Why isn't period disappointed? So I think you're doing. I think what you're trying to say is thought it was good. Fella. Wasn't disappoint I think you mun to say. I thought this was good fellaw's wasn't disappointed. But, yeah, what do you think was happening here? Because something was wrong. I think they did it very much attention to what the the you know, they were typing. I think this was done on the phone and they have fat face. Oh, Oh, I was I thought you were going to say it was like a bad voice translation, as in, I feel like people don't really use voice translate. I don't, nobody I know does. I can't imagine going through the effort of writing a review and then not going through the time to proofread, especially when it's one sentence, or I guess, since they put three different three set, it's three sentences, but they're there. are a total of six words.

All right, I know. The next one. It's by Jasmine Chan. It was from four days ago. freshwoman. For Jasmine. It's a it says only straight men would enjoy this and like, I mean, she's kind of right. What? No, she's not. Actually, my mom likes this movie more than I do. So I think that breaks your little hypothesis there. Jasmine, friend of the show and previous guest of the show, chloe did laugh, is a ginormous fan of the departed. So that's a straight woman. So you know I but I believe I'm a straight man and I wasn't. I mean, as we'll get into later, I don't think. I don't see this as a wolf of all street type movie where the wrong kind of people, because the wrong kind of people reclaiming this movie would have to be like Irish gangsters from Boston, and I don't know if that's a wide enough net. Yeah, yeah, it's a really specific target audience. All Right, I want me to say the last one. So this one's from Martin Knight ten months ago. Muddled acting, poor theme, gobbled diction, pseudo aggression. Wife fell asleep twice in the first ninety minutes. Frankly boring. Amazing to have such stars and the director putting their good names to this amateurish fiasco. Martin really set out to use every vote Ad Woord he knew. He went to the the SAURUS and he succeeded. Do you think he padded himself on the back after he used the words pseudo? I think so. And also, and I don't know when I say pseudo aggression, it's macro aggression. It's very clear, visible. It's not. It's not debatable. I could see this being pseudo intellectual or something, but just to make it make more sense. I don't think this movie is pseudo intellectual. But but to say poor theme, not that they've established several themes and that they were poor, but just all together one bad theme and its entirety. And he also seems to have a problem with the way the actors say their lines. I guess he has a night's fall with the Boston accent. Because of gobbled diction. I think he wanted to use the word gobbled and diction. I agree. I think Martin is just going from film to film and ripping them limb from limb and and you know it's is highlighting his the words and his thesaurus as he goes. Now it's time for us to talk about what worked in this movie. Trent, you watched it just now, right, yeah, you skimmed it, I'm sure. Okay, the first thing, the first thing on my list is the main cast Leo, Damon Nicholson, three my all time favorites. And then right under the main cast bowl point it says supporting cast. You Got Mark Wahlberg, Alec Baldwin, via there. Ever, everyone's killing it. Yeah, tell me what some of your earliest points are or what your thought on my earliest point was. I agree. I think that the cast, the cast, is perfect for Martin Scorsese. I think that they are able to because he's got a very specific style and I think he always chooses actors for whatever movie he's doing that will be able to speak the dialog and act completely correctly for the type of movie that he's making, because he's a very, very director. So I think that's part of the reason why I say that Tom Cruise? I don't know. I think you know. I think everybody cast was completely correct for their role. It's a shame mark Wahlberg, as Trent just now found out just before recording, is a horrible racist. Yeah, parth and for me that there's a whole wikipedia subsection labeled hate crimes. So, yeah, all fair. We were talking about how hard heartbroken we are over overbooking nights over this movie, because I got on the air and I said, are we going to talk about how how Awesome Mark Wahburg is? And he said we can talk about it in the safety of our own home, but on the air he's not. He's not the right man to give praise to right now. That being said, he is. I mean he gives some of the funniest lines in the movie, but it is a shame that the man himself is has to hate minority groups. It's not. It's not ideal, yeah, it's not. It's I I love his acting work, but it's not a good look for him. He can just go off and just not do anything. But this is not a mark Wahlberg podcast, but is a depoted podcast. Unless you're still holding a grudge over the Alec Baldwin Wards with friends him refusing to get off the plane dispute a few years ago. I I think he's just as good. How's your wedding coming alone? Great, great, she's a doctor. That's have standing. Yeah, marriage is an...

...important party geting ahead. Let's people know you're not a homo. Every guy seems more stable. People see the ring, they think, at least somebody can stand this. Out of a bitch lady see the ring, they no, immediately. It must have some cash. If you clock, must work. That's working overtime Lydia. Thank you. Yes, I think. I think again. Everybody's absolutely correct for their role. I think everybody's this is a very fast moving, fast talking script and I think everybody's got there. You know, we just recorded our Steve Jobs discussion similar to that movie, where every actor is on point, knows exactly what movie they're making and is sort of moving in rhythm in conjunction with everybody else. That's kind of the same thing that's happening here, and you know, this is a really good script. I think so. Speaking on that point, my next bullet point says the ability to cross cut any moment and I think that's what makes the momentum work so well is that they can do kind of like impartial scenes or essentially cut whenever they want, after whatever funny line I think is funniest, and just go to the other character and basically by themselves time to go wherever they want to go with the other character without having to explain the narrative basis of it. Yeah, and I think there's so many sequences in this movie, in this movie that traverse a long period of time or cut between these several characters. And you know, Martin Skur says he's well known for his use of music, but it's really, really good here. It's it sets the tone properly and it it. It creates a lot of movement between scenes. You know, we were remarking earlier off air, Trent and I about how the Irish theme that music. You mean the pirates song, DA, Da Dada. Yeah, that song. It plays a million tie with the move I I kind of hate it. I love that song. But here's the thing. I think he makes use of these recurring music use in a really in a great way. I think he's able to use all all aspects of film language to propagate this really well. Written Story and Funny Story. The first time I saw this movie I actually didn't really like it, or at least I really liked the second half, but found that the first half was kind of disjointed and thought Martin Scorsese went a little crazy with some editing decisions. I still think he kind of. You know, there's weird like fadeouts that cut straight into the next scene. There's lots of weird editing techniques that are used, but they bother me less because I think once you become engaged with the characters and story and know what the movies doing, it's much easy or to engage with it. Speaking of music, he is I read somewhere that this was the third scross se film where he used give the shelter. On one hand I like that because he's like a fucking like this song. I'm going to put it in all of my most classic movies, but other hand I like not self obsessive, but it just seems weird. I can imagine any other director thinking and you know, three movies over their career. Problem he was playing the same song the only, the only time I can really think of that, and it's not over three movies. It's just too is I think Tarantino reuses some songs unless it's like referential to another movie, but in this at that point just don't use it, like why do you want to think of another movie while watching this move? But yeah, I do think it's a little weird that he keeps but again, it works in this movie. It's not like it's improperly placed. One of my more minor points says, quote, Leonard DiCaprio beating people up, which watching people get beat up in general is pretty cool, and then watching an a plus lister like Leo beat people up is even better. Yes, and I think that. I think cruise was slated to potentially be Leo's part, and I think Leo the Nice Magic Trick of it is that he is this a lister but he's also got this weird soft quality to him and they use that well because he's supposed to be scared and freaking out all the time because he's, you know, a mole and a rat inside of the criminal enterprise, and you see him early on sort of beating people up, but he there's they've got this nice balance where he you believe that he's able to beat people up he also believe that he's not that good beating people up. He it's all...

...kind of a show for him and that he's not he's really trying to play up the tough guy factor, and I don't know if that would happen with someone else. So part I'd like to introduce our next edition of trends confused. Part explains, and it's for a major plot point. How does the Leonardo DiCaprio find himself in the position of like, he like? He goes to the police academy and it seems like his intentions are are pure, and then Alec Baldwin and Mark Wahlberg just say we know they made Martin Sheen. Martin Sheen are yeah, they say, we know that you are a rat and therefore we are going to like offer you this elaborate deal. But, like, I don't think. I don't think that there are that he's a rat. I don't think they think he's a rat. I think that was all sort of a hazing process where, if you can, you have to be able to upstand Serge Dignum to be able to take up this job, and this is also a job where, should something go wrong, nobody will know that you exist, nobody will know what you've done, nobody will be able to help you. It's a high stress thing that nobody wants to take, and so they're giving it to this one guy who's who has pure intentions and has little to no connections. So they want so they can throw them into this environment and let him do this job. I guess what I'm confused is because it kind of seems like he's holding they're holding him hostage, but at the same time it seems like Leo Willingly agrees to go and almost immediately wants out and then they don't let him out for the next two and a half hours. I think it's meant to be that he wants to be in the police department. However he can and this is his way in. But they basically say to him because some most of your relatives are criminals, that must mean that you are also a criminal and therefore we're not going to let you be a cop in the standard fashion, but you have to go to jail for a year and then you can be a cop in this more complex way, in a sort of way where we can kill you or race you at any time. Well, I think that's the idea is that it seems needlessly dangerous. He's should find another line of work. It's meant to be that he wants he is a good man. Ultimately, that's what screws them over. But I think the idea is that it's all this hazing process and he this is all part of his initiation into this job. So do we want to give us spoiler alert now? Because because sure, I mean, this is a what, fifteen year old movie? Yeah, and you're thirty minutes into the episode. So if you've come this far and you haven't seen the movie yet, we're going to talk about some people who die. And if anyone dies, who knows? Everyone could survive the film. Maybe everybody ends this film a happy customer. Yeah, Leo and Matt Shake Hands and they say, I'm glad we could put all this gang cops, when that's so different you and I. Yeah, all right, so now let's get into the fact here. Here's my last my last point. It says I really respect movies that aren't afraid to kill everyone. And to elaborate on this, I feel like a big complaint for film and TV now is like they're too precious with their characters. They are afraid to kill anyone. It feels like there's no stakes and this movie, over the course, I mean mostly in the in the in the ladder half, kill everyone and do it pretty mercilessly, and the fact that they do it so suddenly and don't like make a big fuss about it and it's like silent when people die rather than with a big booming score. And I think it's awesome. Yeah, and I think it shows. I like the way that you put it of almost unrelenting at towards the end where every buddy I think it kind of shows like this is the cost of all of this criminality, getting involved in this world at all. You know, whether you're on the good or the bad of it, it'll screw you over in some regard. Even Nicholson, who we find out has been working with cops the whole time, he gets fucked over and dies. When I was your age, they would say we could become cops or criminals. Today, what I'm saying is this, when you're facing a loaded gun, what's the difference? I think that by the time you get to the point where Leo gets to the gets the phone and he and Matt Damon are on the phone call together and then they immediately hang up that from that point on onwards, I think the movie's perfect up until then, which is a lot of the movie, and I don't want to make it sound like I don't like the stuff preceding that. A lot of that move,...

...a lot of the movie is kind of it is very jumpy and I could hear meandering. Yeah, I don't think it's meandering so much as it is a little like I'm not entirely sure what the focus is meant to be. I don't think me because when I think of a meandering movie it seems like the movie doesn't know what's supposed to be happening, and I don't think that's the case here. I think that sometimes it just is too jumpy. I think in films something I really value is a like a a sort of cause and effect structure. And I don't want to be too straightforward, but if one scene leads me directly into the next scene, I kind of love it, and this is the opposite of that. Yeah, but I mean I again, I guess that's why I like it at that point because once those two pads intersect of Damon and DiCaprio. That's when you know they're they're pads constantly start intersecting with you, with each other. The other thing that I think I have a problem with would be Vera Farmiga's character because, I just said, the whole Romantic subplot as an I love I like her performance and I like part of her. I like that she's in the movie. I just don't think I think there's either too much or not enough of it. I think you didn't need the romance aspect between her and DiCaprio. I like the stuff with her and Damon it because it's not really playing any major part in the movie. It's, you know, whatever. You know, there's not. It's not even a conversation between Leo and and Matt that you know. If if, during the whole movie some like the girlfriend is cheating on the boyfriend, you expect for the the two men to discuss that at some point. And what's weird about it is that whole thing where she cheats on him. It kind of this pointless I don't really know why it happens in the movie. And then whose baby is it in the end and you don't know is it meant to like I think. I think it's meant to be unambiguous, that it's meant to be Damon's baby and that she aborts it. But you when you add this thing that she had sex with DiCaprio, it adds this weird element to it that I kind of like her and his relationship when it was sort of what's the word platonic? Platonic, I liked it. Having it in that regard because it's a different type of relationship than what's present in the movie, and then pushing it towards this sexual one. I don't believe it. I don't think they have great chemistry. I don't believe I don't. I don't believe they have like romantic chemistry. I really have they've seen stick cut, but they kind of just suddenly make out in the kitchen once and then for the rest of the movie they're talking about their relationship as if they were like once in love or as if it was much more serious than what the film portrays. You know, ultimately the whole story shifts because dicapris sends her a male of all of the evidence, and I think that beat would have worked better had they not slept together. Is it? What is in the envelope that he gives her. I think it's the tapes that he's been but but then he sends the tapes or to Matt Damon's House with his now he sends it, he sends it to her, but it has Matt Damon's name on it. It says Colin or what. Oh, oh, wait, W I think that's meant to be that he's saying like, Oh, I've got you and he's going to send that around. Oh yeah, I agree. I have a I have a note here which I'm not you're going to like. I like that the camera is always moving, or at least so it seems. But I wrote that there was a lack of a distinctive visual style as an it's kind no, no, no, no. Editing is one one thing, but like the cinematography and it feels invisible, which someone argue. I would hundred percent disagree with that one. I don't really know how you can think that, because it's constant. It's got this I don't know, it's a very distinct type. I feel like Scorsese has a very sort of quick type of movement, even beyond the editing where his cameras are moving. It really fast speeds. They're moving and zooming, they've got these fast pans and I as think he goes too hard on that in the first half. And I get the the want to push things very far or very fast so that, you know, you lock the audience in, but I think he goes a little too hard on that. I think in like an inherent flaw with the plot of the movie is it so much of the dialog has done via phone call, and I think this movie does a good job of trying to make like one shots of people walking and talking on the phone, a cutting back and forth, as interesting as possible. But I think it does suffer from too much phone call syndrome, especially when I didn't notice that. I didn't notice that so much, but I...

...agree that. I think they make it as natural as possible. Do you think that this film is too long and has too many characters? I don't. I don't think it's too I think if there was anything you could short and it would have to be in the first half. Yeah, but I I don't think it's over stuff. There's there's a difference between being dense and being overwrought or like just too long, and I think this is a very dense movie, but I think it's kind of like the dark knight to me, where it's almost got like a five act structure. It's like there's so much happening, but all of it, I think, other than the sex scene. If you were to take that string out, the whole thing would unwind and I don't think it would make as much sense. The sex scene feels like it should be more self aware of itself, because it's like kind of very cringe. I don't think scoresase was thinking about how cringe the sex scene was. I don't think the word cringe was a household term fifteen years ago. Am I wrong? I know every sex scene is a little bit hard to watch like at zero am on your small laptop. I don't know that I describe it as cringe, but I would say that I think it's I think there's a lot about this movie that is interesting and that is one of the few scenes that I think is not unbelievable. Who put the fucking cameras in this place? Oh, who the fuck are you? I'm the guy who does his job. You must be the other guy. The the million dollar question. Are You you more? Are you more of an Italian gangster guy, or do you prefer the Irish gangsters? Because I have my preference. I think. Confession, I've only seen two thirds of good fellows. Yeah, no, it's an embarrassing thing to hear you say and frankly, to be affiliated with you. But hurts my credibility. But that being said, I think Italian gangsters. Me Too. I like how the Cook at the Beazza you know. Well, outside of that, I read that this was one of the first or one of the few scoresase movies that takes place in current time rather than, you know, a period piece, rather than a period piece, and I feel like what makes good fellows feel so timeless is that it's a period piece and that, you know, when is it take place? The the S and s something like that. It taking place in two thousand and six makes it feel incredibly dated to me. Really, I don't have a releast problem with it in the way in the way the people dress and where their baseball caps and such, I kind of I don't know if I'm like a weird outlier. I feel like people always say that about movies with like clothing and things like that, but I don't really generally have a problem with it, because if you were to now make a movie set in two thousand and six, you would have people dressed like that. So I don't have a problem with that. The only time I ever have a problem with dating movies is cell phones. I almost prefer movies nowadays would use like Shitty's dumb phones, because those don't age. IPHONES age, you know, like sell you. Isn't it funny having dumb phones, like you said, play such a pivotal role and have them taken so sort seriously and I have the ring tones like be so ominous? Yeah, it's funny. UH, okay, speaking cell phones, let's give it up for Matt Damon for his ability to send a text on that style of phone with his phone one hards in the pocket. Get no yet let's get around with laws. That is, I would say, scientifically impossible, or at least you have to really understand the button layout and the deep bit. I'm getting an incoming message from a dead Stephen Hawking and he has confirmed that it's actually IMPOSSI. It's scientifically impossible. All right, thank you to a research team and thank you to the the go to, Stephen Hawking, for chiming and we appreciate your time. Do you think it's time, sir? I think it might just be time for the rating scauntlet. Let's give it get like. Do you think we should get a rating scauntlet sound effect? I would like it if there was more epic. I just like I think the word Gauntlet warrants so sure, let's let's enter the ratings gauntlet and you can put a sound effect there. We'll figure out what that is. Sure it's on the ratings. Start with rewatchability. For the first time in the rating scoutlet. I would see this film outside of the last forty minutes. Isn't that rewatchable? This is only my second time seeing it and I as I enjoyed it, but I don't see myself going back in the near future. I think it's relatively rewatchable, but it's not. You know, I could watch this a few times a month rewatchable. Personally, I think I could see it once every month if I needed to. But I think it's too long to...

...be rewatchable and I think and I feel like part of a key a key thing of ofver rewatchable is a you know, outside of the overall quality, is you know, each of the acts holding a similar amount of weight, and I think the first and second act here pale in comparison and thus disqualifying it from being a rewatchable fair enough, and would you recommend this? If someone asked me, should I watch that aparted, I would say yes, but thanks always. Well, but what I say that it's like a fun movie. Like if someone said, Hey, recommend ten films to watch, the departed would be nowhere near the top of that list. I don't know exactly who it's for. I don't think necessarily it's like our reviewer said, that it's only for straight men, because I just think it's like an adulty movie. Yeah, which I enjoy. I feel like I wish there were more movies like this. I got this reading eating all right, I don't want there to be any backlash, I but I wait, let me guess. Is this a six point five? I was going to say exactly a six point five. Wow, good for you. A seven is my baseline and even though this is a classic, I don't even it would be a modern class. I mean people talk about it like it's a mind. I think it's a modern classic and a lot of the angry one star reviews that I had to tread through said this is film is overrated, and I definitely don't think it's underrated, because there's a lot of height and I was some some level of disappointed. But six point five, I think, is right on the money. Martin Scorsese, your team, if you're hearing this, we'd love to talk you to you about any of your other films or this one. We're actually just desperate to get you on the show. Yeah, please, come on, we'd love to have you part. What do you think? I'M gonna go seven point five. I think I enjoy it more than you did, but I think that the end act is like a nine. I think that's really really good stuff, and I do I agree with you that the first two acts are, while good, not as good as the even the first half, I think. I think the second half is really good. Is it's that's like top tier filmmaking, and the first half is pretty good. I think it's a little unfocused and I think it's a little, a little too cleverly made for its own good. So let me let's talk about some death. Martin Sheen getting killed, awesome, Leo Getting Killed, awesome, Matt Damon getting killed also awesome, but I don't fully understand it. Kind of feels like Mark Wahlber comes out of nowhere and kills him. I know that he's like the only surviving character and that he was a cop and he left the force and he was on to him, so to speak, but he's just there when he's not a cop and more he's murders him. Yeah, but I would send then the movie and then the movie just sends. I would say that it's still relatively awesome. Oh, I'm not taking away it's a it's awesome honor. I'm just saying it. It is there for the shock value and it feels like it's there for the shock value. Fair enough, but I I think the last shot of a movie says everything about it, and the zooming in on the like capital, the golden pital building or whatever, and then with the rat, CG rat with I wish it was a real rat, and they like almost had me fooled there for a second. I mean it's not a particularly subtle symbol now or mascot. I like it, though. I think it's I think it's fun. This is that it. I think that's just about it. Do you want to tell the kids at home what comes next, Kiddo's if you don't stick around for next week's episode. Oh well, sorry, what are are Legal Peter? Oh my God, wait, Peter from legal is jeterming illegal is coming in whinning. What is Peter from legal? Have to say? Okay, so he's going to tell me not to mention the big weapon I have. That's going to happen? That's gonna Pause in that Ole damage and destruction. I do not rate our podcast and review our podcast really well on apple podcast and spotify. And he's saying, though, that it is okay. What? Oh, yeah, okay, he's saying that it is okay. Actually for me to tell you that next week we're going to be talking with bog laugh flour second Doug Leffler. What did you work on?...

He worked on army of darkness. What was he he was great, but he was also the second unit director on Sam Mariemi Spider Man, so it was freaking dope. And he's worked on a bunch of fucking movies that are super, super cool and he was a really cool man, yes, which is like the Cherry on top, because he could at once you work on Sammurymy spider man, you can just be a huge Dick for the rest of your life. But he chose not to know. So let's get back to the fact that you're going to give our show good review and then, and then we'll let you hit the road. Yeah, you'll see us every Sunday for the foreseeable future, the lowers day until parth or I die and or graduate from college. That's we're good to go, I think. So either you guys need to help us graduate sooner, kill US or prevent us from graduating or like, steal our laptops. We would really beat without a puddles. Yeah, so you have a lot of options if you're out there listening and you really want to put a stop to all this. But until then, he'll then quit talking about how you are going to do away with our show do something about it. This is a challenge by come stop us, by Belga, by WHO.

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