Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Craft Services
Craft Services

Episode 74 · 9 months ago

STAR WARS: REVENGE OF THE SITH (2005) Interview with 1st Assistant Camera Matt Toll

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent discuss Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith with its assistant camera, Matt Toll. They also discuss what's to come for the pod. 

Edited by Parth Marathe

Are you going to kill me? I would certainly like to. I know you I can. He gives you focus, makes stronger. True. Read Part Murat A. Call me crazy. Merry Christmas, Mary, Christmas. Yes, as of when this comes out, it'll be the day after, but also known as boxing day. True. Yeah, no, it's Christmas, guys, Santa, Santa Santy Claus Kane. Yeah, he came this morning. He left me and my loved ones gifts. Try once you get. I got this soprano sweatshirt that I'm wearing. Most importantly, due to an uptick in the covid cases we are, we didn't go to our extended families house and our parents were like, let's just schedule our booster appointments and then go. We see west side story and I was like fuck yes, and part I don't mean to keep him suspense, but you want me to read you my letter box review. Yeah, we held off on Trent doing this so that we could do it on air for for you guys, for genuine effect. Four and a half stars and the like called. Oh and it reads. It's almost like Steven Spielberg knows exactly what he's doing. It's funny because the the Steven Spielberg you speak of is one of the most prolific and highly acclaimed and commercially successful directors, but I've even though Steven Spielberg, early in his career, has made some of my favorite movies of all time. I've joked that past catch me, if you can, in two thousand and one, that Steven Spielberg hasn't made a great movie in a long time. And Tin Tintin and world, the world's is often your your immediate counter argument. But this, this was fucking awesome and one of our longtime fans, Nathan Snyder, he wrote a review and I really liked it. Can I, can? I? Can I read it aloud? Yes, please, on the air, Nathan, if you're listening to this. We like your letter box reviews. Thanks little. We also like you and thank you're awesome and thank you for supporting the show. Thanks to listen to the show. Long Long Time Fan. He wrote. It's been a long time since I'd seen something from Spielberg to remind me why he is indeed the king, and Uncle Steve's the king. That's all we're here to say, and tomorrow the Alger clan is taking on liquorice pizza and so PTA. Now having to see my cousins and just go into the movies all the time. It's the season of giving wait, liquorice pizza that gets me in a mind for food. Trent, what have you been what had you been eating? Would you eat? We have to get through this. Yeah, I forgot. That was like the whole show. We are a food show. After we got back from less cinema, I was hungry, so I made myself a smoothie and I whipped up a little egg breakfast, Sammich sort of situation. What about you? Well, as you saw, minutes before we got on call, I was eating a cinnamon bun that my brother had prepared. HMM, I was. I had had Christmas dinner at front of the show Sophia Alexis's house. Tune into the gone girl discussion if you want to hear Sofia Alexis's opinions. Yeah, and see her absolutely demolish that movie. Yeah, two it at ten. What's that all about? Yeah, go see the episode to find out, but I was hungry coming back. Trent, you want to know what movie we saw? What holiday classic we watched? Oh my gosh, no, I don't know, but you want to guess, you should. I'm not going to guess because they're is it? Is it one of the cornerstone Christmas movies? Sure, yeah, guess. Like, I don't know, the Jim Carrys, the grinch. It was spider man three, Trent oh on Christmas Day. How timely, I know, I know. Wait. So did you sit down and watch it, like and to...

...end? Yes, like why? Like, I mean, like you're not wrong, but why? Like on a day like this? Every now and then Sophie and I will scroll on Tick Tock and there's been a uptick in bully McGuire memes that have been going around with the release of the new spider man movie, bully McGuire being emo Peter Parker from spider man three. Yeah, so this is sort of a renaissance for for the finger gun toby mcguexactly exactly. And I was like so if you have you ever actually seen spider man three, like from beginning to end? And she was like no, like I know all the memes and everything, but like she'd never seen it fully, and so we watched it. Well, let's circle back to this, but I believe I was physically present. When Sophia likes this front of the show, admitted that she she casually just rang off the fact that she'd never seen the dark night and we were like so free, like oh my gosh, like you have to watch it, and she was like yeah, like maybe we'll get to it, and I was like, Sofia, like you don't know, like how much this means to part and then you played it off all cool and you're like yeah, I know, like it's a pretty good movie, like you should watch it, like if you have the time. But which you think of spider man three, we have like similar opinions, like I think that it. I mean we'll cut to the show soon, but I think spider man three is overheted. I think it's overcrowded. It has a lot of weird writing, but it's through that weird right. I mean Sammurami is like very present in every frame and I think it's weirder and more interesting and more entertaining to watch then most blockbuster movies that come out nowadays. And if you think Mary Jane is the problem in that movie, you're probably a misogynist. Yep, I feel like people have come full circle on spider man three, not to do a segue here, but in the same way that they've come full circle. On the Star Wars prequels, we're like that. Actually, yeah, the Vegas in like they're not good in the traditional fashion, but twenty years later you can really enjoy them in a slightly ironic way. Yeah, so maybe, maybe that's how we que in to our intro or q out of our intro. What Grand Finale Prequel winter? Yes, our last interview, isn't it? Star Wars episode three. Were mention of the sith. All right, Q, The intro wall. Welcome back. Welcome back to craft services, where we talk about the movies. Each week we talk about a film and hopefully have a crew member of that film to talk with us about their experience working on the picture. It's funny that we still say hopefully have a crew member of that film when it's like every week. We like absolutely do. I mean every other week. But also maybe it's just our way of like not jinxing this, or maybe it's like funny. I don't know. No, no, you're right. I guess they're in our in our in our prehistoric days. That wasn't a guarantee, but now we have sort of like industry crib. Yeah, we're kind of in fucking destructible. You know what I mean? Yeah, no, and speaking of the fact that parth and I are never going to die, neither will friend of the show Matt Toll, who is the assistant camera man on and star wars revenge of the Sith, this week's film, and we like did like a delightful little interview. Yeah, he was super, Super Awesome, really nice to us, you know, give us a bunch of cool little tidbits about the movie. Talked with us about George Lucas. It was is a fun time, true. He also talked of us about mission possible to sue. He worked on the Matrix, the Matrix reloaded the Thin Red Line Alien Covenant and I believe off the air, he told...

...us about deep Lucy. I think there was a fun and Itto. There was thus that you mere mortals at home will never be privy to. Probably had something to do with sharks, probably something to Samuel Jackson, but you guys just get all the you know, the what you can handle. Yeah, you can only get what we can keep on air. You know what I mean. You can't reveal all the secrets. After the interviews stop, like the minute we stopped recording. The guests are comfortable and then they'll they tell anything. She stuff. They're like, do you know Leonardo Dicaprio? I dated him. Yeah, it's pretty a set. True. I went on a date with Brad Pitt yesterday and you know what, that actually has happened and we won't tell you which guest it was. Yeah. Well, we don't want to take up too much your time. Since we're just about we're going to ask you to like be present for the next like forty to fifty minutes for the entirety of the interview, so we'll stop run in our mouths and we can get into the thick of things. No, yeah, I think it's time Qi the interview. Yeah, the little sound effect. Hello, everybody, and welcome to our interview with Matt Toll. He's worked on projects like the wilds, Mad Max, Fury Road, Superman returns and many more things you've definitely heard of. It was also the first assistant camera for our film for today, Star Wars revenge of the set. Thank you so much for being with us. Hey, guys, think so. Having me. Just to start off, if you could just tell us how you first got involved in the film industry. Yeah, what didn't I sort of got down the film school path. I all left school. I got into an economics degree, actually university, and I don't really know how I found myself there. And and then really through a friend of mine, a friend of my mother, who is, you know, working in the film industries as a booking agent in Melbourne in Australia. Yeah, you just heard about a job as a runner at a commercial production company. I'd never thought about being in the film industry or at that point, but you know, the job sounded interesting. I went for an interview and, yeah, and ended up spending about threes there is a runner on had to bake commercials and it's kind of how I got into it. And how did you gravitate or find yourself in the camera department? Well, those they also worked with. I worked a lot with some camera assistance and DP's there that worked on feature films and you know, we're going American feature films and you know, that sounded super exciting to me. I was always had naturally gravitated towards the camera department in my time there. I really liked I found it interesting and and you know, fortunately, like started working with these guys that I spoke to and told them I was interested in camera and they kind of took me under their wing and started training me up, you know, back in the days of bloating film, and worked on bigger and bigg commercials with them and then ended up leaving that company and then working freelance with you know, one of the guys in particular on on American feature film. The started on a on a mighty Morphin Power Rangers movie actually that came to Sydney back in the early s and then filmed like thin red line and mission impossible. And those films is a second AC's a kind of got got on a roll then when those films are coming to Australia. Can you quickly explain what a first assistant camera person does? Yeah, totally. Well, they, I mean a camera first assistant basically, you know, runs the day to day running of the camera department. You know there's a camera operators above them and obviously the DP, but you know, the first they see is responsible for the Organization of the equipment, the day to day running of the equipment, the running of the department, communication on set around all of that and and also, obviously the fundamentals of you know, the focus of the camera and and the changing of lenses and organizing equipment and all that. You were first assistant camera on Star Wars, so three runs of the seth how did you get involved with that...

...one? Because that seems like a pretty awesome job. Yeah, well, yeah, everyone must have been involved in the stubble film at some point, don't they? Like, it's pretty it's pretty cool and you know, we were lucky in that time. Like attack of the clones have been shot in Australia before that, a few years before that, and I wasn't involved in that, but I was working with a producer at the time, Steven Jones, who on a film, Peter Pan, that was been shot in Australia at the time and if a camera first on that film and and he's next project was revenge of the SIDS. So he spoke to me about that and Tommy that David Tattersall was coming out from the UK to shoot it and yeah, put me in touch with him and we started talking and you know, we got on well and I was off at the job and and went on from there. So I was just wondering like what scenes, if any of you particular you remember particularly working on, and also I was curious of which of the scenes were filmed in Australia. Yeah, it's funny. No, I actually watched the film yesterday because of this, you know, out to talk today and it had been so long since I've seen it. I'm in the film and into production sort of late two thousand and three, you know, which I guess is like eighteen years ago or something. So I hadn't seen for so long. It's nice to actually watch films when you've been removed for that long from them. But you know, for me at the time like it was, it was pretty technical really. I mean it was the first digital film that I'd ever worked on. The digital yeah, the digital technology was really coming through it that point and, you know, had had been embraced by a Star Wars and child. So you know, my head a lot of the time was in that world and I was looking at the film and I was thinking wow, like you know, probably seventy five percent of that movie is created in post production. You know, it's not like a normal film, you know, like a film back in those days where you'd go on like a can. You'd be down and you'd watch the film and you'd remember the locations. Like I look at that movie now and I'm like, I don't remember really being in any of those locations or those rooms or, you know, eighty ninety percent of that room with blue or green screen when we were shooting it. Yeah, and the characters, but but yeah, it was cool. I watch it again and, you know, you sit back and realize that's actually just a love story and it's like that. You know birth, if you want to Dart vader and you know, introduction to the WOKIES, and it was it was super cool. But yeah, little little moments down out, I guess you a dialog moment stand out really, like some really sort of know they seem almost plunky, but they're so cool, like some of the dialog you know, anything that movie like it's that's kind of the main thing that bounces back at me is like a memory from there and and obviously being in the room around those things when you were growing up, those first regional star wars movies that were so massive in the lives of, you know, people my age when the first lot of movies came out, and just being in the same room as a wookie or see three PR or Darth vader even, you know, like it was pretty cool. Yeah, I mean you you just mentioned the digital technology that was being used and, like us, attack of the clones of the first movie to be fully sharp with the Digital Camera. So I was wondering for you what specifically a about the shift from film to Digital? What? How did that affect your job specifically? Yeah, well, it was kind of the first time. I mean up until then, you know, I only work with film and so when you pull focus on film you can actually see. I mean there's like hd monitors on the cameras and on set, but you know, you really wear a lying on more old school, you know, things like running tape measures and, you know, putting Marxi on the ground law and on all the sort of stuff, and you really wouldn't see until you stall the projected daily. He's maybe one or two days later. You wouldn't actually see the work, the exact work you're done in terms of the focus and how everything looks. So I guess that was the biggest shift as a first a see was that suddenly you know the image is on set and you're looking at as first time ever I'd use a monitor to actually pull focus with, which is we are with the remote focus, and have a high Def monitor in front of you and actually been looking at you'd still have some marks on the ground and you'd still do a little bit of the traditional ways, but if you really work pulling focus from a monitor, which was completely different, you walk away the end of the day knowing exactly what's in focus...

...exactly wasn't. And you know that film actually wasn't particularly challenging from a focus point of view because those early digital cameras had smaller senses on them and there's a greater of field to focus on those cameras. So in that respect it was kind of more low key in the way it was just like dealing with the other parts of the technology, like, you know, suddenly you had to like deal with black bouncing the cameras in the morning, I mean, and you know there was a big apartment taking care of that, but still very technical, but on a different level to the normal, you know, ways of focus. Point that where we used to so, just out of curiosity, what was George Lucas like, if you interacted with him at all? Yeah, well, he was definitely very approachable. I mean, you know, as a first day see will myself. Anyway, I'll sort of you know, you don't often get involved in conversations with directors all that often or with actors. Are Sort of like trying to fly into the radar as much as possible. But yeah, George was very approachable. I mean he's a lovely man, like, he's a gentleman, he's a family man. He he definitely didn't want to work like long hours. He knew exactly what he wanted. He was very organized. He turned up, we show what we needed to shoot. He keeps it incredibly simple and faster and more intense. This as same as free as yeah, well, he just, yeah, he knew what he wanted. I mean this film was in production for probably nine weeks in terms of filming, and then it was probably another eighteen months of post production after that. So it's felt like call, you know, was basically the shoot was basically to shoot the characters that weren't CG and get the dialog and then and then it's almost like his work began then in terms of creating the world and after that. But not a great experience and I do remember, like particularly with a lot of the union stuff that's going on at the moment with workplace conditions, like we would never work past five o'clock on a Friday, no matter what time we started on a Friday, because George is very big on everyone going home and seeing their families and getting some rest over the weekend and then coming back on Monday. So it was a very enjoyable experience. Speaking of like the crew, what was it like working with David Tattersal, like the DP, and I guess, like a follow up question, when you're working with such CG heavy, like blue screen heavy, does that make it more difficult for you or is it just about keeping the the actors? Yeah, and yeah, yeah, yeah, David Tattersall first, he's a lovely man. I actually haven't had the opportunity to cross pass with him since but yeah, I just remember him being a very quiet, professional cinematographer who, you know, was very open to appeasing George in terms of shooting multi camera and you know, he just got it, doney, but he's Gaff rout from the UK, Eddie. It was amazing. And Yeah, it's very calm, professional and I actually was looking yesterday when I watch the film again and was thinking, like, you know, without early technology in those I guess I'd be considered lower end video cameras now like that. We shot I think it was a stony nine hundred, I think they were called. But you know, he made the film look great, I thought, with that technology and and the in terms of the CG. I mean again for me, like is the first day see like at least you know the characters that aren't there at the time. They're going to be in focused like every all that's going to look great like they had all that later, and it's just really about the eyelines. You're constantly creating eyelines for the actors to be able to deal with these other characters, and there's, you know, there's all sorts of tricks that you do to make that happen. But yeah, so probably, in terms of that world and having that amount of CG, probably the trick is for the actors, and I'd say more so than us. We're the majority of the scenes. Multicam setups. Yeah, pretty much short two cameras on everything. Yeah, yeah, and I remember George as well. We're often, like would be on zooms. Were on zooms for for everything and would often dislike position the camera and and even like not a lot of like camera moves into the closest setups.

Would often just do the wide and then to zoom in a little for the mids and then zooming for the closeups, like it was. Isn't multicam pretty rare for a movie that compared to like a TV set, where it's pretty common? Well, that often depends on the filmmakers. Like you know, some, some you had directors in DP's are right into it, like some DPS I work with as a first AC would love shooting two, three four cameras if they could. You know, some of them really enjoy the fact that the actors don't have to do it as often. Like you, you're capturing those moments maybe better than if an actor had to do it over and over again or an actor is dealing with another actor reading their dialog off screen, you know, like if everyone's got a camera on them and they have to be on and the performance is happening and you know whereas others, like, depending on the genre of the film maybe, or what they're trying to create, they did they really want to craft something with a single camera and feel like second camera may take their eye off the off the prize for that sort of work. So yeah, look, it's very different. But definitely with television, you know, becoming more prominent and people shooting multicam more often, it's definitely you have more normal now. I just came up the show called the wild and we basically shot three cameras on every setup, you know, where we're shooting five, six pages of dialog a day with, you know, large casts and and it's honestly the only way to get through to day. That's insane. Well, I mean speaking of and seeing shoots as my little segue into some other work you've done, but I'm a huge, huge Tom Cruise Fan and you worked on mission of fastball too, and I was just wondering have if you have anything about that movie and if you have anything about time cruise, that'd be like happy craft services gold for us. Yeah, yeah, well, that was fun. I mean that was, you know, Australian, that particularly then, like it's a little bit different now, but Australia was really, you know, luring in large action movies because I think at that time the dollar is down like it was good value for money for the Americans to come here and if you're spending a hundred million dollars already, then it turned into a hundred fifty million here or something like that. So it was fun. We went through a run of like the Matrix movies and mission possible and these other films that were, you know, large action movies, and I this. You know, Tom Cruise particular that time was the king of those movies, you know. And Yeah, he definitely bought a lot of energy to set. He you know, it's obviously you know, it's a big star power on set and it was exciting working around around him, you know, like yeah, but in terms of specific stories, think about that one a bit longer. Did you have any interaction with John will at all on that one? Yeah, yeah, John's interesting guy like he obviously, you know, face off in these other movies. are a huge action film. You didn't coming from the background in Hong Kong, but it just a very quiet gentleman that you know, I love to use huge explosions and and and and the largest, noisiest like blank rounds you possibly caught on set, you know. HMM, which is changing now as well. Like you don't often, you know, really often seen for years now like shooting actually blanks on set. It's just doesn't happen anymore. But that's why I remember about him. He very friendly guy, very quiet, who liked making loud, huge action movies. Have you ever worked on a film in the US? So if you worked exclusively in Australia and the motherland so far? Well, I've worked all over the world, but not so much in the US because I mean potentially, now that I'm shooting, I'm hopefully hoping to get some will work, you know, over the US at some point. But yeah, this were the unions as a technician, like as a first AC and the way the unions exist it's you can actually get...

...into into the states to work on on union film. So I've worked across, you know, through New Zealand then obviously across Australia and Europe and Asia and on the parts of the world, but not so much in the US. You've talked a little bit about the union and I was just wondering how you ended up getting into that and then sort of what it provides, I guess, just because we have no real idea of how any of this yeah, not totally, and I'm sort of the same to be honest, like we have a we have a union Australia, but it's nothing like the unions in Australia that the in the US that represent the cruising and I'm not actually part of the Union over there at the moment. Maybe in the future they'll come about, but more so on social media lately I've been seeing, you know, with union members over there. That was sort of from a comment before about that. But yeah, so in terms of, you know, getting your hours up and working in the Union and the Difference Between Union and Non Union members in the US, I'm not really across that either. Hopefully, further down the track album I'll be able to come a part of that. A film I wanted to ask about was the thin red line, yeah, which which rubbery Roger Ebert considers the best movie of the nine is and you worked on it, which is super cool. So if you remember anything about it, that is super regret. Yeah, well, I. Yeah, that was one of the first films I did as a second I see, which was a maze. I actually worked on the on the second unit mainly. I mean we went over as an additional cameraon worked with the Manian it some days and I think some six days on Saturdays. You know, we're with, you know, terrence malick and John Toll and, working with them shooting on the main unit. But Yeah, look again, that was amazing. I mean it was in an amazing location in northern Queensland in Australia. It had a huge list of massive actors that came out from the US to work on it and you know, it was amazing. Like you know, terrence malick has his own process which was interesting. Yeah, and we just blue stuff up and ran around and made a war movie. It was exciting. Yeah, I'm here. One of the main things I remanber from that film is that is that terrence never watched rushes during the whole film. I mean the probably shot millions of feet of film and I just remember that he wasn't Everett daily. He's in his process was to just watch the dailies. Wants to film it finished, which I thought was an interesting process from a director. Speaking of interesting directors, you worked on Mad Max very road. What was that like, because that's one of like the best movies of the past. Yeah, ever, the past ten years. Yeah, again, we'll hear by IMDB. Maybe a little misleading there because I actually I did work on the film for six weeks, but just on the on the pickups that they did back in Australia when they came back. Yeah, I was originally in the mix to go over to Africa do that, to do that film, but a few few things kind of change around. I end up staying in Australia and and working on the Wolverine Film that was shot in Australia at the same time. But Oh, what was that like? I love that movie. Yeah, it was great. I loved it. I mean you know Hugh Jackman, he's one of the nicest human beings on the planet. Taking took out all human beings, not just actors, but he it was great. I mean you know, it's his character. And Yeah, Woo Greene is is great and we shot in them. Yeah, we got to go to Tokyo. We shot at Toko for about five weeks and establish all the location scenes there and some other work there and then came back to Sydney for studio work in a small amount of location working in Sydney after that. But yeah, that was a super enjoyable shoot. So the Matrix and you are credited on and then you were, quote, additional crew on...

...the Matrix reloaded and we were wondering about your involvement in both and that distinction. Yeah again, yea, the first matrix film, I was second, I'd see, on on the second unit on that film, but to do a whole bunch of cool staff, and I was thinking about that the other day. Actually the in the first matrix when there were and the helicopter flies into the building that you know these days that would just be computer generator, but back then we shot that on a quarter scale in a on a property sort of a couple of hours out of Sydney and had a quarter scale building and courterscale helicopter full and explosives and you know shop that. I may not forget how many cameras were on that. Must have been close to ten cameras shooting that and it was cool. It was cool, it was it definitely felt like at the time that you were working on a special film that was ahead of its time in terms of visual effects and and you know, even today I feel I don't know what you guys seeking, but I feel like that film is really hasn't dated that much. Like it still stands up. I mean, you know, certain elements to it feel a bit data but but yeah, an amazing film and then you're on the on the other films. I was that credits is basically related to doing day playing on that movie. I think on some other work around at the time and I sort of came in and out, but I didn't have a full time position on the on the sequel's well, we talked a lot about a lot of your first AC work, sometimes second easy work, but you've also transitioned to being you're a cinematographer in your own rate and it was wondering if you could talk about how that, how that process has been for you and what it's like being the Headhun show on set. Yeah, about, yeah, camera, yeah, well, yeah, I was lucky. Look over all those you I work with some great cinematographers. I took a little bit from all those people and for a while there I kind of just really stuck a first day seeing on TV commercials. I had a young family and, you know, just started working on commercials and Australia and overseas is the first AC and work for a long time with a DP, Daddy Rawman, who's who's now, you know, shooting you as television all over the world, but they're there was a point where he decided to move to the US and you know, I've been doing most of my work with him and I kind of thought, well, now's the time. If I'm going to start shooting, now's the time. I've got good contacts in the commercial industry in Australia and and in the drama industry. So, yeah, it's a slow burn. You know, you start again, you've been so busy. First day seeing and everyone wants to support you. But you know, the first thing that happens is, you know, people say send this, you're real, you know, would love to give you some work and and I'm like, well, I don't have a real I've just been assisting form, you know, Fifteen, twenty years. And so you start again. You know, you shoot charity commercials, you shooting short film, shot load budget commercials, music videos, and start again. But you know, within a year or two they start developing, you know, relationships with directors and slowly but surely, be a commercial start happening and I'll be fortunate enough to shoot some great short films which have helped give me a leg up into the drama world as well. And then you start reigniting those contacts from earlier years and and you know, finally get some work on the board that puts you in the mix for smaller feature films and then, you know, leading on to now some we got American TV work which has been great over last fears. So we were wondering what the last film you worked on was or what you have coming out next. Yeah, I worked on I ended up I went up in shot second unit and then took over the main unit for the last little block on Tvach, so called non perfect strangers, which is just been released on Hula over in the US. And so that's just straight which was exciting. And then, off the back of that went up to Queensland, Australia and and shot two the blocks on season two of Amazons the wild, which just sort of finished production about a month ago. Yeah, I'm getting that comes out early next year...

...sometime. So yeah, that's the last two dramas and then, and now till the end of the year, just just planning on dropping back into teleision commercials and and seeing the year out and then seeing what happens next year. As far as drama, guyes awesome, Trent is it time. Oh it. Did you have a question? I had a little question before the question. Just in the way you've phrase that. Is there like like you made it seem like there's like drama season and there's like TV season? So is that how their our works? Like a few months out of the year there's like consistent work and the other time you go to like commercial stuff. No, sort of. I guess it's more so. I mean there's no real season in Australia in terms of that work. Like I'd sort of hear like they're maybe in South Africa and some places like that is bit more seasonal work. But now it's kind of more like, you know, the balance really coming off five months of pretty intense drama work and just trying to get the balance and just drop it into commercials for a while and, you know, reconnect with loved ones and friends and, you know, plan the next move rather than going from you go back to back on drama. I don't think you know, not that there was an opportunity for that this time, but I feel like it's just more about space in these things out and seeing what the next project is rather rather than being seasonal. Sure, yeah, are are they ready? For the BI Kahuna. Final question. Yeah, I was just about to say I think it's time. The last question we like to ask our guests is what is the last great film you watched? And it can be a new watch or it can be a re watch, and let's leave revenge the set out of it, just kind. And what's your favorite snack at the movie theater? Oh, wow, I haven't been theater for a while, but yeah, well, it's a second question first. I definitely like having a chop top at the movie theater. Little noise involved. Once that plastic RAPP is off, it's pretty quiet. Sure. Yeah, and actually watched also great film last night. If Beal Street could talk, sure. Yeah, so I love I love moonlight. Yeah, particularly the cinematography, like I just yeah, I just find the cinematography in both of those movies amazing. So, yeah, that's probably the last great film I watched. Cool partw on bring sound. Yeah, definitely that was a it's a great movie. Yeah, thank you so much to Matt Toll. He's worked on Sich movies as Mad Max Fury, road rune of the Sith that we've just talked about. Am I to the Tom Cruise fans out there. So thank you so much for coming on. It was a great conversation. Plad you guys thinks having me. Thank you, Trent Parth, met toll. We did that. We did it all right. I enjoyed it, I dude, I had a good time. What a what a way to end winter. About prequels. For the folks at home, this was. Was this our most difficult miniseries to schedule? Being that, I would say the only other thing that you could consider a miniseries was John Wick. Well, it was John Wick, and then we also did the horror stuff right, which would you say was harder to coordinate, or or this, because I feel like both had their challenges. I would say horror was a much broader category, especially since it's like two thirds of the movies that we did for harmonth were like debatably thrillers. But the Star Wars prequels, they are three of them. Yeah, and it wasn't particularly easy for us to find, guess, but like we they did it for you, but overcame the obstacles because we're trying to get a little uptick in numbers and bent and...

Jew Mark Sexton and Matt told they pulled through. Yes, because people of the universe like to talk about Star Wars and, more importantly, to listen to other people talk about Star Wars, and we're we're here for the people, for people, people, person's people. The interviews for Prequel winter are done and this discussions for prequel winter have all been recorded, have they not? See? That is an interesting observation you're making. And while, in a sense, prequel winter is nearing its end, at the same time it's only just beginning. Yeah, I am I wrong. No, I would say you're somewhere between a hundred percent on a hundred fifty percent correct. And the funny thing is what you guys have in store is the crossover event of the century. We can we reveal it? I feel like we should. It's right. It's next to except out out of the back and anyone who listens to the end of the interview deserves some fun bits. Yeah, they they should get the confidential behind the scenes info. So next week we are discussing revenge of the sith and we are doing a little crossover which we have been planning and it's actually happening. It happened. Yeah, yeah, it's done. Just needs to be edited. Trent Hey, hey settled down. It just needs to be edited. But we are talking with I the duck, Co hosts Adam voler rich and Dominic Nero and the funny and like. What I like about it is like our shows. Fine, it's pretty good. We have our moment. I think we're good. Yeah, but I, the duck, like, that's like pretty fucking beautiful. Like they're like, they're like they were my second most listen to podcast of the year, and I spend a lot of time listening to dumb AL movie podcasts. I'm just saying there are my number one. WHOA that out there? parth likes that more than I do. My number one was the ree watchables, a show that I also like, but I, the duck, hometown like to re listen to it. Check. Didn't work well. Anyway, let's move Oh, I see you did there, but no, it wasn't that funny. But we can. We can move on and continue to exercise the common ground between us is clearly your comedic sense is really okay. Yeah, no, the he no, that's great, that's great. Continue, but we happen to have a podcast together, and so we should just act excited about the big crossover event next week. Yeah, I mean it. That concludes prequel winter and then we're going to be going on a little bit of a hiatus. Yeah, we don't like the future of craft services, while we like know what is to come, like, in some sense, like we've got some stuff lined up, like we're not leaving you a completely hang like I would say we already have two like solid interviews recorded where we have we have one pretty fucking solid interview that it'll well, we'll get into that later. But yes, but the show lives on. One of US would have to die. Wait, but we learned at the beginning of the episode that US and get front of the show, Matt Toll, are never going to die exactly. So I guess the good news for you muggles at home is that on your deathbed even you can listen to US talk about Indiana Jones and the temple of dum or whatever, whatever my least Favorite Indiana Jones movie. Yep, yeah, I mean this is it's a little I'm getting a little sentimental. Trent. Well, we can be hard to see star wars go. We can say are like goodbyes. Well, we also we also have like like an end of the year special, like. Is that that's true? Maybe, maybe something will be coming out December, thirty thirty first, I don't know yet. Yeah, I don't think we should get to nostalgic because we have like at least two more episodes coming out before before the inevitable...

...break, since parth and I are tired from and also just it's like physically in we are physically incapable, due to work schedules, to record another release episodes during the month of January. Yes, I think scientifically it has been concluded that this hiatus is necessary for both I'd say earned. You know. Yeah, have we missed a single week this year? I think we may be missed lt like once we are in our groove, I think we may be missed one week, Judas in the Black Messiah. That was was the one time that we pushed an episode back and I was kind of surprised. But once we have like everything in place for prequel winter, we couldn't be lazy because then pickle winter would exceed the year. I think that's one nice thing about doing like miniseries type things is it forces us to have to have episodes out every week. Yeah, you know, I think everything that's been said has been everything's need to been said has been said. We agree. We spoken plenty of words for for one evening. Follow our social media, give us a good review on Apple podcasts and follow us on spotify. Yeah, thanks for tuning in to all of our interviews. Thanks to Mett toll for closing us out. Thank you to the loyal fans. If you're still listening to this point the interview, you clearly like Parthen I, and let me be the first to say we like you too. Yeah, well, it's it's good bye time. We started this and it was Christmas and we are finishing it and we it is no longer Christmas, it's the it's the next day. Now it's actually well, now we're speaking in the present. For you, guys, is because this episode comes out on the twenty six. Then it is nineteen am and Parthos the unique challenge of editing this whole episode tomorrow. It's going to be pretty fucking awesome. Yes, if you see part out on the street, give them a high five, because he deserves it, because boy was he in the fucking trenches with adobe premiere for like just for four and a half hours. Just sink and sink and audio files like you wouldn't believe. All right, Trent, enough of your bits. Your humor grows tiresome for me. Okay, okay, parth, you're the kid at the sleepover saying it's tomorrow now, but I'm tran. Wow, oh, those are pretty good in pretty impression of me. Bye, guys, bye, goodbye. Fuck team deacons like. Yes, but Roger, do you cans of you're listening to this? We really joy, we really care for you and your work. The helicopter shot at the beginning of Shawshank. Wow, good stuff. Okay, goodbye to Shanghai fight, skyfall. By Roger. Thanks for listening. Please come on, please come on, please. Okay, now, goodbye, bye.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (109)