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Episode 72 · 9 months ago

STAR WARS: ATTACK OF THE CLONES (2002) Interview with Storyboard Artist Mark Sexton

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent discuss Star Wars Episode II with its storyboard artist, Mark Sexton. They also discuss Back to the Future. 

Edited by Parth Marathe

I don't think the system works. How would you have it work? We need a system where the politician sit down and discuss the problem, agree what's the best interest of all the people and then do it. That's exactly what we do. The trouble is that people don't always agree. Well then they should be made too. By whom? Who's going to make them? I don't know. Someone you, of course not me. That someone, someone wise, sounds an awful lot like a dictatorship to me. Well, if it works. So, Trent, what have you been eating lately? High Parth, nice to see you. Good to see you too. You're looking well, not as well as you thanks what. I wasn't very notable. Would you have no, no, Trent, you have to tell me that's not allowed. Trent, I've made you eat food just before recording an episode because you hadn't even that the day of. So, because because this is part of the show, that it's it's in the name, head girl, part of the show. Our shows partially about food. Remember when I briefly took a stand and tried to make this section about the movie you watch most recently, and then the fans spoke and they said that's and I spoke for and I spoke, but you care more about the fans. That's fine. Yeah, well, majority ruled and and the and the people spoke and they said that the section was no boy now and they wanted the movie podcast. Is strictly be about movies, but the movie podcast fans want a movie podcast about food. Supposedly, I had a SMOOTHIE and a rice cake with some peanut butter on it. What about you? Let's talk, let's expand on on your half, you silly little minx. What did I have? I had chick bee Tika Massala with Rice. My roommate, chloe did last friend the show, front of the show. See the Staten Island, King Statin Island episode. Now both the people you live with have been on the show. You guys must have us true a bond now, yeah, it's really we weren't able to fully connect as friends until we were all on craft services. But now you look across the apartment and you're like, wow, that's a friend of the show right there. Not just a friend, a friend of the show. That's an equal, well almost equal. Well, they're not hosts of the show. No, no, though. Do I see you and look at you as an equal. That's a I say no, need no. Let's cut to the INTRO. Yep, welcome back to craft services, where we talk about Trent. Then what we talked about. This is our show. We have a podcast where we talked about the movies. Each week you talked about a film and hopefully have a crewmember of that film to talk with us about their experience working on the picture. This week we're talking about star wars attack of the clones, episode two. We're in the thicker prequel winter. Ladies and Gentlemen, we had store board artist Mark Sexton. To storeboard artists in a row. If you're keeping track at home, that's three star wars storyboard artists at this point. Yes, yes, but next week or two weeks from now, for our revenge of the sith discussion, will have someone who isn't store Bard artist. So it's true, the street will end. Yeah, but this week we had a really good interview. We've made we've alluded to the fact that's one of our best recent history. I would say it is our best and a few months and I love all of our interviews, but this one was particularly juicy. Yeah, it's like an animal farm. It's like all animals are created equal, but like different amounts of equal, and that's like, yeah, that's like our how our episodes on how much we like them. No, this was a great episode. We talked about how he was juggling George's am I race. We Got George Lucas on one hand, George Miller on the other, and in between like two to three hours of sleep and part I got like four hours of sleep last night and I felt like a terrible, terrible number of society. And so the fact that he was able to do that for months on end and, you know, make small talk with George Lucas, that like so like big movies. It's really like adible, like important movies, and I could barely go to class at nine am. Yeah, no, this is a great episode. A lot of fun stories. We got a Tom Cruise story, and what a Tom Crew Story we get? HMM, yes, it has to do with the fact that he's short, and so you'll want to his nose and his nose and it's sharp angle, I would say, or it's large volume and John Woo and maybe some discord between the two. I feel like mission possible to find its way into every interview now it does. Yeah, and it's such a fraught production that I'm amazed that it gets brought up so much. Also, but this guy has worked on some...

...other crazy stuff, like Black Panther. He told us about how his child is in the new thorror movie, or love and thunder. Potentially she's been shot. Yeah, that you or she's been filmed, sorry, parth, shot with a gun. Oh my God, we're you start. Okay, so he worked on Black Panther and man on the wasp. Oh, he told us about happy feet. That was pretty wild. I don't want to release all the goods just yet, but let's just say this is a pretty great episode that you should continue listening to and come to the end of the episode to, you know, let's do us talk. Yeah, there's a particularly fun anecdote towards the very end, and so listen to that. Maybe has to do with like a director that he has a chance encounter with and who is carrying around a big telephone, and that may sound unusual, but you need the context. Let's just say that when we offer you this episode to listen to, we're making you an offer you can't refuse. Yeah, and if you don't listen to the episode now. I'd say it'll be it. It'll be an apocalypse. Um Hmm, well done. You like that. I thought about that. I thought about that like two weeks ago. That was that's pretty going to love this. I do wordplay. Love it. But yeah, let's let's get into the interview. That's but yes, stick around in the end because we'll talk just between parth and I. Well, we'll shoot the shit after the shoot the shit. Q. The interview. Hello, everybody, and welcome to our interview with Mark Sexton. He's the story word artist behind such films as babe big in the city, mission impossible to Mad Max, Fury Road and our film for today, George Lucas's star wars episode two, attack of the clones. Thank you so much for being here today. Let's go right, I think. You for asking me. Promise not the Babel. It's all good. So just to start off, what would you say your relationship with film was at an early age? Well, my relationship with film after nearity. I just was I didn't have relationship with film at an early age because I grew up on a small island in the middle of the South Pacific, where we had no television and no cinema and by the time I was twenty I've literally be watched about maybe thirty films in my life, all on all on Beta, by the way, for you those who remember what Beatle worth beat was. So yeah, I had no relationship at all as a child. Were any of the first thirty movies you watched like really like cornerstone movies that like stuck with you, like you did. You Watch like titanic or something and you're like, shit, movies exist. Why? I'm a little bit older than that, so I started a little bit earlier than titanic, thankfully. The first film I actually got to see in the cinema I lasted five minutes. It was sinbad and the eye of the Tiger and I ran screaming from the cinema. Couldn't, couldn't cope with it. I think there was a skeleton priests. These priests burst into flames and then turns of skeletons with flaming red eyes and horns, and I just went back and ran. The first whole film that actually saw in the cinema was the plaster expect Whoa. It all comes full circle, a tie into today's episode and another episode, another episode two. And what did you make of it? Did you have the context of a new hope? Nope, I never seen it. So it was really confusing. I had the toys. I grew up in this island, you know, we had a toy store. We didn't have kill us in a cinema, but I'd read. I'd read the book because I knew that sty wars as a thing and I bought all these action figures and stuff of that, but I had no idea how it looked or anything like that. So, if I strikespect was both an exciting discovery and a complete mystery. So how do you how did you sort of like move into movies, because that's obviously your your whole thing. Now it seems to be alives be my think. I went into the well, let's put this way. Had to go to school in Adelaide after finishing school on this island because the art the island didn't have school past year ten. There's a couple more years in Australians such Australian school system. Had to go and do an Adelaide. Have an art teacher who didn't like me, who failed me. So I failed that and so when did a PhD in genetics at one is university in Melbourne, and at the same time I discovered that there were such things as Australian comic books and I thought...

I should go and have a shot at doing my own coin books, because I quite like the idea of comic books and discovered them when I was fifteen. Do that for a few years. Then I got banned. That's a long story. Let's just say that some of the subject matter in the comic book that got me band was potentially not considered to be kid friendly, even though the comic was not supposed to be kinfred kid friendly. But however, the authorities in Australia think the comics of kids and so therefore the media lair. So let's put it this way. It had the words take drugs kids. It did me no harm, delivered with a great deal of irony bucks anyway. You know, the powers that we don't understand Iro any so got banned. But the comic book got read by a Director in Sydney, Alex Proyas, who was he had done the crow and he was just storyboarding and doing preproduction on dark city and he just broken his previous story but ours and needed a new one, and he tended to use comic book artists for his story woods, because they don't know that, they don't know cinematic rules and because he sent her for some reason other. Like the comic that I got banned doing, I got run up and asked what I'd like to come up in the storyboard of film, which I said no, thanks very much and don't want to do that, and then they said I'll you know, look, I'll be paid you a thousand dollars a week, and I went on broken another the week. I could buy a lot of two minute noodles for that. Yeah, I'll come. So I wouldn't started doing that. And that was twenty fuck how long? Twenty five years ago, penty six years ago, and I haven't quite stopped since anyway, very long with did answer. I'm sorry. So were you turned off by the medium of movies, or were you just like that's not what I feel most comfortable and like from yet, from the start, because you've clearly come into your own. Not at all, not at all. I mean, movies are awesome as like much as anything else. It's all storytelling. You know, comic books of storytelling and I like doing comic books, movies, television. It's all storytelling, a mounship or form. I actually just enjoyed telling stories and storyboarding isn't a massive departure from comic bookwork, so it was a reasonably natural progression. Is just sort of didn't know any cinematic rules, so I just had to learn how to apply those in my storytelling, which took a while and a little bit of education, not from Alex Proyce, who didn't teach me dancing, even though it was fun working in his film. Didn't didn't learn anything except that I didn't know how to storyboard. So Anyway, Film. No, I thoroughly enjoyed film. I just didn't have a habit of watching them, I think because I've never grown up doing it. This conversation is not going the way you thought it would. No, no, this is all great. Is Our great. So, moving forwards just a little bit to the mean typic of the day. From not really knowing how to do storyboards, you landed the much covered a jab of storyboarding a star wars movie, specifically episode two, attack of the clones. How did that happen? Long Story I had, but I'll make it short. I had done a few films in the past with a particular production manager guy called Steven Jones and and I think I've done a film with him called Red Planet and even though, even though Redclin it wasn't a great film, I tried to storyboard the hill out of it as much as I possibly could and he must have remembered me. So he then was production manager on episode two when it was shooting in Sydney and Nick Gillard, who was a fight coordinator, wanted to storyboard out a proposed fight sequence and I think he just put the call into the production office, is there any story but artists in Australia that I can use to do this really quickly? And Steven Jones went well, actually, there's this idiot, you could probably use him. So I got a call and asked whether I'd come and storyboards some star wars stuff for Nick Gillard, and I was in the middle of Mad Max fury road the time, so I was a year into that. So that was in production at Lake Two thousand and one. Oh No, no, we started storyboarding in Fury Road and one thousand nine hundred and ninety nine all so and finished in two thousand and one and then it took another of twelve years to actually go into production. Long...

Story, very long story, but so I was doing that. Got Asked us in the star wars stuff and of course I'm not going to turn on a star wars film. You know, I've grown up loving the concert of Star Wars. Well, still not really knowing that much about it, having not seen the films more than a couple of times. I love the I love their mythology. So yeah, meet George Lucas, do some stuff. We're in the Star Wars universe. Awesome, I'll just do that my spare time when I'm not doing that Max storyboard. So I literally came in, had a meeting with this, with Nick Gillard, who was this loudly of the English guy, and gave me a shot, this brief me on this brief me on this fight, and I went away in the story boarded it and that US what I think. I thought there would be the end of it. was just a pitch to Lucas and then two days later I got a call saying George Lucas would like to come in in storyboard the next bit for him and there was like okay, I'm in the middle of story boarding. May Max Herey road. How the hell am I going to do this? So I literally had to ask George Miller, do you mind if I do fury road during the day and Star Wars at Nice on weekends? I'm probably won't get much sleep for a few months, but is that okay? And George Millerity. Yes, I just I just like to learn how jeuge Lucas makes his films. You were Juggling George's I was definitely, I was in, I was, I was, I was surrounded by George. Next, you don't worry, there roads not coming out for another fifty years. We got time. Yeah, anyway. So yeah, essentially that's how I got the Gigan came in and met met George Lucas and started doing storyboards. And what was really bizarre was I don't think this. They don't. They're in preproduction, moved to Sydney. Everyone was there. Sets of being built and some of that I don't think they've done any storyboarding. I don't think they have any. Didn't see any storyboards in evidence at all until after I started. So there were a lot of them. I think they were trying to do a lot of the the kind of video, video style previous before movers, was really a thing, you know, chopping up, did some films doing you know, lower low rent camera set up some sort of it and trying to take some sort of idea of how the scenes would go by using models and put him in front of cameras and doing shots of them and Stut of that cutting all together, because that's what Ben Burt seemed to be doing. He was editing the film and he had all these sequences he'd been piecing together. But I don't think there was any storyboards, which is which I was completely surprised by. Must have been a did not expect that. So, with that being said, them starting storyboards relatively late in the process, where they're like teams of people. And how did they divide the sequences? And if you remember, do you remember any sequences you worked on? Well, I know which sequences I worked on. In terms of how it worked, I was the only story but passed in Australia Doing Star Wars. There was no other story but others there and I was working directly with Lucas back at the ranch. was, you know, the concert part department, and they started doing storyboards after I started doing storyboards, but they were restoryboarding the bits I'd been doing. I'm not quite sure whether it was because Lucas asked them to or because they thought I'll shit someone story but it we're bit to do it a better job, which wouldn't have been hard, but anyway. So they were doing it and I think there was a guy called Warren Drummond who was bought in for a brief period and he did a little bit of storyboarding and then I think he had to leave. But I saw storyboards by I think Ian mcag and a couple of other people. And then way down the track, when the way went to post and I think they'll putting stuff together. I think they had another gentleman who I cannot remember the name of. I Apologize The human advance. He ended up being very big at Marvel, doing a lot of stuff for them and he came into a bunch of stuff during post. But other than that it was literally kind of happens. Half the stuff was a bit like let's just make up as we go along the sequences. I tended to work on the things like I did the OBIWAN canoby Django fit fight on landing platform. That was the first thing. I didn't. That was the bit I did for Nick Nick Gillard and then ended up reworking it later down the track. Then I worked on quite a bit of the stuff in the arena at the end of the film, particularly...

...again, since we all Django fet centric. I did the whole stuff of Django fit fighting with Mace Windu. Did a bit chunk of that, including all the stuff with the reek things like that. A whole bunch of second unit style stuff of various stunts that could involve, you know, Jedi doing combat stuff in the background. But Nick Gaillard and Ben Bert, we're going to shoot. But probably the bit that I really worked the most on was the asteroid chase. So the JENGA fit being chased by over and CANOB during s through the asteroid, including including that lovely that lovely sonic mine bit, which is just going to say, which I will partly take credit for. I didn't, I one take credit for the sound. That was all been. It was one of my ideas which ended up ended up actually being really nice. Quite like. That's my favorite bit of the film, Not because I did it, was just really effective, one of those good moments. So but yeah, that was. That was pretty much it. Yeah, I mean this is during shoot and I was literally meeting Lucas on Saturday mornings having worked all worked all through the night, from Sunday through to Friday, working all night Friday, and then seeing Lucas having had no sleep, handing over the storyboards and then trying to listen to him while it's like to stay awake while he briefed to meet brief me on the next bit. And then during the week, during the week those going to Kendy Miller Mitchell where we were doing fury road and drawing story boards to George and it was an interesting time because I was averaging probably about two to three hours of sleep and night and my debt for about four months was entertaining. It's good, which I mean speaking of Lucas, like what was I mean? George Lucas is such a metological beast to us. Yeah, it's like, what was what was he like in the flash? Well, as you'll already know, who never, never seems to change his clothes. He's always got the same wardrobe. That's fairly, fairly, fairly known, and that's definitely true. I could be prolitically correct and say was fantastic about. Love working with them and it was great. What I will say is I found him very remote. I actually really a really I mean I was really excited to meet him, but he was so he's such a reserved character. He's very doesn't give very much away and as such, he's not. He doesn't. I mean, obviously if you knew him well, he'd probably much more outcoming, outgoing, but to me, Steven Spiel big, yeah, yeah, exactly. Yeah, but to me he was kind of like, okay, to me we're going to do a space chase. That was about it. You know, he wouldn't give very much away and then, you know, you just read trying it get details out of him, and a couple of times I'd ask him questions and he'd kind of look look at me a bit surprised when, you know, I'd say, I don't agree with it, I don't think is that a great idea, and he just look at me and it was just like it was like it didn't compute. It's me, and then he just keep on talking like someone. Someone just said no and I don't know what that means as saige seven or seven yes, something like that, but you know, it was. It was interesting because he was so so remote and and and seemingly so unemotional, and I was. I hadn't been storyboarding, I hadn't been films for more than four years and I had still heaps to learn at the time, and so I said it just got Wi thank it. Will be impressed with this like that he's done what's going on like this very much. But what I learned, and certainly with Rick in retrospect of slantly, learned that when I used to ask him questions like why do you want to do that, because I thought it was a ridiculous thing in film in the filming sense, and he would also always answer the question in terms of backstories of these characters. He'd never say, all, I want to do it because, you know, I really like this and I really like this sort of sharpens of that. He wasn't while in a roll, you know, like I asked them a question. You know, why do it? Why do battle Joids have detachable weapons? Isn't that ridiculous? You build weapon, you build drop battle droids. Shouldn't they have built into weapons so you can't disarmorate? and He'd been just going well, you know, and I asked that because I thought was a bad design choice, and he went while, you know, the Free Trade Federation were real cheap and they had all these drives that are on the assembly lines. So instead of building a...

...real robots, what they did was they actually recondition the robots they had reprogrammed to be weapons, to be weapons, and then gave them guns, you know, and that's what they did and then they got better leader on. But that's what happened with those first battle droids, and he said to just get different. That's my question. That's a ridiculous but in retrospect, well, I've realized is that it's all about backstory and it's all about stories telling. And in fact he was completely bloody right, and I was just bloody naive, you know, idiot story, but artust, you had no bloody clue while I was actually asking, and I was I was being far too judgmental and I should have given a hell of a lot more credit than I've bought me, and I did at the time, because he was he was very smartly sticking to story reasons why everything was happening, as opposed to technically, you know, there should be this. It's like not stories in story wise, it's this and it shows, because then you want something like stars sequels, you know, the UN Disney ones, where it becomes more about the technical side of things as opposed to the backstory side of things, and then you get that weird non mythological feelings those films. They don't feel big, they feel strangely small and strangely, yeah, strangely ephemeral, whereas the even even the prequels have grown in terms of their appreciation over the years, because there is this deep level of story to everything which makes it exist, you know. And then it's a testament to it that, you know, all these like the clone wars, all these animated series and so many things have come out with the wild building that happens. It was all of those Gils. Now it's because star wars people are crazy people and they love Lore, and that's why I like every background character has their own like spinoff comic book, Fan Fiction. Will Kipedia page. Yeah, exactly. If you've got the stories, you muscle use them on. The fact is, Lucas has already got the stories in his head. Yeah, it's like he's making a documentaryting and that he's making a documentary about a universe that he made up, which is why he feels so loyal to like all the details. He's like, well, we can't change it. Yeah, and I know. Yeah, so in the storyboards, I guess by and large, and on this are you just doing like key frames or it's like every or isn't more of like a shot list, whether like we're going to do, hell know, the shot talk on that Ed just key friends. Now you go straight through. I storyboarding for George Miller. George Miller does everything and you step through a new d multiple frames very shot. You do the beginning, the end of the see of shot. You know the injury point, the exit point, what's happens in between? You try and map it all out so that everything flows, and that was certainly what I did with Lucas to because you know, particularly with things like the the asteroid chase, that went to a previous team. You know, again early days and previous, but you know there was opposite. Danderin's and his team were doing previous and breathes. Is really bloody difficult to do unless you're really really got a seriously good cinematic head. It's really had to do without storyboards, and so storyboarding those sequences properly and showing how it flowed makes their jobs so much easier. And what was fascinating, I mean again my first experience with that proper preevors was actually seeing what, three weeks after I finished the the asteroid chase sorry boards, is that they delivered the first cut of the pretors for that sequence and it was almost with exception of cutting out one idea that was not a very good idea. I think was I think was one of been Bert's ideas, smoke screen space, which doesn't make much sense. But other than that they were faithfully executed every single shot and the only thing they got wrong was I'd slightly got the lensing wrong on one frame, which was a shot of a of the droid missile chasing over one CANOM. He's starfighter and and I draw it so the droid in style was really close to camera and you know, the spaceship was the staff flight was really small in the background and you're traveling with destroyed missile and they missed read it and thought up Jesus, that's a giant missile chasing a tiny spaceship. So they had this one shot of this enormous missile chasing a spaceship was about a tenth of the size. So on that though, it ex secuted it seamlessly and it flowed beautifully, and a large part of that is because, you know, the storyboards stepped out how it was going to work and then they just took it and round with it. But they had the beginning at endpoints and the knew how it was supposed to flow. So it totally makes sense that you do it that way. When...

...it came to other sequences, yeah, it was always it was it was going to be chopped up and put into as work as always does, you know, into cutting various various bits of action. That was always going to be done that way, but you tried to actually make it a seamless series of storyboards to tell the story, in as much as a is a in a smooth way as possible. Yes, it you've worked with previous I guess, close to its inception kind of, or when it was really starting to get started, and obviously you've had a long career in films since then. So then, like, has there been, on your end, a change in your process in working with the medium at all, or is it just kind of simply it's it's storytelling. It's what it is good pretty much, though. I mean look, I mean other than the fact that, you know, when I was doing star wars, I was working on paper and you know, squeaking mark has and and pain and ink, and these days now it's all done computer, but I'm doing almost exact the same thing. I'm still drawing the same way as a use. It's just that there's no paper and the rays of functions better as to the actual way I storyboard. Sometimes you get a little bit more interative with your with the use of frames, because what you're trying to do now is you're trying to make it so if it goes into an animatic group, goes into into previous you're trying to make it so that it visually flows to the when you cut from one frame to the next, there's still that flow of image, so it's not doesn't jerk around and confuses everyone. And of course you don't use arrows anymore because everything is going to get moved. So you very rarely use use direction arrows and camera camera arrows and some of that anymore. So you just doing the frames and then doing interative framing in order to show what the moves going to be, which involves a little bit more work. So there is more work involved, but that way you know it's it's not fundamentally different. I must have been I'm not very good at picking up on new technologies, like, you know, integrating three new models into the work and stuff like that. I haven't done it. I just still do it all out of my head because seem to have this ability with it's a blessing, a curse or something something else, but I see that this ability to be able to think, think threedimentially, so I can plus out how something works in my head pretty pretty instinctably and I can generally draw things from multiple angles without too many albums, so I'm able to actually figure out how that moves going to look from various angles, where there may be other people out there who struggle a little bit with that. So I've never really had the feelings that I need to learn those technologies, which probably means I'll probably make myself redundant very shortly and I'll probably never be a pet work in this industry again. Anyway. They're sucks to be me. If that's the case, it sucks to be you. So you also you work. You have it seems like you have a longstanding relationship with George Miller and I was wondering, like how you met him, and particularly about your work on Mad Max Fury Road, because he did it simultaneously with Star Wars, which is fucking crazy. You know, yes, in yes, there's a there's a story behind there's a story for that as well. Let's just say, George Miller, I've done my first film back city and that would work. Gone reasonably well. George Miller was SI's were wrapped up early, early, early preproduction on by to pick in the city and George always tries to storyboard as much as he possibly could, and so he was looking for story but artists, and at that stage there wasn't that many story but artists in Australia who were actually actively working on live action. Think of about four or five people and most of them were busy doing other things. A lot of them tended to buy rock to the states because there wasn't that much high budget film work in Australia being done at the time. Not many runaway productions from the states coming over to Australia as a result of which there was not many story but ust around. So me being invented as a story but artist in one thousand nine hundred and ninety six meant that, I said, it became useful to many people rather rapidly, which is very lucky. You were a one of commodity here, one of five. Yeah, well, they'reabouts. So we had a team of George. George had a team with fo story but artists. For the first bloody hell, first seven eight months we worked on babe to they wanted someone else to do it. Was a lovely lady who I who was working on dark city called Jennifer Yuh, who was who's gone on to have a stellar careered and directing...

...things like come through, panda two and three and stuff like that. Oh, my uncle, she had a store, she had a storyboarding background but she was doing concert that on dark city and but she'd come from Los Angeles and they walk and I think they were very people Austoria are very keen to keep her in Australia and try and keep keep it busy, and so she was asked to come over and meet with George to see if she'd kind of like to do babe too. And she asked me to go along because she was a bit nervous and she said can you come and just be in the meeting, which is a bit weird, but any way, there go. So I turned up and they met her and that coming down and talk to her in the foyer and I was there to sitting another chair in the background, and they talked to her for a bit and she went no, sorry, I really have to go home. I got to go look after my have to go look up my mother and some of that. But that guy over there, he's storyboards, your story boarding that city, and they oh him, oh you want to come out? Can we look at this stuff? So they eventually decided that they didn't need Jennifer. They abuse me instead, which was interesting, but anyway, and that's how I essentially met George, and then I obviously did well enough that George then continued to use me. So, you know, went often did some other stuff after babe too, and then got last come got asked to come back and do happy feet. But why, while I thought I was coming to do happy fe it was another talking bloody pigm and talking animal movie which it just going got up. I going to be talking animal guy slightly got into a meeting with George where he went up, so you're coming to work on Mad Max, and to this day I'm never not quite sure whether I was actually legitimately called in to come and work on Mad Max or that was happy feet to happy feet and and George just made a mistake. I'm not quite sure how it would be. Anyway, ended up doing fury rodents did. Sorry, I'm babbling this Um buggering the story up. I keep on saying the wrong films. You know this is our great please keep knowing, but I'm eventually I'll make sense anyway. So yeah, and I've been more or less working with George ever since, even on things like Justice League mortal, which never, never went never never actually happened, thankfully, because I think it would have been bloody awful. But you know, that was there was a film that shouldn't have happened because they were nowhere near really ready to go into production. Because I'm trying to outrun the riders strike. Didn't have a finished script, they didn't have a properly fleshed out concept and they we're going to spend a normous amount of money trying to fix it in post as it were some kind of glad climbate. Glad it didn't happen. So you worked on Fury Road in Ninety eight or ninety nine? None, ninety nine to two thousand and one, and then in two thousand and nine as well when I went to put into pre production for the second time. And then, yeah, wasn't. Wasn't on shoot, and then I rightly wasn't on the shoot. When actually did it? Were you seeing shots that you were like, Oh, this is my work, when you saw the final are finished round? George freely, freely says fury road is eighty percent storyboards. Right, yeah, remember, you know a lot of quite a lot of storyboard artists because because there's a certain lack of appreciation for what they actually do in in filming, certain in terms of crn and some of that. A lot of story with US tend to really hang on to shit. That's my shot, whereas I'm much more of the opinion of the storyboards are a tool off which everything else hangs, you know, even to a certain degree script, because you see, really had doubt the script massively, particularly with something like fury road where it was such a visual film as opposed to a story with a complex plot, I should say a film of the complex plot. The storyboards were really the skeleton on which everything else was built, and so what was nice and not just seeing recognizing it a shot, go, it's my shot, but actually go fuck that sequence. That sequence is kind of close to what we storyboarded and really bloody works, and that's that's what's exting. That's what's exciting to me, is seeing seeing proof that, you know, how you think about the story telling actually co comes together and actually cinematically works, and fury road...

...certainly was an example of that. You know, I mean I've worked on a few films of my life and this is this that'd be the one I'd be proudest of, as you should, because fury road is like pretty fucking amaze balls. I think just the clinical time to go away, to put it and okay, so while we're on the fury road talk and the George Miller talk, I know we can't talk it all or anything much, but it is on your IMDB page and currently Furiosa is in pre production. How is that? It's going well, a storyboarding as we speak. That was they were also upside down and very blurred. So you want it to when we do actually take yas this as as an audio medium. So just for the listeners at home, he flashed us like a quick glimpse something that might have been furious the story, which it might not have been. Yes, anyway, now it's going. It's going well, I mean way cracking on. I think there's I think it's another six months or so before it starts shooting and there's a chump of worked on. George's currently finishing work on his little his little side predict three thou years of longing which he shot last last year and the beginning of this year, and that's going on pretty well. And then then he's onto furious a properly. But it's it's going to be pretty ambitious projects. I mean scope. The scope is massive. I mean fury roads, Tu roads, a chase, and it's amazing, amazing chase and very super involved and super complex in the same time. Super Simple, curious. There is a very different beast. George. Never, never, George never does the same film twice. That's put it that way, and it never works the same way twice. So it's a it's always different every time. So this might be a difficult metric, but like, how many strawboards would you say you take up typically complete in like one day? Oh God, that is the ten thousand million dollar question. I'm sure that's where every producer is asking themselves. Like how many can we force out of the sky? No story that the producers are saying. How many story woods is he going to do, as opposed to how much? How many storyboards do I need him to do? Right, he's going to do that in any as opposed to you. How many can you do? And are sorry? Another side question. Are they all in black and are they all in color, or is black and way a thing? No, generally they're in black and white because if you do color then you just slow yourself down massively. Yeah, colors. When you've got a little bit of time they start doing it. So generally they're in black and white, but they are generally fully rendered, you know, ink toned, you know all that sort of stuff, as long as it clean and clear and you can see what they are. A storyboards an effective tool. You don't want them to be. What's the word I'm looking for here? This is where I'm going to fall flattened my face and can't think of a word which happens with the regularity. I think it's smill as he coming on. If they're ambiguous in any way, then the storyboards don't do their job. You need them to be unambiguous. So it's whatever you can do to make that the case. And come come from the Comic Boo backgrounds why I try and draw things very reasonably tightly but immediately recognizable, very clear what they are. As to the question of how many storyboards I do a day, it can vary anything between five and eighty. WHOA five? Five is a really, really, really, really really Oh God, you've asked me to do shots with three hundred thousand penguins and a thanks, George. All right, can do five of those a day and spent six months drawing storyboards of, you know, three hundred thousand God damn penguins in the background of shots. But the most I've ever done, I think most of ever done, was I can neither say per day. I've done ninety two friends in a day and they were penciled and it pinpend and ink and that was on Red Planet and I'll never do that again because that nearly killed me. Generally, the accepted wisdom, as you do, somewhere between twenty to twenty five. As I get older, I slow down a bit. So I'm not quite doing that at the present moment, but I'm trying very hard to get that amount done. But what you're also trying to do, and this is the thing about storyboards, is they're Atative, you know. So it's all very well to draw a whole bunch of story...

...aboards, but if they're not useful, then you end up going to going away and joining them again because you didn't think about a proper you just trying to get a certain number of frames done a day doesn't mean that that's effective and efficient if you take the time to think about it and really get into the mindset of what the director actually wants. If the director has told you what they want, which is another story and another another subject for another time, then if you can think about that and make it truly useful to them, then that's a whole bunch more effective. So I tend not to with George milliferences. I'll tend to storyboard everything twice. But what I do is I'll do incredibly rafts, incredible incredibly bad drafts, which he can recognize and then he'll tell me none, I want to do this, this and this isn't this, and then I go away and a story board, a proper I finished, clean it all up, now give it back to him and he generally tends to make absolute no changes after that, and that's seems to be a much more efficient way of doing things. A lot of films now story but asked. Don't actually have conversations with the director about what they want. I mean, I've done a I've done about for marvel projects now and and a lot of those cases the storyboarding is done concurrently with everything else in preproduction and they're writing and they're doing a whole bunch of other stuff as well and the directors being pulled in a thousand different directions at once and he doesn't have time or she doesn't have time to sit down with you and work with you iteratavely on all the sort of stuff. So you tend to get given chunks, you go away and you execute it and then hope like hell's they like it. Most of the Times that works, sometimes it doesn't. Famously, I worked on a sequence three months of Black Panther and then I then Captain America civil war came out, which introduced the character and I watched it when ran up the producer, or cinnamon email, and said are Ye, I've can't sequence what I was just about, the handoff for our Black Panther, and I've just watched civil war and I've just discovered the Black Panther is bulletproof and it's a sequence all about him trying to avoid being shot by people, because I thought he wasn't bulletproof. So I have to throw the whole signs out in the start again. That means most people aren't. Most of are in bulletproof. As a fair assumption jually tends to be. I mean, yeah, that's a that's a that's a fairly extreme, extreme example of a lack of community communication. But you know, it's also understandable. I mean to a certainly great they're juggling so much, so much, and there are certain things that they take for granted because they know these characters so well, but they don't think that you might not know it right. So and you know, again the things like the marble films. I'm over in Australia and they're over in the La and so our back and forth is limited by, you know, Time and climate distance. So I am a huge, huge there's a big pivot, but I'm a huge time cruizing and you worked on mission possible to I don't know how long you worked on it, for or six months, to meet the guy, but I did. WHOA. So I yeah, in fact, I got I got you. I can see there right now. I got his nose right there on my chest under whether compleatent clamable light, because he's incredibly short and he lands lead and he came charging around a corner because he, I think you had his people with him and he was going from set to set and I'm he was in full producer mode and he came charging at this corner. I was walking at the way and it just walks straight into me and his nose hit me right there and and you still had the indent. Yeah, to this day. I'm boy, okay, that knows anyway. But I've had a couple of a couple of meetings. Meeting is where he he was part of it, and he said, you know, I mean he's a very focused individual, but he generally seemed to have a very he seemed to have a very good idea of what he had a very clear idea of what he wanted. had a very good cinematic head, so he was very clear about what he wanted from a cinematic perspective. But you know, he tended he knew everyone, even even if you didn't know you personally, he knew what you did and he had a very good understanding of whatever I didn't. I think he appreciated that and he put in the time. You know, he he worked bloody hard and I'm you know, for all the other Hollywood and soundnything so that I'll give him absolute credit for the fact that he really wanted the best for the...

...films he was he was doing, you know, particularly on the mission possible films, which obviously he used. The producer clearly wants the best for the film. But you know, he he worked bloody hard to do it. So you did you tackle out with John Woo, with have lunch with John where every day the story. But Alas, there was two of us on on the shoot, a guy called Robbie conzing and and I am with John. John didn't like the catering on the film. So every lunch time he would it, he would get food ordered in from this really loving Chinese restaurant in the rocks in the Sydney cbd called the Imperial Peeking, which I believe cousin of his work catch with the managers like that. So we get these bloody Chinese banquets brought into the studio every single guy. Then Day and because the story, but others to work for him, we'd get asked to come and then he'd sit there and he'd sit on one. So that day from media's noodles and all that sort of stuff and all this bloody fantastic woodn't just good. Look at your too, getting fat and lazy, eat, eat, and and it was. He was fun. He didn't give he didn't give much away, but he liked this food, like Tom Cruise. Whoa they? They seem they seemed. They seem to. He wanted to do his film and he didn't want Tom cruize telling him what he wanted, and so I think they tried to try to. He tried to avoid Tom Cruise that ever possible. So very rarely. When I said, when I was with, when I was around John, I'd very really see Tom and John used to hide from Tom between takes because he didn't want to happen. You didn't want to have to talk to him. So we'd go and find some flat somewhere and it'd sit on a chair because you always us with his very recognizable shoes. So it's in on the chair on a cheer would its feet up. It was Tom Cruiz to go around looking under everything to try and see if you can see John Shoes so he could find him and talk to him. So so it was rather entertaining. That was a very dysfunctional film and it shows a little bit. But it wasn't the best. Wasn't the best mission of possible by a long way. They found anyway, there you go. Yeah, anyway. So you mentioned earlier that you have a child who is in the upcoming for movie and also you worked on the upcoming thorn movie. So I ve done that. HMM, for love and thunder. Yes, for love and thunder. Just spent eighteen months working on it. It kept me. He Kit me in point through, keep me employed through COVID WHOA I was. I was very lucky. They when they shut down production, they kept me on and so I don't think there was another story. Would ask kept on? I'm not sure, and it's you just don't know. You just find out whether what other people were on the film later down the track when you see the film in the cinemas. But as far as I know I was the only story. But that lust one after they shut down and I was kept on almost the whole way through shoot and that was a lot. That was a lot of fun, I've got to say. It was a it's insane really, it quite insane and I've never done it before, but I asked, ask the producer, whether there was any opening at all all for a for because I knew there were some roles for a couple of kids, background roles, you know, extra's roles, but you know, involved in involved in some action scenes as of for that, and I asked, as the producer, whether there was any opening for any need for kids and whether my child could be put into the mix. And to their absolute bloody credit, you know, they remembered it. Four months later when those sequences came up, I got asked whether my child was available to come in for these things. So she got to rank right hang around with Hemsey and wow, hems, hems, you her mate and and and much. There's a whole bunch of other kids as well, and they all got ring around with Himsey and do action sequences and have a great fun. You're on a HEM Z name basis, on Hemsy, Hemsy, me, mate. Yeah, so, and God he is a big, big, big man. His his upper arms are bigger than my thighs. It's terrifying. And and when he puts a thawsuit on, Jesus Christi Store. So. Yeah, and of course now I'm on Bloody Furiosa and he's in that as well. So I'm just following Hims around. Or No, no, actually, no, not, he's following me around. So there you go. Did you get the cow? Let's take all to elate, because he...

...really cool. Little do ty maker is quite tall. He's certainly not little. is you called Big Dude? He's at all dude. He is cool, he's mercurial. He's definitely one of those guy who guys, who's super smart and gets something about five minutes before everybody else. And so, you know, you're like, I would have to do video, video pictures, where they would all be over in the states, you know, all the department heads for that, or scattered around the world, all on video feed, and have to show them my storyboards and run through the sequence and what I thought it should be and the certain other and tyker would always be on his phone in every single every single one. And I've got a complex of bit up thinking he hates everything I'm doing. He just he's not looking at what I'm doing. He's just on his phone and and I'm se there just getting shit and so I certainly producer. I'm an email just at I'm really worried. I think tyker hates me, hates my staff. He's just he's just not saying it anyone. Oh, what do you what way you're saying that? I said, well, he's on. He's always on. He's always on his phone. I don't know what he's doing, twitter or he's googling stuff or whatever. He went, fuck, no, he's sitting there texting me about the stuff you've done as a great this would be for this, this could be for this. That's going to be really good. I love this. We're not going to do that, but this is and and they're having this full on conversation and he's just doing it while he's listening to me about the next bit. And he would gets it. Every loss is simmer just trying to hang on to us going right, okay, yeah, and what does this mean? He's already got there and he's moved on to the next thing and he's got to where you're going to before you get there. So He's a smart, smart, smart cookie and he's definitely able to compartmentalize, so you can come up with the wise, you can do multiple things at once. So he's a very, very interesting chap, but he's also an actor, so there's always a performance to it as well, so it's it can be a can be slightly fallen from time to time, but anyeah, it was, it was. It was fun working with him, though don't really have asked me to work with him again, but yeah, did any thing months with him. It was good fun. Part would you say? It's time. I think. I think the big Cohuna time section of this podcast has rived. Then it's time for the BICKHUNA final question, and that is what what is the last great film you watched? And it can be a rewatch or a first viewing. That's a terrible question because you know that's so subjective. What was the last really great film I watched? Is that in terms of some of their left a mark. Shit. That is a good question and a terrible question same time. I could go through a whole all Raughterf the ridiculous thing about working entertainment industry is because I'm so bloody busy storyboarding, I don't get time to watch films very often. So the number of films I've got to watch recently have been peacefully small and I tend to actually end up watching a whole bunch of things at my child's they will to watch. So we've been going through a we've been going through a s being with it, walk semipins with her and I'm just learning to reappreciate how bad a lot of them are and how inappropriate a whole bunch of them are. But you know what I've got to say, out of the films I've actually watched with her over the last few months, of these of this s binge, we revisited the back of the future trilogy. Wow and classic. And I've got to say back to the future one, God damn, that's a tight film. It's a perfect's a perfect like, it's a perfect screen place. It is it's not just a perfect screenplay, it's just everything about it is so beautifully intertwine. I'MS intertwining it, but it's not just story, it's all those little bits and pieces of the hare. And then, you know, I mean you know the original original idea of, you know, charging the Dolore in with the energy from a from an atomic explosion, for instance. Because a budget three reasons, they changed into a lightning strike and you can't imagine how that film would work with anything but that lightning strike, because it's so beautifully executed. And I'm so I'm going to say you back to the future one and, to a certain degree, back to the future to were films that I really really did enjoy. And my child, my child, you know, hey, look, put an eight year on in front of a film. If they w watch it, then they like it, as opposed to get up and started to dance solfway through.

The film was just going or I'm going to do something else, I'm going to get them IPAD or whatever. And she watched back the future one and two. You know, she didn't move. What's your heart take on back to the future three, just while we're here? Well, it's the it's the it's the close of a trilogy. It does feel like it wasn't as fully baked as the first one, and the second one was pretty good, but it felt like, you know, it felt like it was it was one it just needs a little bit more time, and the other a bit like I'd say about, you know, the the Star Wars prequels, for instance, always feels like found of menace was one rewrite off actually being a really good film and, you know, the revenge of the sith was two rewrites of being a great film, and attack of the clones, unfortunately, about three he writes off being a good film, you know, and to a Citta agreed and said the same thing about at the back of the future. Three I felt felt like it just needed just that little bit more time on the Obum, but still pretty bloody time. But it feel like it was more revertly avert the retreading moments from the first particular the first film, but not as assuredly. It's funny that you bring up back to the future, because I was thinking about this earlier in the interview, that you sleeping for two hours and day and going from George Miller to George Lucas is like Michael j Fox going from family ties to back to the future, like in the same day. And he did that for months and don't know how he did it. I don't know how you I don't know how you slept for two hours and ate for months. I've got it, just tilly. One more story then, because I'm just trying to at this podcast last longer than it needs to and I'm going to bowl your audience. But these literally almost at the end of my time on on attack of the clones. I mean I think it was the week before I finished and I, you know, four months, two or three hours of sleep at night, you know, working in sane the stupid hours and Saturdays See Lucas at ten o'clock in the morning at's up on the edit sweet stage five, but showing the boards. He'd breathe me on what he wanted or not, brief me as a case maybe, depending on depending on how we what ideas had at the time, and then I'd go out, having written as many notice as I possibly good. I'd go and I would try and go and see a film because that was the only way I could actually power down so I could actually sleep that night. So they can get back up on the Sunday and start working again. And so and because I was wrecked on the Saturday and so the last whips that second last weekend and I came out and I was walking along towards the cinema. There's a cinema on the Fox Fox Studio Australia Lot one year to cinema and I heard this American voice going Oh, Oh, Oh, God damn it, and I turned around and there was this gentleman, older gentleman beard, this really quite at put was probably in his s where it was really ostentatious and Bright Hawaiian shirt and the biggest, God damn the satellite phone I've ever seen in my life. This is in the days, this is two thousand of the days before bloody iphones. And he had this, you know, everyone had to all knock. He isn't other roles. And he had this phone that was, like, you know, about a foot long. But then I had this antenna on it that was about what was bigger than actual phone itself and I just looked at it and I hadn't had any sleep and I just felt I was compuls and I had this compulsion to sit down it to him and talk to him about his phone. So I sat down that. So and I just went and he was getting it, looked at me and went hi. I went him stone, it's just blah, blah, blah, Blah Blah, and I just blathered him for about ten minutes about the phone and then I went on. Look anyway already. Sorry, I haven't any sleep, you know, working on a film here and you know I haven't for a while, so I apologize. I'll probably probably confused to US Alle I'm quite sure I have an in fact. So I'm just going to leave it. Thanks very much. Forgot to introduce myself. On really CREP at it. And as I wander off, he got me when. Okay, yeah, right, and then he got on the phone again. He pressed them and, Oh, I'm can you hear me? Good, what know, what's Francis? Francis von Capola? Oh my God, Oh my God, O Shit. So I walked away. Do Go, just talk to them. Man Who did upokalyps now and look, God father films and all those other Oh my God, Oh my God. And then Rick mcallum road passed and the producer on a golf cart and rip mccallums, the world's most dangerous driver, and a golf cut so he's skiddered...

...straight past me, Canda slamming hut. He went sexton. Great to see a great seer man, Francis Forbis in town. He's come to do Centropolis. He wants to do it here. We're going to get you within you're going to storyboarder, we're going to keep you in the family. It's gonna be fucking great. And I went rick, I don't think that's going to happen. And it didn't, and it didn't. So so did you know at the time where Francis Ford COPPO looked like? And you're just so sleep deprived. I will connected. Don't go damn time. I had not. It didn't even Oh my God, didn't even go off in my head that I was to win to Frances for Kabbala. I just was right in the prize of his fall. was looking at the phone. Big Yeah, one of those one of those moments. You just got only take that one back, please go out of Cheez. So ware it is one last question. So do you think Francis Ford like? Because you not getting the job is obviously a great end of the story because it makes it seem like friends for copple. I was like fuck the phone guy. But do you think he actually was like, no, the phone guy can't work on my movie? No, I don't think. Who knows? I don't know. Yeah, yeah, it just makes a good end of the story. The phone fuck, no, can work to that guy. No. Well, I actually to be to be to be honest, with intropolis film and he was going to shoot. Didn't happen. I think. I think he might be doing it now, or you? I think. I think it's all about doing it now. They're sly been talking about it, but that's twenty one years later. Maybe I should give me a ring. Yeah, Francis, I'm the phone guy. Are you very small mythos? Now that it's now, the technology has advanced and phones down a lot smaller. I think our professional really some ship can really take off. I absolutely it's not. It's not pillal technologically inhibited anymore. MMM, anyway, there you. So, you beauty. I think that's kind of a good way to end the episode. Part not that I think that was ex I'm like still a little bit in shock at the reveal of Francis scort Coppola being the person with the phone. But yes, that that is a great place. Ten this interview. It's the till yet, I guess. Just thank you so much, Mark Sexton, for talking with us. Thank you for asking me. He's the storyboard artist behind again DABE, a mission possible to Mad Max Fury Road and our movie for today, Star Wars episode two, attack of the clones. Again, thank you so much. Is a great interview, my pleasure. Well, make sure to point out you where your daughter is when the thor for comes out for full full yes, look for a right head. Righthead way is around load of the ground. WHA, there's a couple of shots. She might be philly friends. I will see. We'll see. Oh, cool, just just depends on whether the cut around it, because there was some. There was some there was a bit of fighting. These these kids were suppiced to do, and she wasn't very good at that. So all right, well, we'll keep the listeners and suspense. Will she be in it? Will she not? Yeah, we'll see how we go. Yeah, I mean here, guys, you can never tell what the marble film they so much stuff gets completely recontextualized to support the story and you sit there just get but a story about of that bed which was this and now it's over. There and it works totally differently. But you know, so we'll see how they go. They know they do not they doing in them mom with marble studios actually really look some very clever people there. Did you like in Turtles? I did. Yeah, I saw it on Saturday. And you, trench, did you watch it? And putting you? I have not seen a turtles yet. I can't speak on it. I defer all opinions to part they well, yeah, I actually the more I think about the more I appreciate what they did and I have a sneaking species. If I watch it on a second viewing I'm gonna like it even more. Very cool. All right. Well, that is craft services. Mark Sexton. Signing out. Signing up. Welcome back. Thank you again to mark Sexton, our wonderful guests. I really enjoyed that interview. Did you? I had a great time, I think, as we were a looting the friends sport copela story, stuff of the ages. Yeah, that's wild. Meeting...

...select meeting celebrities and, more particularly meeting directors, is like what I'm here to talk about. Like, I don't care if they're terrible people or what, but people who make this is a fun fact. Trent Loves Kevin Spacey. It is actually funny bring that up, because I don't. I don't condone rape in any of its. Trent, you were you were telling me just yesterday that look. Well, we'll end this bit. will end this bit for fear that Trent's mother listens to this episode and thinks that Trent was saying this. This is I'm gas lighting Trent Right, Harth, I, can we watch seven anymore? Don't do this. That's not you say this with the seven poster behind you. Yeah, it's true. Well, what's next week? Rend of the Sith? Oh, the conclusion of now winter. No, no, no, next week we discuss attack of the clones. Oh, sure, and you. I think we're going to have a guest on, like I can almost hear. Maybe, maybe, we have some interesting things planned. Who knows? Maybe it's going to be a return guest. Maybe. And then, yeah, and then revenge of the sith comes after. For the interview we have Assistant Camera Matt Toll. Yeah, he's very cool. And maybe for the discussion will have a wee little crossover. Yeah, yeah, it's funny to at a British accent because there might be a little and there might be a little crossover, well, ethnic flare. No, I'm saying as in, like to podcasts colliding at once. Yeah, like, we can't guarantee anything. We don't want to jinx it. We're you think that's gonna Happen? Yeah, yeah, maybe, if there's a scheduling disaster, if the Mayans were right and, you know, December twenty first rolls around and the earth crumbles, then we probably won't be able to do the episode. No, no, but, like, unless that happens, I think we're like in pretty good shape. I think so too. I should probably get around to scheduling that episode, shouldn't I? Yeah, all right. Well, we should probably get off the AIRC you can schedule all right. Want us to get off. It's a masterpiece and joke, I thought. I was like, is this from a movie that I don't know? And I was like I'm too tired to follow up, so I'm just gonna let it. I'm just gonna let it sit. All right. Go, follow our social media, go, go. Yes, you know the fucking Spiel. Just just do nice things for us. Say Nice things, yea, like support us. I give us a five star review on Apple. PODCASTS like be our friend, like give us a compliment, like whether it be about the show or just that parts handsome, which is true. You he is. Yeah, tell me I'm handsome, tell Trent I'm handsome. Tell Trent that he has a nice voice, because that doesn't have to do is his physical appearance. And how be a good way to side step the fact that I'm ugly, trance, a little transm lit. Ok, no, madness, as you know, is like gravity. Anyways, I just I don't know. All right, I'll go or done. It's over. It's over by done. Fuck team deacons. Roger Deakins is listening to this and he's like Po why would you say that? Wait, maybe we're gonna have way. He's also British. Maybe we're baby like crossover. Maybe they finally follow it up be email and they were like, dearest part and Trent, we have heard about your media campaign and we've started to pay attention. Well, we're not ready to devulge, but until then, fuck team deacons. Good night and good luck. Yeah, what is good night and of luck from.

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