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Episode 80 · 9 months ago

SCOTT PILGRIM (2011) with Storyboard Artists PART 3

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent finish up their conversation with storyboard artists Danelle Davenport, Oscar Wright, and Rob McCallum.

Edited by Parth Marathe

We are tonight's entertainment. You can't handle the truth. The fire risals pizza time. You're a wizard, Harry, so you know you think that's are you're breathing approving. I don't have friends through sus. H Barth, you're looking well. Thank you. You're looking pretty good too. We have a podcast. I'm dude. I guess we start this off by you know what we've been eating, but we both know what we've been eating because we ate it together. Part we had lunch. Call me crazy, I would never. And where was it? What was it? Tell the people at home, not Trent, you tell the people, because I just told you off there. You should remember right. So parts trying to embarrass me because I've asked him like three or four times to remind me of the name of the restaurant was, and I just off the air. I said, part, can you tell me what the name of what I ordered was, because it was Asian fusion and that's not really something I'm well versed in, and I believe the restaurant is called Gin. Soi You got off to a flying start and you wouldn't tell me the name of the dish as well. I was saying that. All Right, tell me. I'm asked me any further. No, I wanted to embarrass you on air and I wanted, like every fucking know. Yeah, I can't help it if I know more. It's not my fault, but I had the Chili garlic chicken and Trent, you shared a meal with my friend of the show, Jackson Clark, where he had a vegetable Gobie Manchurian and you had chili pitier. There you go. Yeah, and how was it? Did you like it? First timely, it was wonderful. Really. No, no, notes you said that it was like Indian parallel food. I mean, I mean it is like Indian food. Like it. Chili Panier is like a well, no, like, it's a pretty common. It's like a weird Chinese Indian fusion thing. You know. Well, now that we're all caught up on that, should we get to the show? Now? This is, yeah, the the grand finale of Scott Pilgrim month. No, well, the grandfather the finale of the wait net. But next week, like this interview is pretty cool, but this is but this is this is the grand finale of the interview portion of Scott Program Q. The intro welcome back to craft services, where we talk about the movies each week. We talked about a film and hopefully I have a crew member of the film to talk with us about their experience working on the picture. Wow, Trent, you got that word for word. I'm proud of you, my boy. Well, yeah, thanks. I've been working on the show for several years now, so I'd hope. I'd hope that I could do the introduction without the Google document up. But this is the the conclusion, the culmination of a almost two hour interview. This should tie up all the loose ends. If you listen to part one and two, you've been a little cliffhanger. I don't know where parth cut them, but hopefully it wasn't mid sentence. But we had some cool guests and we hope you enjoy it. Yeah, we had just to reiterate, we had Oscar Wright, a grest brother, dnil Davenport and rob McCallum talking. YEA, as storeboard artists on Scott Pilgrim and this one. We ask one Scott Pilgrim related question and then we started asking them about all the other cool stuff that worked on, which is like a lot. They worked on collectively, like a lot of movies. Would you agree? I would agree. I was. I was physically present for the interview, as far as I can tell Um. But let's like, like this interview is pretty cool, but one will trend. We how about? How about? How about? We? We do the we let the good people listen to the interview then and then it's that way coming next if they're kind enough to stay until the very end, like the last five minutes, then we could tell them what comes next week, because I'd say that's a major now on the way. Yes, something big coming, and it's that we're going to have a fourteen year old on our show. WHO THEY'RE GOING TO BE? Trent, you can say that. Who they're going to be. I'm not entitled to say, but they're a teenager and they're ready to talk, Skun talk. Yeah, all right, Martha, you q the interview. So I guess...

...the last Scott Pilgrim related a question will ask is Edgar. Right. I mean, obviously, Oscar, he's your brother, so it's might be a weird question, but it's just like how does how does he compare to other directors in terms of process or just working style or working collaboratively with the storebirard artist that you guys do it then able to okay, acar is like just amazing directed to work with and he's very inclusive. He really values your input, your work and he's yeah, it's really I always feel really privileged when I have a chance to work with him because I also learn a lot to you know, in each project is so different and again, and it's every director, like every project is different and they have their different ways of working and there are different processes and you know, you just have to be really adaptable to because they're also changing to the needs of their project. To Edgar can be like he he'll some directors don't plan anything out. Edgar really has a clear vision. Most of the time. It seems to be going into something and he's really good at giving you the information that you need to, you know, kind of kind of turn out the product that they can use. And so he's really pretty good about giving you thumbnails and you know, he has a kind thing of vision for the scene before it is you can set down to do it. So it makes the job really, really, really fun and a lot of ways. So yeah, but he's also open to you know, suggestions. You know, I'm trying to think of, you know, like I'm baby driver. There's a little bit more of that because there wasn't a book in hand to follow kind of thus road map of the Scott Pilgrim of comics had set out and had set up. So he you know, when you're doing a lot of driving charts on a last stunts, there's a lot of unknowns as you start to go into it and start to impap what is this actually going to look like? When you start getting things on page, on the page, that's when you started. His UVC's kept might be able to be around or might be able to be even related, and he's open to hearing all that stuff too. He wants the other to him. So yeah, from my side of it, I didn't really have that much to do with it. Good because basically because of Oscar had been a rod, you know, on it for so long and these actors, brother, he was much more kind of achieve because I was coming into and I was there was a lot of catching up to do as far as I was concerned on it. Usually I'll just work with the director, but because I was kind of coming in and of initially as kind of support because, you know job, I mean I saw saw it a few times, but most of the information that would that I'd be told to do with stuff that Oscar had gotten to the meetings for and stuff. So I actually didn't have, professionally, don't have that much to do with Edgar because all my information came from Oscar, which I would say is, you know, I'm like the translates it for a lot of people of the through line to egg when egg is not available. You know, that's what it's. It makes it makes perfect sense that in the context of there's usually another worked on films where, you know, you spend so much time with a director and you're hanging out and you're eating together and anothered other films where the I'm not going to see what film was, but the director of what hope by my desk and it goes, are you doing storyboards? And I yeah, nice and walked away because I wasn't really working with a director, and that when I was working for second Juna doing the stunts on that one. So that was that was fine, that was allowed. But mean, that's not look at all. That's terrible. It wasn't terrible. I was working for second units, done people. That's but yeah, it's basically it's good to keep information, the information flow clear and clean, because you can get an awful they can get awful the confusing otherwise, because you know, sometimes someone will say something to one person and I don't think, another person and forget that they've said that to one person. So yeah, it makes sense. Yeah,...

...obviously for me. I mean I realize it's been a it's been a joy working for I mean it's not as been easy. We've ban heads a few times, but the the shorthand that we've we had shorthand anyway. I think just because of history, grant. Yeah, but we but over years and over the projects, more of a shorthand is is, you know is it's been created. And a trust as well, and I think Scott Pilgrim is when I felt like I was in trusted to, you know, to take a lot on and sort of guide things through and and it it really helped. I could seek quite clearly how I was useful, you know, in not just in a department, mean rob but yeah, throughout the hut, all of the post stuff. There was a lot of postuff to do. But it in that art department that there was a cohesive vision that. I think I helped Marcus, production designer, get that across to everybody as well. It became a proper little unit, didn't it? The Art Department was very you know, every everybody's take, everything was getting really excited about it and it took a while. It wasn't instant, but you sort of built up this momentum and people were getting really excited about the prospects of this might actually work, you know, and and there and that was brilliant to be involved with and subsequently on, you know, a prior to that, obviously there was shown and hot first, but you Scott Pilgrim, was where I had a lot more to do and and it was. Yeah, it was incredibly I felt incredibly useful just being a like a bridge to take his brains sort of thing, like a fast track to make his brain for other people who couldn't because as been pulled in every direction. As you can imagine, he had so much to deal with. So when people wanted creative answer quickly, I was there. So that that was really handy. He got it. Just like rob said, there's a there was a through line of information and and that's as a as a story. But that is that's gold if you've got information on how the other departments of like, you know, making their decisions, and that's all you want. You want that. You want as much information as possible so you can tell the story properly. You know, that's that's untimately it. And you achieve the vision. If there's a clear vision, you want to achieve that vision and and that's and we were all on board to, you know, achieve at this vision. So it was yeah, and in terms of other films, yeah, I've had great fortune with that and obviously working on films outside a because films it's not quite the same, but I've had great experiences there too. But it's, you know, obviously mee being eggs brother is off forged me a lot of opportunities, you know, just in terms of that trust in the shorthand, you know, and being in the art department on his films is is just enormous fan and very, very rewarding. And I would say so we're on the home stretch. So for our respective questions, just since we're running a bit long and we we thought we'd do a rapid fire so we'll name a few. What? We'll name a few of your movies and then you pick one that to to comment on. Rob Your choices. Are It suicide squad or Pacific Rim who for Pacific Gameral? Do Tora? Oh, yeah, amazing. Yeah, that that was I was it was main blowingly cool. I'd make gear o before. He was doing hell boy too, and you he asked me to work on hell boy too, but my daughter was going to be born and I've been I didn't know. I wasn't able to leave the country to go and work on that. So that passed by. But then I got a call saying that from Carlo Spear, the production designer, saying...

...that it was going to be doing lends of madness, at the amounts of madness age people of craft one and did the one that the concept that were a concert job on that, because he did has a lot of concept artists. And then that went away. That but whatever happened, for whatever reason, that when down and then about the next week, I think there's the same studios, Pacific Room came and I got a I got a call for that. So I ended up. Yeah, I was on that for a good long time and possibly one of the most complicated films I've ever worked on, as far as you know, the technology go and Ilim were involved and there was. There was all these animatics being done. And then, because then, I think, I don't know if things were changing so quickly, but it was just it was easier to do board dramatics where you've got the story boards and they were they were animated and putting, you know, so in effects what I didn't stuff like that, and it was able to be turned around faster for changes or something. I think that was why. But not working for Garma was great. It was you had basically that you give us all the talk, because it wasn't just me. There was like I was the one initially doing boards and then there was Guy Davis from CISCO WHO's work with the Armorel at, both of them. I'm going to Miss People. I'm terribly sorry if I forget to add people that. There were so many people that with an entire wing of pain wide studios just full of gear. More on these artists. There was carlous and goodness, I feel terrible. Okay, I'm not going to see any names. There was a bunch of guys because I'm going to this some day and I felt but there was a ten of us in one room. At one point I was sitting beside Wayne Barlow and ty Rubin Ellison was on there and it was look, these these are guys whose work I have seen for years, and Guy David I was a huge fan of his work, and then you're sitting just getting to become friends with them and here we gave us a big talk saying, you know, we welcome to the project and stuff, and get me what I want first and then if you get any ideas, absolutely do a lot. So yeah, that's that was a good way of working, because you knew that. You knew that you were don't know what he wanted, and then if there was any other ideas, it's like it's like a director said to me once, the good ideas are mainly bad ideas or yours. So you end up and it was. It was. It was a long, long thought a job, but especially as as we were kind of animating the boards, I found that I was I was doing like a step more than I would have done in the storytelling visually, because you know, you do somebody pulling back and then you know usually do a robot pulling back and then punch him seriously the effect of that. But then you had to basically draw up on all in between. I'm acting there, so you wouldn't say you did in between, just before the point of contact, so that when it was animated you would actually see it, you know, a bit of rough a thematic but going going down to say it and seeing the the giant the giant robot heads and stuff like that was just incredible to see, because he is he hugely complicated hydraulic robots and stuff, and I I was it wass quite a lot of that. was quite the experience. We're just getting to tongue up at a job and glory I am today. I am drawing there's monster fighting this robot and as this isn't going to start dreaming, and you know that's this is. This is wild, you know, and like the drawing sequences will. We always went big and we were well aware that we were probably just, you know, we we're becoming the script for these fights at some points. You know, we even Hong Kong Fay. No, I don't think doesn't do the Hong Kong Fay, but I think I did suggest the using the boat as a club that's well than I may be wrong. I may be wrong, but I'd suggested using that Doub submarine as a club for the end fight underwater, and then I bought turned up in the Hong Kong fect. I don't know. I may just have been two people having the same idea, but you know, wow, it got to be on screens. That is yeah, I know, I was C it was brilliant. In the film I did, I did the opening with the knife head...

...and the finale and I did the big finale with the them going under water, which looks like. I mean it's not often you get to see a film where the story boards look exactly like what you see on screen because there's usually a weeper. Actually, Scott Pilgrim was one of those ones where, yes, like exactly as boarded completely. And it's not just when I was it's not normal because you know the things happen when say those have ideas and stuff like that. And Yeah, I just just about everything, although with the ND sequence, that was when I boarded it. It was absolutely huge, absolutely huge, and there was there was stuff happened that didn't make it into the final film and I actually more than makes sense because it was, you know, you could the character's goal is to put the bomb into the into the breach and seal the breach and that's it. And then there was all this other stuff. It really was quite distracting from there, from the the kind of the goals of the characters at the time. But it was a huge, big, huge action sequence. But most, most of it was exactly as boarded. And then the other stuff that was in film was like these crazy, huge, distracting action sequences that didn't know who fo will pitch when I think my idea, but with some of the ideas that are throw and there. But yeah, I was so yeah, and I working working with the Earl was something I'd always wanted to do and and seeing how he works and and yeah, just getting to work with them was very cool. Danelle, your choices are first man, Shan Chi at men, guard means of the Galaxy and little women. So quite quite the pick of the letter. Well, maybe I'll talk about I'll say really quickly. Oh, that's all. I'll pick first man, just because I really I I my favorite movies to work on tend to be ones I've learned something on, you know, and I love Sean. She I mean, I want to talk about Shan she because I know everybody wants to hear about that, but I am first man. It was just such an interesting project to work on. I learned so much about the space program the sixty I thought I knew about it, but I really didn't understand the the personal story behind the individuals that were the test pilots in the astronauts and things like that, and I think that, you know, you know, Damien had, you know, vision to try to really tell that personal story and he really really succeeded in doing that. And and it was kind of very emotionally fraught in a lot of ways because it's part of our all of our history. And I remember one of the scenes that I really stuck out to me was two scenes. One was when the three guys, chaffee, Chi is, mm and white get, you know, the doing the plugs out test, the capsule catches on fire and then they're killed and I literally had to you know, I was trying to figure out what this will look like and and I just was really aware that, you know, the flames would be a certain color depending on what was burning. Is and that cockpit and I had to research what was burning in that cockpit and why that cockpit burned the way did. That caps will burn the way it did, and it was kind of you know, it's when something's real history like that and it's a part of our history, of our country and in your in that moment and you're in in the in the story because you're working on the movie. It was really just a really moving story to work on and and I just got very kind of emotionally involved in it. Oddly enough, which I don't really do. I have fun on these movies a lot of time, but not in the same way then I did on first man and and I, you know, I had to you know, when you learn that, oh, the reason why that burned is because they had they had oxygen. They were locked in there, they had oxygen flowing into those guys and there was all these nylon fittings in there that went. I like that as soon as the axet cop fire and you know, it's was just very interesting, you know, and I but it also, you know, I really had a good time also doing the scene where he ejects out of the lunar land or the test vehicle, and I didn't realize that they had had to test all those things on planet earth under different, you know, conditions of gravity and just it was just really interesting learning how he's got it what. You know, one of the things I...

...learned on that I always thought, oh, why don't they put an parachute on every person who gets on a commercial aircraft? You know, if the plane starts to go down, the compliant can hit a button. You could peel back the top of that like a sardine can. Everybody could hit the eject button on their seeming boof, we don't find me float down to the ground safely. No, but I realized, when the last things in the world you want to do is to eject it from a moving aircraft, just how dangerous that is. You can if you're going a certain velocity. You know, I don't terrible, terrible things will happen to an individual who ejects out of an aircraft, you know. And so like he had to be, you know, facing that. That Lunar Lander had to be position a certain way from R for him to eject out or he'd be ejecting into the earth. And you know. So, you know, I learned a huge amount and I turned towards I know, I'm a huge space tech nerd and yeah, that I just I loved every minute of working on that at first. I think you've just told us a lot of thanks. Don't eject out of a moving aircraft, and was absolutely necessary. Don't want to end up like you, skin get peeled. I was thinking of there's less gravity and top gun. As far as I we call like you know what I mean. It's not gonna operates on its own set of physical laws. Exactly. It's a crucipal loser. Yes, exactly. Okay, and ask her to close this out. Your options are. Last night and Soho, Acorn, IMDB, you appeared as a storm trooper and Star Wars, last Jedi, wonder woman, baby driver or the Cornetto the cornetto trilogy. Okay, I'll quickly run the street. So little correction. I was in last Jedi, but not as a storm tree if I was a rebel, oh, it's me, and me and my brother were rebels and along with eggs producer and Assistant Leo, and Joe Cornish as well, and we were all in the same scene as rebels, all in rebel gear, and it was in the cavern at the end. We share a scene with were you with Gareth Edwards? No, that was another that was the scene outside. That was in the battle aside. We were inside and we were in a talking as scene with sea troopo and to know it's seats with going Bba. I think it our CD. Yeah, I TDT wasn't there and I think was he and maybe even there and but it was Oscar is it and John Bray and just see, just witnessing all that was was it was just a day of at a joy just running around ham of studios, meant to be. We we weren't meant to be running around where. We were going to all these departments, the seeing or the and we were in full rebel gear and we had we got to choose our guns and we got that and it's just like, you know, you don't get to do that much. It's hard to not act like a kid when you're holding a blaster. You know. Yeah, yeah, it was just it was just delirious fun. You're transported. You're a twelve yearold again, basically, but quickly. One woman had a great time with page Jenkins. It was a totally different experience to what I used to I didn't actually feel like I helped out on that film a great deal. I don't think I was actually that much use on it, but I had a good working relationship with her and she did teach me a few things. As a few things I we got to talk about. We were talking about things very frankly throughout the whole film and I got to see things that I didn't think would work and she proved me wrong and I got to tell I've met her since and I got to tell her that is well, I said, I can apology because I didn't think that would work and you made it work. So you know, I I learned. I learned a few things from here. But I will say, just because it's so fresh and just because we're also proud of it, is last night so an in an immense amount of creative joy on that movie. You know, bringing that to you know, to making Acre's vision a reality was as a big deal. There was a lot of hurdles, a lot, but so much creative juice is flying on that. When I would say and yeah, the whole crew,...

I mean I would say one of my one of my favorite memories this year actually is the custom crewse screening. And you know, because we had to wait a long time, but obviously I was during lockdown. We were like completing that movie over Zoom. You know, we were seeing all the vffects come to life when, you know, it was like a skeleton crew, you know, the vfx team at you know, this was when everything had broken right down and we done our reshe it's on it and they worked out really well and I think we will. We were one of the first productions to get up and running. We on Pine Wood. We there were pinewood is usually full of star wars, full of marvel films, and the only and it's a huge site and the only two films that were happening was us doing our resheets for the last night and Soho and drew the latest dressic world movie, and we were the only two thing. And this entire you know, it's the entire studia happening, and that was a very strange experience but really good, a good one. All the restrictions made it actually move faster. We all thought it would be slower, but because it was so regimented and there was no hanging around and likely, you know, you know, we all had to be very, very focused about what we were doing and it went by we you know, we've got everything we wanted to get, which is fantastic, and then it was V effects after that. But you know, cuts to the cars and crease screening after such a long way, and you know everybody had done films in between and stuff, which is usually a case with cuts and green screens. But I just remember seeing everybody come out of that cast and crease screening and it was, you know, just beaming faces. It was people just beaming with pride. They were also proud of because I think what why good managed to do. I think Robin now what it tested. This is one thing I can manage to get is all the craft out there on the screen, like everybody's heart work is at their own screen and you can really recognize it all. You know, everybody feels like they've done that job on that movie and I think you'd agree when you guys that absolutely yeah, for sure. Yeah, I said. And Yeah, that was one of my sort of, you know, most cherished moments is just seeing the whole creuse faces coming at you know, just beaming with pride. You know, it was fantastic, which can't be said for old films. So yeah, that was. That was very special part. Is it usome Trent? Do you think it's it's the time. It's time for our big KAHUNA final question. So I don't know who'd like to start, but we ask all of our guests at the end of the interview what the last great movie they watched. was. Not Good, great, great, okay, I think, I think, I know that. My aunt was going to be the same as all scores. Okay, wait, till looking. What's The critaire here? Wait, tooking new movies right now, but recently it can be anything. And if you re watch Scott Pilgrim for the interview, maybe we don't count that. Yeah, okay, right, but the last one isn't time. Okay, well, probably, probably the new June. Oh impress. And that's just basically because I just watched a vide video recently that are other Greek movies. Have seen deal saw last night and Soho and I thought I loved it, absolutely love to, but I saw Juan just off to so has to be loved. KNOW ANYTHING COMING TO MIND FOR YOU? Gosh, you know, I I there's some so many that I really love and like. Did you see last night so which I really love really suck. Yeah, I know it. She hated it, but I just thought, no, no, I sound like a right but I thought I saw it Monday and that's the one that's most fresh in my mind. But the the other I can't. We've had some really talented people come on here and literally be here for ten minutes because they're like, I have no clue what I just watched, I'm so busy. I know,...

I know, I just you can circle back to me. Oh, and try and think all Alan. Agree with Rob June was staggering to me to see on the big screen. Interestingly, the latest, the last film I've watched, literally last film I watched, me and my wife and I because she hadn't seen it and I wanted to see again, is the original west side story. Well, and it's just astonishing that film. That is an incredible film and I can't wait to see spill Bergs, when I haven't seen it yet, come way. I've heard. I've heard good things, but yes, I've really really can't wait. To say it's an unenviable task to remake that good of a movie from fifty years ago, but if anyone can do it's uncle Steve. You know and yeah, no, I totally agree. And he's wanted to do a bottle of counts it. You know, you've heard that. He's wanted to do it for a long, long time and Bowler can shows is like he's had the way he's going to do this down, you know, for a long time. And it and I've heard that it's just full of that great energy that you know it's you know. I mean that's the thing. Yeah, you can you recognize creative energy. You can see it. You know when someone's got a fire in their belly and you know, a sat there on a screen, and I think, I think June comes down to that as well. You can see that this guy has been thinking about this for a long time and how to do this and it shows. And Yeah, I put it up there with fo fo shier visual like astoundingness. And you know I'm talking about seeing on the cinema where it really Knoxi for six. For me, June is up there with, in recent years, spider verse, which Knoxi for six. Spider verse absolute blooming away and prior to that, man Max Fury Road. Fury road just you have flaws. You with its creativity and same again with spider verse and for June. Yeah, I was. I was blown away that he managed to make a very convolated, you know, heavy silfi story, you know, quite narratively simple, but the the Shis scale that he managed to get across on screen and just to make you an awe of everything, you know, really the non action visuals that just flow you. You just say. I just remember being totally blown away by pull the tradies and his mother walking across the Tal Macu, that the yeah, where they all landed the Iracus for the first time, and just then walking crusted the run, the runway at the time, I basically and the skin of everything in the background and just it was one of the most beautiful shells in the movie. And it's like it is. It's just the compositions and the scale he achieved and the beauty of the shot, you know, and it said, wow, this is cinema, that's pure cinema, you know. So, yeah, Danella, did you get anything to anything jog your memory? Yeah, that's right, just as a nod, dish long she I guess right. You know, I gotta get that in there. I did watch a lot of martial arts movies for to for prepping that, you know, her doing the fight scenes and things like that, and I rewatched, you know, cushing tiger and Hidden Dragon. And how's The flying daggers? Yes, you know, blew me away visually. I just, you know, do just just blew me away and I absolutely loved them and I also I also lived thing I learned. I always learned one thing from each movie. Work on. One is, like I love Jackie Chanah, yeah, because I took away. I think I saw Jackie Chan movie. Everybody. Man, yeah, yeah, but but yeah, I hadn't seen house a flying daggers, and when I watched it, I just it's just so visually stunning. It's just amazing. Of interest. Which Jackie Chan films did you watch in preparation or how your favorites for you know, Oh, my favorites, you know. I surprisingly I am a big fan of the original karate kid. Oh,...

...yeah, the original. Yeah, I hadn't seen and I watched it for this, you know, and I actually really loved it. To you, the the remake with always Jackie Chat. Yeah, with Jaden Smith. Yeah, he's in that Nice. Yeah, Jackie. Yeah, yeah, I've got from I love I'm you're going to give. I'm gonna tell you all my guilty pleasures, like High Moon, you know, a rush hour rush our to last week, you know, Oh shit, sorry, seeing a change, you know, great fun. Oh, yeah, yeah, you know. So I'm a huge kind of play story. That was when I was just going to ask out of interest. Do you know if police story was like I feel like the stuff on the bus is kind of clearly yeah, and Chunk Che taken from a police story? I don't know, I don't know. I'm not pretty to that. And now if you're going that's if you want Jackie Chan from watch police story. It's I think I want to speak at him, but I think that's that's me and my brother's favorite and we preserved we said that. I think Brad Adam asked us what was that favorite, because he's from Jackie chance dunting, and he asked his favorite Jackie channels and we both said please story. And I've got a full soft spot for project a as well, but police story, Brad. I remember Brad just nodding and setting it. That's Jackie's too, and it's something that's Jackie's favorite. So it's too good. It's yeah, it's and that's another thing. You know, it's that creative vision is clear. Jackie Chan is all over those movies and it you know, it's his vision and my God, you know it's so they're just incredible movies. Part you want to bring us out. Yeah, no, wow, this is this has been a wonderful long time. This is, I think, the longest in eview we've ever done. It was all all great, though. Thank you so much to all of our guests, rob the Callum, Danelle Davenport and Oscar right for joining us and talking about their time on Scott Pilgrim, among other awesome, amazing movies. Thank you, guys so much. This ISS really been awesome. Thank you you very much. It's been nice to have an excuse to get that memory name. Yes, Hey, Trent, wasn't that what that interview? We finished it. We did it. Best month long interview ever. It only took a month. One month long interview. Yeah, trench a little annoyed with me because I said something pretty rude to him that you guys, you will never know about. No, tell them what you said, like take the names out of the equation, but no, tell them what you said. Well, Trent was talking about a certain person that he and I collectively know and was saying that he had previously, at lunch, been making fun of them, him and friend of the show Jackson Clark, and saying that he was painfully boring, and he alluded to the fact that he said that again just now, and I said that he was being Maine and that he was not that bad and it could not possibly have been that bad because I have also run into per said individual on the street and had to talk to them and they were perfectly fine, not like my favorite person or something, but like very nice. And he said, Oh, the best five minutes of Your Life, Huh, and I was like yeah, certainly better than talking with you. And he said that if we weren't recording, he would have left the call, because it's kind of like my stick is whenever you say something like mildly annoying, I can just hang up. Yeah, it's a nice card to have in my back pocket, and then I have to send you an apology text like thirty minutes later. You don't. You don't tell me the apology texts anymore. But like whenever I tell Trent like things he should be doing more in his life, like he often just like leaves because he's like parth. You don't get to tell me that. You don't get to be right. And now translate. Really, you guys can't see it, but trees like really uncomfortable and annoyed looking at me. But that's okay, because I'm allowed. I'm going to give him a great honor, and the honor I'm going to give him is the ability to say who's coming? Who is it? We're having the big guy.

Wow, who is that? WHO's the Big Guy? He's the biggest guy I know, and that is local team vage marat a wow, of what. What High School does he go? Do? Bridgewater? Oh, he doesn't go to he don't go to high school, though. He goes to bridgewater, Rareton Middle School of Bridgewater, rare to middle school. Wow, we got a middle school or on our show. Dude, we scored a middle schooler. Yeah, no, we're pretty awesome, but he's old for his great technically he should be high school. Well, that's a relief. It's kind of basically almost a high school or on the show. Yeah, remember when we started the show and varage said if we ever did Scott Pilgrim, he had to be on the show, our show crafts. Well, like, he didn't really say that. I kind of like, okay, it kind of was like I don't know, that'd be kind of cool and I was like, you know, we're getting you on. Wait, I thought he was more enthusiastic about it. Is this you're doing? It's like set like he wanted to be on the show and I said yeah, no, you'll be on. Tate wants to be on, but she texts me the other day and she was like watching the Mandalorian. It's really good. I should talk about on your show. And I was like a Trans Sistor, by the way. I was like, do you think we're a TV podcast or not? I was sorry. I was like pick a movie and we can talk about it. But you know, but for Raj for rage chose wisely. Shuts chose a movie, and a good movie, a movie we like to talk about. I'm excited to talk about it. Yeah, it too. I feel like this is the most like fun movie we've talked about in like a while. Most last time you had fun on the show. Oh Wow, long really really making me go back. Wow. Yeah, no, I'M gonna have to wow big our inch. I started went two thousand and twenty. That was a pretty great year. Yeah, it was twenty. Wow, I'm looking at our episode list trying to drum up fond memories. Wait, wait, well, on January second of two thousand and twenty two, I had fun star Wars Ovid Yeah, for yeah, yeah, that was we recorded that on my mother's birthday, December twenty, two thousand and twenty one. Okay, so that clears that. I haven't had fun the whole year then. Yeah, no, two thousand and twenty twenty not sucks. Not, not until the big guy comes on the show. Yeah, I think that's really said. That's really going to spark. That's going to spark something in me. It's going to it's pretty awesome release my inner child, like varage. A child WHO's coming on our show? Yeah, a middle schooler. Yeah, we scored a middle school are all right. If you can give us a good rating on APP podcasts and leave us, you know, nice words, that'd be nice. If you can give us five stars spotify, that'd be great to see. Please follow our instagram our twitter. We post updates about what's coming out every week. You know, it's a good time. You should follow it. Nice good sales pitch, Barth. Thank you. I hope everyone liked parth's new intro. Way To go parth. Yeah, no, yeah, it did, by parth marathe it, and next week we'll be hearing yours. Yeah, we'll see about that. And then what? And then that? No, no, yea, no, like, I'm down. But then the fans can choose team trend or team parth. Oh yeah, we probably should. Maybe we'll make like a little thing on Instagram, put out a little pole, like a like, well, well, like create like a clip, as if we need further division. You know, I know, it's like civil war in here. Yeah, it's tense at all times. All Right, I'm ready, I'm calling it. I don't want to deal with you anymore. Part I'll eartily hate you like I would rather talk to person x port is. please. No, I'm just kidding. Twenty, twenty, I'm just kyting. You know that I love you. My Skin it's burning. You're a big guy, all you. parth. Can you edit in an explosion? When? Right now? Oh Yeah, wait here, just to end the episode, can it be a nuclear bomb? Sure, can we do? Think we can time it so that we can scream and then the episode can ready. Oh my skate let, it's so much pain. Oh wait, I think the bomb is about it. It's about the skin. It's B it's interesting how the bomb hit me so much earlier than you like.

It took a long time to get to you. It was the fallout. Wow, that's pretty awesome day. Does this mean we survived? Or maybe maybe this is what heaven is like? It's hosting a weekly film podcast part of it. That's not heaven. I don't know. It is with that, don't go out copyrighted all ready for this. Wait part. Can you edit in a song? Sure, why not? Guys,.

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