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Episode 79 · 7 months ago

SCOTT PILGRIM (2011) with Storyboard Artists Part 2

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent's discussion of Scott Pilgrim vs. the World with storyboard artists Danelle Davenport, Oscar Wright, and Rob McCallum continues. They also unveil their new opening. 

Edited by Parth Marathe

We are tonight's entertainment. You can't handle the true the fire risals pizza time. You're a wizard, Harry, so you know, you think that's where you're breathing. Povy, I don't have friends. So far. What do we believe? Looking well, by the way. Thank you you too, trentster. I had chicken and some Zucchini. HMM, my roommate chloe cooked it. Friend of the show. Friend of the show and a phantom menace episode. That's incorrect. No, King of sound island episode. Yeah, sorry, but it's okay because right after having dinner, Parts Female Housemates we've been on the show with see names, you know. Yeah, but as of recording, tomorrow is friend of the show, Clara Pell's birthday. Good to know. Yeah, so we make we baked a cake to get click. Claire Bell, if you're listening to this, Scott Pilgrim, part two episode, happy late birthday. Yeah, well done. Yeah, well done, twenty one trips around the sun. Congratulations. How about you go drink one beer, just one. Yeah, yeah, a beer, yeah, one. anyways, Trent, what did you have? I had here. I've got a visual representation Annie's fruit snacks. I'm sure you're familiar a house, so I staple also their overstock crafty from a thing I did and I got to bring home this whole thing Annie's fruit snacks, and I like, well, just fruits next to but this is an interesting, interesting, interesting competition, you know. Yeah, sure do. Well, we have a movie podcast. No, we do, much to my sugrin. Much sure, collective, against our best efforts. Yeah, and on top of that, we have a new intro. Right, Oh God, Damn. Yeah, part that. We've a new intro. Yeah, well, wait, so they answer recording. We have not as of yet edited this Intro, but when you you will have already heard it, so it'll have come before these words. Yeah, so, like, let us know what you think. We'll still have our theme music, like in a few seconds. Right, Oh, I'm not an asshole. Trend. Okay, cool, but yeah, we'll have two new themes, I think, like one for the interviews one for the discussions, and it'll be pretty cool. Yeah, I edited this one. And when it comes to our discussion with verage Murat, a part who part just off camera, called the Big Guy. Is that what you said? I just said we got to interview the big guy next week. I said. WHO's that? He said Varage, my fourteen year old brother, the big guy. Yeah, but for that one you'll be hearing trends. INTRO. Yes, so if you want to start, if you want to heighten the tensions between part and I comment which one you prefer, as if there wasn't enough conflict already. Pick a side. HASHTAG team parth Q. The intro. Yeah, let's cut to that. Nice little music. Welcome back to cras services. We have a podcast where we talk about the films, films, movies. Each week we have a film and hopefully have a crew member of that film to talk with us about the experience working on the picture. Sure. Yeah, this week, though, we have the same crew members as last week. Yeah, this is like a crazy little thing. We're doing that. As you know, Felis in the last week. The interview is so long that we split up into three parts. This is part two, so this will be like the Middle Chunk of the conversation, with three of the Stuart word artist. So this is like...

...the meat and potatoes. This is the middle section, like that's the heart of the interview. It's a pretty, pretty interesting interview, guys. I'm really excited for you guys to listen to it. They talked about working on Scott Bill Grim and you know, they each give their own little things and and they all say words, each of they do. Yeah, they say words interest in something, sometimes sentences there I say, but without further ado. Should we just get right on into it? Let's just cue the sound fact. Yeah, let's see. Yeah, cue the interview. So you alluded to the original ending. That was reshot and, just for fun for the people at home, what was the original ending? He went with knives, not remarking, and it was shot and it's a it's on the it's on the extras, on the disks, I think. I think it is. Anyway, yeah, it is. Yeah, it was. It. Was it a test audience reception thing? Yes, it was test audience. Is. It was how the books were originally going to and I think that's how they I'm not. I'm trying to think now. Did he change that? Is, he was going to have it as knives? I didn't. I can't remember now how the books and I should have looked into it. Basically, test audiences felt that him and Ramona in the end. Yeah, so he changed it to manner as well. That's what I thought. Yeah, that's it, but originally he was going to do knives. I'm pretty I maybe the maybe Brian's listening to this and screaming that wasn't the game, but that that's how I remember. I hope that's right. And you know, he was all for a subverting how you know how it should be, you know how how it should go. He wanted to subvert your expectations. But the audiences felt probably right me. So that it's Scott should be. Has Been Fighting for Amon all this time, and so they did the reshoot and it's the the same. We would all talking about this prior. That the saving grace to it all the reason it doesn't leave. It's right. The ending is right, but they really this super sweet sort of Cherry on top, is that you don't feel bad for knives because she has that amazing line and to cool for Una and and he agreed and that's exactly right and it's, you know, a sub brilliant ending to her arc. You know that she grows, she grows out of it and basically and she grows beyond them just in the time they've been together, which is, you a fantastic and my story. Yeah, so I mean like this movie has a really specific and precise visual style, I mean at compared to other movies, and so does. Did that kind of put you in a box of the ways that you are? Okay? Yeah, so, just like, if you could, if you guys could all just speak on that, I'd like to. I'd like to start actually with something bring you, you guys, in on this. It must have been strangely, because I remember adopting when I was boarding, because I first thought the first job I ever did on this was an animatic. I designed an animatic based on the artwork from the comics and it was a little it was the fight with tell and it was how...

...to stage that and how we were going to animate the to D animation, and we've really didn't bend from that throughout the whole thing. We we wanted to do this and want of these crazy td graphics on it, which no one was doing at the time. We we would, I think we were being quite bold in that sort of wish to let's bring these td graphics on the screen that Gray, you know, because I did that and because I did it in the style of the Book my boards. Sort of and organically, we're just my version of the comic. They weren't trying to look like real people. My boards were very comic, bookie, and I remember both of you sort of both of you were being a bit constrained to having to din the car team look, because I just I was Falcy, youtube basic. Yeah, we but not. I mean it's it's fair. I drawin a lot of different stales, I drawin a lot of different stuffs and Havn't to kind of I don't know it was. You can see the first boards I did. I think. I think it was like a chem's kind of don't do the buying thing. Yeah, the drums, I was one of the first things I actually dead and yeah, it took a week oil to get it used to drawing an Oscar's version of brilliant stale. It was killing. It was such a and now you too, I think you had to do cut and paste initially, didn't you? And then it was I realize how constrained that was, and especially for other people to get on board with instead, and I admit, like egg did ask me when it's like, couldn't you start drawing them, like you know, I think naire even in that the producer, she even asked me as well, could you start making a look more like humans had I flatly said no, this is good form. I just got used to doing this, you know, and I didn't want this change of styles throughout the how so it became quite sort of it's just that. Okay, this is how it is, you know. Yeah, and the boards were so important. Think of ever what on a movie where, I mean I want to troms with the boards uncredibly important and heavily stuck to. But this was, this was the next way of all. This was something else, you know. It wasn't just a style choice. There was a reason behind it. It was to get, I think, what I've learned throughout test phase, because I did some little animations to just to help people get their head around. I did, I did. Do you remember that Diagram animation? I did the little thing where it was literally, okay, he's running across here, puntries of here, punt that, this pie in the air and he jumps up. Well, and it was just making a diagram. I animated a diagram of this one movie. It was in the patal fight, because lots of people just couldn't get their head around how far we would how looney tunes this was. So I said, this is if this was physically happening, this is actually what you know. And and so I think the rhyme and reason behind me sticking rigidly to this sort of cartoony nature of the boards is because we weren't trying to do real life stuff, you know, we were trying to, you know, adapt this comic and these crazy things happening in this comic and on set. I...

...think it did help everybody get into the mindset that this is this is not you know, the reality is out of the window, you know, and you know when you because these boards made it onto set. They were, you remember this, rob they were printed up on a big white board and it was, you know, they were for everybody to see, everybody to get get their head around exactly what they were doing that day, and I think it really helped. I think it helped just people get into the mindset of how crazy this thing was in what we wanted to do. And I even remember at one point I think I spent. It wasn't just me, it was just anybody that didn't have anything to do or walked by and looked the wrong way towards us was given the job of beastly cutting note the speech that the son effects because it was there. So the fix from either the comic or stuff that were in the boards and they had to be something the cut own piece to done green and it was. It was like I was a lot remember doing that. I kind of remember and I think it was either just for the rough visual we face, which it was, to get Volun was pretty stunt team for their previous was Y. Yeah, yeah, so that the late Brad Allen. We got to work with Brad Allen and sadly died this year. And how is he? Because he was he worked with Jennings and ride. Incredible Energy, incredible guy to work with. If you got him on side, you you know you got, you just got gold, you just got he was capable of. Yeah, he just lifted things and all the old techniques that he employed, new techniques and old techniques, though there was some real crazy, old fashioned stuff. That really the Jackie chancellor staple stuff, you know, all the tricks, but he'd employ. He was very up on all the new digital realm that we were entering into and and virtual cameras and things. I worked with him a few times and you know, incredible guy and the team. He'd always get the best in the world to be there, like specific shots in that movie, the amazing overhead shot when Scott Pilgrim enters the club and takes on all the henchmen and and he's got his sword and turns the war into coins. And there's no head shot where he's whirling around taking a he hunted down the one guy in Toronto he could do that and he's the young kid and and it was just you're, you know, watching the rehearsals for that. Is that your drawers on the floor. Is is these guys are incredible. You know, they're they're hitting their marks, they're they are perfect in frame. And we also had one of the best action direct cinematographer's time, Bill Pope, still under the best and hey and and he friends the action perfectly as well. And and yeah, you're your jaws on the floor watching those guys. So, yeah, that's Brad just opened their eyes to a hold new world which was incredible. And Yeah, working with him some of my we had some stuff to do. We had a whole new end fight to work out because the the original we had a giant robot at the end of the original thing...

...and there were designers down for that, rudimentary designers. You never went too far down the road, but that's what we were planning. And then they got to be a fight and they were very the sword fire the end was basically brought together through quite a few things. One of my fund memories actually was with that. I don't think michaelple calls on side. So we had to work out this fight and it was just an email chain between me a grand brad and we were basically writing out the beats of this fight and it was going between we were pinging around between us and it was one of those little creative moments where it's just in written for then it gets to being drawn form, then it gets rehearsed and they and this was in the space of a week, you know, and and that's what ends up on screen and it's yeah, it was a really lovely intimate little process of just writing this thing out first and you know it was it was just just just solved one particular problem. That is the best way of doing it and getting to work with someone like Brad who those that stuff backwards as do all that stuff. Yeah, it's incredible to whatever him. Sad enough, even that you all doing the boards in a more cartoonist style was like unusual. Does it, like is the approach to the boards always to make it like as naturalistic as possible or like how it's going to look on screen? No, I would say so. Would you, I mean, what would you guys think? The say to that we all have different purposes, you know, every project that's a different set of kind of goals that you're trying to problems you're trying to solve. Every production has a different kind of unique fingerprint, you know, sort of finger prints. And I think with what I found interesting about doing first of all, you know, having to drive a completely different style. I never had to ever drawn swim in the Anim Ma style. But what it did to frtunately, I was switching to this and ti get the time. So I was it's actually trying to be an easy way to kind of slide into doing digital boards and then working on a going from paper to like a smooth glassy surface as a weird to draw on, you know. But for me, when one of the things that I think is really successful in keeping that very flat graphic style, I was up, I was wondering if the film would seem flat, and it's not at all. It's super dimensional. What I really think it did, and this seems that I was working on we worked to a lot of transitions and, you know, I think that's one thing I've learned from working with Edgar is I really paid a lot of attention to a transitions and they're really interesting ways to get from shot to shot and seemed to see and you know, you have those scenes where you're holding tight on Scott or Steven Stills and then the background change, so we're back we we're like walking on the street, but now we're in their house and the in practicing in the band. And what it does is it it's a different it creates a different type of cinematic effect where it's not just deep space or action crashing in a camera. It's a quieter way of moving through space. But it also keeps us in Scott Pilgrim's head the whole time, so we're always in Scott pilgrims world and the world is moving around him, and so these graphic elements are big part of creating that frame for him to move through. And when I saw the movie I was just kind of...

...blown away how cinematic all of these two dimensional graphics were became, and I think that, I mean, I don't know, but you know, everyone has their whole whole process, but it was really interesting for me to see, going from the original drawings and thinking I wonder what it's going to look like and seeing the final product, just how cinematic two dimensional, you know, working on the XY axis, not always working on the why ass is coming to you can actually be very, very cinematic in different ways. So it's really I think, think it kind of expanded my vocabulary. For sure, my visual vocabulary, without a doubt. You know I'm working on that. and seeing that were they're scenes, I mean like other than the ones that you guys have talked about already. Were there scenes that were like particularly difficult to draw or to like conceptualize? I mean I feel like the whole movie is difficult to conceptualize, but just like specifically, and conversely, if there were scenes that were like this is the most fun to draw, and maybe there's like some overlap between those two. I know you guys go I looked out that stuff from the rock see fight and I enjoyed doing that. Because I think I had actually weakly found a kind of happy, happy medium with the stable I was drawing, and so I wasn't having to worry about that and then I was able to kind of work on the storytailing and the shorts and stuff and be able to and that's a great fight in the maybe as well. It's it was great fun. Any one. Yeah, all the shapes, that amazing thing. That film at Ault definitely as well, which is like everything as a different style and it's tremendous. But that the yes, they're rock they're roxy fight for me, because I think I was able to relax, or I know because I wasn't trying to. I don't have to worry about this. It's weird we're all talking about this stay a like it was like, Oh my God, this stay always so hard to dry. It wasn't really, but it was basically just we wanted all the boards to kind of float together and look like a single piece right reading, when you don't have to make the act them like the actors as well. Well. That's also quite nice, because I have had other films that are of had to. You know, the direct was taken a sat and because, look, you know, can you re draw this entire character here, because initially we were trying to hire this one actor and it's they said no, so, but somebody else and we don't want them looking at this thinking even looks a wee bit like someone asn't then and things like. You know, could you make them way as old and another look just like that, but just make them look less old in case they see them and stuff. So, yeah, not be known, being able to not worry about I was actually kind of cool. If you got anything to know. Noine, you know pretty much. Yeah, it wasn't. You know, the constraints were. Was Actually quite fun. You know, it wasn't like it just said at first. You was a little off putting, you know. I said, I have to do these in this style. I don't drawing and but yeah, it wasn't. It wasn't. It wasn't that. It's actually quite funny. We did have a good laugh about it, I think the three of us. Who Do we realized it was just a whim of Oscars. Yeah, and just really quick like if there's like a weird story word artist, do the strawbard artist under them sort of have to like imitate their like their styled like to the best of their ability. No, no, no, and this it was basically so that the story boards look like one kind of kihisive continuity between. There was a continuity, it was a bad...

...one because it it wasn't about servicing the style I chose. It's about servicing in this particular is servicing the movie as a yeah, as a cohesive like you know how and it making it is easy to read as possible, because they would get on the set for everybody to see. It wasn't because you can't get away with squiggles and you know, you know, stick drawings, basically, if it's just for the director, because that's what we needs to see, just needs to see, you know, but these needs to be an easy way for people to you know, you know, affects cruise, every all the departments, easy way to see. Okay, we're in this world. We need, you know, we're going for this, and it's I think. I think the story board sometimes is that a lot of the people that are going to be seeing storyboards don't understand how to read drawings all the time, especially you know. I mean it's not part of the world. A lot of the crew overlap with and because I've seen storyboard artists, you know they'll be doing these massive and I actually sometimes after the massively rendered stuff, but it's been usually because of the effects that but I've seen storyboard artists do these like super shaded you can barely see what's happening. Things will be better. Let them in beautiful pieces of our MMM, as storyboards for somebody on set who's not used to looking at drawings and has to very quickly look at the end of the board stock, to a wall or a piece of board and say you're not going to be able to quickly look at that and go or Kay, that's what's going to help. And next and you've got you have to be a weird that you're doing artwork that has to be instantly or very quickly absorbed. Yeah, by everyone's a communication to so, as beautiful as the artwork could looks may be working against a point all that we but absolutely I think that note with that action stuff to what I find is it's Eily. Again, it's the function of the board. It like. I'll drop out backgrounds because what people need to read is the figures moving through space and you don't want a lot of background but on the Scott Pilgrim board is there's such carefully composed shots and you need to make sure there's space for the location of the graphics. And I do recall changing some of the composition to make sure you know, the editor wanted to adjusted because you wanted the Dingy Dong to come out of a certain part of the frame right, and you couldn't have things there because there was going to be a graphic there. And so again I think and I think that it really served to take use the books in the style is inspiration, because it really made the book tied the movie tying into the book as well, you know. So I think that there was in that case, the composition of the framing was really really important to whereas you might not have that. You know somebody running through the street of, you know, Miami, being chased by aliens. So ask her. Did you have a sequence that was particularly challenging or fun? The one that comes to mind, I mean we put the most work into Patel. That was definitely because that was our introductory instructions all this. That's the one I animated. That's the one where we introduced all the TD graphics in their full blown you know, style and but the thing I enjoyed the...

...most, and that's the one we did the test for as well. So we worked over PTEL three or four times in different formats. You know. We yeah, we knew that one inside and now and and when it came to the vfcs, that's that was one of the first trailer shots revealing that the new was the Kapou and he smacks it's Putil for most time. And Yeah, the iterations that that went through, because that was US learning that. This ties into another one of your questions about the style constricting us in a way. Yes, but also it there was no right way of doing it. So we were trying all all ways to get this crow and we you know that particular shot, that power shot, was there were so many layers of what went into that that one shot. It tare us all. It was like a road map. Just that one shot was like a road map of how to do the rest of it. But the seeing that I finally remember the most, and because of the genesis and how it went through, it was I was looking forward to when I first read the script was the audio demons fight, Nkinda Nargetwin ranken and the Etty, the cutting cutting, an Arguifer, and I was just so looking forward to designing that. That the Green Ideati and had a very, very clear idea of what it should be right from the work go that it should be a mix of the monster from the aid from fin and planet and the looney tunes bugs, Bunny Yetty. That was you remember that, Robin Danelle. It was just the big Oh yeah, read it's just a ball of red fur. It was on things and I heard boarded it, or I was. I was boarding that while we were into runs, I think, and it was challenging. But the I think the first thing that happened was V effects needed to get moving on a model for it, like V effect model for it. The dragons were kind of easier, but the vfx need and they stay sent through and it was kind of like a kick out my ass. They did it. I think they did on purpose. They sent through this design of what they think the order should be and I remember vividly being on something else, I because I was designing logos and, you know, rubble it tested this. There were so many graphics to go. I mean I was sitting beside they did best a graphic designer and we were, we were sharing duties on that because of so much to do. So I remember dropping everything I was doing then when this email came through. It the design of this demon because the no, no, no, no, and I immediately went to my drawing desk and start drawing out exactly what and sent them, you know, the character sheet of exactly how this should look, because it's something that, you know, they needed to get done early on. I wasn't ready to think about it yet or draw it down yet, but they pushed me to do it and it works and I'm glad they did as well, because we headed that off. I knew exactly what it needed to be and honestly, that's the wine of itiggest joys of the thing was getting a Leoney teens carriage on this screen like that. And it's the biggest, dumbest thing and and...

...it was so much fun to watch coming in front of her, you know, to what's sort of coming to a reality in front of our eyes. And and when we were doing all the vfx review sessions and it, you know, kept the stages of its creation with evolving in front of our eyes. And when it got to the final stages and they did so much great work on that and they will. They the vfx guys were loving doing it because they don't get to do that stuff normally and there and you could tell that all the love in the room, you know, from being this stuff and everybody wanted to make it the best. The kid and I remember me and I get just giggling in the front row of this review there watching these shots. Comes like and is that company? We get to do this? This is crazy. So that, I think, that's what I fondly remember most. It's that saying, because I just remember having this clear vision of exactly how that should look and that they did not disappoint. They absolutely went for it. So the emphasis on getting the just a real quick small question that the emphasis on getting the Matthew ptel fight right. Do you think that was? Because it's like the turning point of the movie where if you don't get exactly right, like people could like walk out, like you, like you know. I absolutely I think it's the it's the reveal essentially the same as it is in the books. We wanted it to be exactly how it is in the books. When you when you first read the book, you want. You turn the page and you think how many back you know that what they're doing missed and that's what we wanted. Get that and I think it's just Bam it, you know, just bombards you with all that imagery and there's all these new rules coming to play and then the Bollywood so songs, you know, the song and dance sequence starts and Scott's sister and Kendrick, she just goes what and that is that's the audience face. Agree, that's what the audience needed to see, that someone was reacting like what's going on? Say, yeah, it was huge, that sequence and in fact that we've got that flashback in there as well, which is basically animation that we did, like really simple animation based on branding, on May's artwork from the comics, you know, is absolutely you know, we this almost exactly. Well, he I'm not sure we used his actual artwork. I think we reproduced it, but it's pretty much exactly what he drew and we just animated it. You know. Yeah, I read the books this my brother loves the entire series and I finally got a chance to read the books and I was like shocked by how similar it was. Yeah, that like that first third. Yeah, and the first third is is almost page for page exactly, and and egg was very rigid on that. He and I think it's right. He just wanted to it's a good road map. Is a good way. And then, you know, when they split the when they got their separate ways, I mean Edgar and Michael retained the voice. It's feels like the saying. It doesn't feel wrong at all, you know. And yeah, it's very impressive what they did, really, really impressive. Trent. Was that an interview or is that an interview? Sure? What...

...that? We interviewed them, that is for sure. I would have more specifics to say about what happened in this episode, except I have not yet edited this portion. WHOA as of recording this really putting yourself under the microscope there. Yeah, I know, apologize for my unprofessionalism. I'll strive to do better in the future. Yeah, only editing the interviews like several days in advance. Asked. fucking asshole. I suck. I do part of Moon. I was just watching Jackass D I should have said this at the beginning of the episode. Yeah, I saw Jack Ass forever in the theaters. I heard you said that you were laughing your ass off. It's an excellent film. I only give it, I only give a three and a half stars, and then I was sitting in my bed last night and I was like, I'm an Asshole, I should give it at least four stars. How is Jack as D I was showing nate and Tamera, the friends off the show, and they had never seen any of the jackass films and they were very amused and so like watching it through and their new eyes. It was like taking candy from a baby, if that metaphor is this is a episode. Yeah, no, we don't need to be intelligible at the and at the end of the interviews. Yeah, thank you again to Robert McCallum, Yep, Danelle Davenport and Oscar right for their time. Thanks for coming. We're super excited for next week, which will be the end, the grand finale of the interview portion. And then the big guy comes in, the big the big guy. Yeah, parth brother Varage, and we're going to chat. When the show first started, rash said, if you ever do Scott Pilgrim, I'm coming on. Yeah, please make sure to give us five stars. Five on Apple Podcast, on spotify, give us a good rating on Apple podcasts leaves and just do it. Yeah, just, you know, follow our instagram. Follow our twitter. Where there or I'm on twitter. Yeah, listen, continue to listen to our Trent has like no enthusiasm. This is incredible. Continue to listen to our show. Yes, that's how please tell your friends. It really does help. Thank you, and more like it. Tune in next Sunday for part three of our Scott Pilgrim month, a whole month, well, whole month about Scott Pilgrim, versus versus the or sorry, part that trans getting kind of emotional on camera. Did I see a single tear? I don't. We'll talk about it, Bro all right. By guys, it's it's. It's the end of episode. By parth.

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