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Episode 78 · 7 months ago

SCOTT PILGRIM (2011) with Storyboard Artists PART 1

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent discuss Scott Pilgrim vs the World with storyboard artists Oscar Wright, Rob McCallum, and Danelle Davenport. They also are tired.

Wall. Trent parth, it's been a while. It's you're looking well. Thank you. It's been three weeks for the listeners, but how long has it been for us? Far Longer. We haven't been together since December thirty and it's, as of recording, February sixth. This is the conclusion of craft services first ever break. Yeah, but we're ready to go. We didn't do episodes for a month, as hopefully some of you noticed, but I'd say we're coming back with with a vengeance. Were and we're here and we've got some stuff. We're going to continue to be a movie podcast. Is that so? Yeah, and we'll. Trent. Should we just get it what we've been eating out of the way really quick? Yeah, I get that was our little welcome back, but yeah, part what have you been eating? Well, Trent, I had come back from a shoot. I woke up at six o'clock to shoot the sunrise on a farm for a documentary I'm doing for class YEP, and it was seven degrees outside. Oh, it's cool, and it was. That was pretty awesome. Yeah, and so, as you can imagine, me and friend of the show, Sophia Alexis, who also helped friend of the show but not yet on the show, so not really a friend of the show. Sarah Broughtman and friend of part and friend of the show, but not front of the show. Tom Merkel or are also very tired because they helped me this weekend, and so we heat it up a a pizza, a frozen pizza. Nice. What brand, if you don't mind my asking, Kirkland from Costco, Nice, there should be a term for people who like are our friends, like off the show, but they've never been on the show. You know this, friend of the show implies that they've been on the show. Yeah, so friends of the show and friends off the show. MMM Right, a little word play. I came from a location scout for a thing that you're also working on, and as part of that, George, friend off the show, had to buy US burgers because he made us wake up at am to drive to the woods. Was it good cheese borger? Yeah, that's all I have to say about that, but you're ready, we have a pretty tasty episode coming up. Speaking of the yeah, we should. We should probably just queue right into the intro. HMM. Yeah, no, since we're all like tired and cranky now, we should cut to a recording of us from like several months ago when we were all peppy and excited, young little film students, right, yeah, Yep, okay, cute the intra. Welcome back to craft services. Yeah, that's like just like that. Yeah, no, you listeners don't know, but usually after we say you, the Intro, treat and I have a little chat, but I just went straight in. Yeah, usually there's like several minutes of it. I wouldn't even say small talk, medium talk. You know, part of our close friends. We talked about things, but there was literally a nanosecond in between him saying will c the intro and then saying welcome back to the show. I think. Yeah, I think speed is the name of the game today. You know what I mean? If you can't, you've got it. You've got the need, need for speed. I do my favorite film. If if you can't tell by the deadness in our voice, like you know, it's funny because we took the month long break because we claim to be so tired, and now we're coming, we're here's the living proof, you know. Yeah, and but that's not a good sign, being that now, with this level of exhaustion, we have to move forward and continue to create the show as problem does. Don't don't mistake this tiredness for lack of enthusiasm for what's to come, because today's site juicy episode. Yeah, I'd say juicy is the right word that I'd said. This is sort of a big episode for us. This is a very big episode for us.

This is is this the first movie we had an interview so long we've broken up the interview for yeah, so I think the interview was, when hour and forty five minutes long? Yeah, and that was, I'd say, large. You do the fact that we were essentially interviewing three people at once. Part what are the names of the guests on the show the this week, on our show, the podcast? Well, Trent, thank you for asking, as I know the answer. First of all, we have Danielle Davenport, storyboard artist. Then we have rob McCallum, also storyboard artist, and third of all we have Oscar Wright, who was sort of the head storyboard artist and brother of the writer director at your right. Yeah, and they all wore super great and yes, because of how great they were, we just wanted to keep chatting, you know, and it went on for very, very long time and we thought that you, the list the humble listener at home doesn't want to listen to an episode that's essentially two hours long, because that's how on earth. And so we thought as this twofold logistically and to buy ourselves some time, because essentially we can just release the Scott Pilgrim this three parts of the interview and buy ourselves like three weeks with episodes and then at the end of February will release discussion with a special guest. And who will that special guests be? Let's save that Shell, we should. We really shoot. All right, it's my brother. As my brother, he's a big fat he's a big Scott Pilgrim fan, I'd say when we first started the show. Of course there's the question of Oh, if we do everyone has the movie that they're like, if you do that movie, you have to have me on and varage. That was VRAJE's pick. He loves that movie and I love this interview. This part one of three for the interview. It's super cool. They all kind of talk about how they got started into the industry and how they all started to get involved with Scott Pilgrim, and Oscar Wright especially was involved with the project for the longest. So he kind of has the most amount of detail and it's pretty cool. Well, let's shoot. Well, parth, I think we've I think we've we've said enough words for now. So how about we just cut? We cut to the interview. Duls. Yeah, fact, welcome to the beginning of Scott Pilgrim month. Yeah, whole a whole month worth Scott. It's a pretty good movie, so that I'm hat I guess we're going to talk about it for a month. MMM, hello, everybody, and welcome to our interview for Scott Pilgrim versus the world. With us we have three guests, Rob McCallum, Danille Davenport and Oscar right. Collectively, they've worked on pretty much every movie you've heard of, including it chapter one, Shun Chi and the legend of the ten rings and last night, and Soho. Thank you all for being here. Thank you, you're very welcome. NST BE SO, just to start off, this the most amount of guess we've ever had. So I guess whoever wants to answer first can answer first, and well, we'll go from there. If you guys could all talk about how you first got into the movie industry and specifically into the art department it wants to go first. How about we start with rob okay? I used to draw comics when I was art school, work for a comic called electric soup, alongside no very, very famous comic artist, frank quietly,...

...and then I also was making my own short films and storyboarding them myself. So when eventually I ended up drawing comics for a few years, I worked for two thousand EEDY, drew Wogo for DC, work for Stanlee for a couple of years on the excels or line, which never came out upon it was the last thing stinally did when it was at marvel. I didn't know that until about two weeks ago. So it's that it took a while. But because of my comics work I got to know all the editor of two thousand eighty and there was a film director and came to school wand's to make a whole mark movie. And the day after the Stanley Project got put on hold, after indefinite hold, after two years, I got a phone call from this director who'd got my name from the two thousand Ada that or as someone that may be able to draw storyboards for him. So I had I had storyboard samples, but I've own storyboards from own short films and I had come examples to sure I could draw properly, because the most storyboards were not very finecy that were just for me. And then I got a job drawing a cup like three. Three Hall Mark Movies are story boarded all in Scotland and in the fourth one, which I I didn't work on, actually be shooting in my hometown, just a bit two minutes down the street from me, which the irony there's I could I didn't need to travel if I'd worked on that. When that was like oh well, so that that and that started storyboard and things like but but you know, in Scotland or wasn't a huge amount going on. So I was doing like short films and then a story boarded the acid to two of the three short so short stories out of the acid house movie for Paul mcgreagan, who I've gone on to work with quite often over the years on various films. And then I moved to Canada and I was you see that no one's good the same story and main justn't start weaving on me, if this is bording. But I get set up with an interview some want. Someone I know was set me up with an interview with this guy's company and I traveled down all the way down town. Took hours to them drive and I saw this guy for like three minutes and it was in this room feel very miserable skill of people drawing like designs and renders and stuff like that for interior designs and things. And he came out and he said, you know, give me some kind of copy of that. That, that that that night and left. I was honestly there for three minutes and out the door and I was really kind of popped and I was like traveled all this way and I don't think I'd want to work there. And then traveling, I got a carbon a traveled back and we're passing by Cini Space Film Studios and I just said to the cab driver, let me out and I don't got some photocopies done at the local grocery store and I went in and I dropped off some samples to various productions that I could get into and there was the next day I got a phone call from the what ended up being called the recruit the Oppucino Colon fiddle film and I did some design work for them and then I did some story boards for them, and then it's a very small business, so your name starts getting the one and and then I did call for bulletproof monk, the show young fought movie that and I started off doing costume design for the but then the director came...

...in and said no, you're doing story boards now, and then that was me. I was just basically going from job to job ever since, and that's as it wasn't planned. It was she luck a lot of the time. Didnell? He'd like to know? Sure. Yeah, I think it's more than luck robbing. That's talent and some odd encouraged to go and just take the bowl with horns and deliver copies of your work, I think. I mean I I had started working in theater as a set designer and I am really was more of a dry painty kind of person, on early math rulers, architecture kind of person, and so I just wanted to segue into doing more drawing and painting and stuff like that, and so I similarly, I just put a bunch of samples together. I had worked on some films and some small things and done things for friends, but I hadn't really done a full on professional job as storyboarders, but I I dropped my I sent my work to an agency here in La and they called me in for an interview and they sent me out that day. As I was in the office interviewing, I called came in to do change it on someone else's boards and I had to go out that day and I didn't actually have like proper kids. I just had to scramble. I like look for pencils underneathing, like the mats of my car something, you know. I look at the glove box for drawing materials and and I showed up having prepared by did all my own research and teaching myself out of storyboard basically by watching films and learning film composition and and then I just had to do it and I learned on the job. Unfortunately, it was changed on someone else's work. So, you know, a lot of the format was provided and I just had to imitate somebody's style and I just managed to do that and from that point on I just kept working and so I ended up starting. Oftentimes in La we start off doing commercials and because that's just a voracious industry here and they need to need a lot of board artists. So that's sort of where I really learned to storyboard. And then and then it's interesting because I don't, at least here, I don't really find myself in the art department that often. I'm pretty much always been working at home and occasionally I'll be in the office. In the more recent years I have than in the office, but we're not. I haven't usually been in the art department. I've sort of been in the story department. So and recently I've worked with some animation directors who like to work in the animation style of storyboarding, which means they do a lot of boards. They've got to do do a lot of story editing and figure things out in the boarding process. And so I've learned to do I'm not an animator, but I've learned to do more animation through with boards and which I really, really like to do. It's funny. We were talking about the shining before we started and the first one of the first movies I worked on back in two thousand and one was letting teams back in action and I had never done animation. I had done tons of drawing, tons of like classical drawing human beings, animals, but not animation. I didn't know really how to design for at that time and I had to draw a bunch of bugs bunny scenes and he literally looked like I would say I'm not an animator, because my bugs money always loved like Jack Nichols into the shining you know this. So I really had to work hard to learn how to to move...

...form through space, and that's kind of recently what I've been doing a lot of great enough, I guess. Just O'll scar if you want to my a sort of winding road, but I'll keep it short. I study, I always did animation at home. Both me and my brother used to make sure films at home with Super A and I toyed with animation, but I loved making stuff, making props and things. So I studied mono making and I got into my first job outside college was a feature film. We would just, you know, labor, basically cheap labor, you know, straight out of college, mono making on a film, and mono making was what I did for two years until the company I was with went bankrupt and then aways like, you know, twenty one year olds out on the street, sort of thing. You know, and during the time I was looking for mono making work, my brother started this, started his sort of campaign to make his first film and I did the Tele seams for it, which was animation, because any asked me to, because I could do it basically in it. And you know, and on a very amateur level, but I you know, I taught myself animation and that was a learning curve just doing that. And this is back in the day when you're on drawing on sale, you're drawing on plastics. It's, you know, completely different from maywadays. So I was learning on the job doing that, as we all were. But that job got me loads of work for a sky actually a cable channel here, satellite channel I. That's Cable Channel Now, and and lots of little idents and stuff. Someone's someone saw egg as movie. Basically had an animation job. A little ident thought of me and I got loads of work doing animation idents and then I kind of got bored with that. You could tell in my work. I love animation to bits. I don't necessarily love doing it, not not being the lone guy doing it, because it was just me. It wasn't a team. I did work on some well one in particular when feature film as an animatist and effects animator, and that was that was an interesting exercise and interesting but, you know, window into that world. But really my career changed again. So went. I went from Onta maker to animator and then my brother needed so he started doing music videos and he needed and I when I was an animate to, I used to storyboard all my animations. That, you know, that was just part of the process and it was. It was all one thing. Now was much of the fun was planning it, not actually doing it. It was, you know what, planning the whole animation was great. Doing it was not great, not fun at all, and then editing it at the end was fun, you'd and I learned a lot in just all of those processes. And then my brother started doing music videos and I started boarding them and doing little bits of design and stuff and helping them out on those, and then he got shawn the dead and away and we started boarding and really that's there's been a lot of design stuff along the way, graphic design, but...

...mostly there's been boarding since then. That's that's really where my journey to boarding started and I found myself on that was all of our first feature, that would first feature for a lot of us at that stage. And I found myself in the art department and the production designer who always uses markets, Ryland, fantastic guy and really fantastic production designer, and he, I think he saw the use how useful I can be in the art department. So I wasn't scored away in a little room as on some films storyboard is are squared away somewhere and you know you don't get to see the other departments. But he he wanted me in, you know, on the team, in the department and it's been that way of it since and it's really helpful, very helpful. It's being art department doing boards selpful for everybody, I think, because everything you know, you get a lot of. You can see, you know, you just see how things are progressing along and you can you can all help each other, so it's said, which isn't always the case, but it's on those particular jobs. So that's how I found myself in the art department mostly. So jumping ahead, how did everyone get involved with Scott Pilgrim and did any of you have an established relationship with the material? Because it was like coming out concurrently. I think I did the first book. When I hailed it it was coming to tone just of interest because some the someone that ended up working on a the taught me that was coming the give up briefs and rBS or sort of that, and it just so and it like when and she probably be thought that sounds interesting. But then, yeah, but I really like the comic. And how did I get involved? I had met Admit Edgar and Simon Peg and I was working on land of the dead. They came out to be Carnival zombies. Gotten that. Yeah, and there was an artist that I know, Jim Murray, who did some artwork for spaced for Simon pegg's character as a comic artist, and I think it was Jim Buddy that the yes. Yeah, so just purely because it was like all we know the same person, I wanted to just see how I to go. And then I was in my office drawing on land of the dead and Edgard and Simon turned up his zombies at my door and how do we chart? And Yeah, so chatted each other. We about over the next couple of days where we were filming. I was so exhausted on that movie. It was a lot boarded almost everything on it. So then when I heard the recoming, actually Bomptentedgar on the stairs when he was must just have been here scouting and just to we catch up and a hello. And then I think I came in for a interview from doing concept are and I didn't get it, but I did spend probably the next two and a half hours chatting to Osk her and just kind of, you know, shouldn't a reason. Ever, had a nice time. And then I got a call not long after seeing the Oscar was kind of needing some someone to help you that understood story boards on the film, and and that was me and I started and I started off doing, I think it was just kind of helping edit stuff and just because the actual nuts and bulks of what pagination and all that stuff and story boards as as then foreign world to somebody...

...that's not used to it. You know, it's a it can be an absolute nightmare. Yeah, so totally tortally and I saw, and this was a lot of these, a lot of the boards were there. Were the ended up digital, but they were drawing analog. I think I think I ended up using you, you using the Sinte I had my syntique that ended up thinking this is a better idea to do on this because in a can edit what we're doing it. Yeah, but beside time I'd seen a Sintiqun action. There was a tiny one as well, and ironically enough, I'm back to attain any screen and do almost stuff and ipid prone. No, it's a same size a screen, but like and the probably about a sixth of the weight. Yeah, so that was an Amazon it for a good few months. Was I was trying to remember how long I was on it for, but seasons they'd change. So when from being freezing called it safe, to being quite nice. So it's Probab I think it was a free or four one. Someone design it for that long. I don't know what may have been longer. I really can't remember because it was that long ago. It was. Yeah, I mean it was. I mean I was on it for three years. Yeah, in Toronto. Good run we were. We were in Toronto for eight months where it should have been six. Over ran. Yeah, maybe there was a time I thought you were in it and too, because, yeah, it's difficult putting it all together. I remember that I was I moved up stairs to work on resident evil after life. You were still doing sort of member. You popped up to see how Lord to me, yeah, I mean here, don't reach chart some yes, it makes it so, because so maybe the boarding, the boarding was what we were boarding late into it, but the boards became sort of re edited regurgitations of things and it was, you know, hatching stuff together because there was a lot. There was a few rewrites on the on the go in, you know. I mean we'll get into that later, but yeah, there was there work. There were always boards to do, even though I had designed stuff to do as well. I balanced that and as that's why you, you came along pacedy have to out a great tail, because I ended up being it was because I started off doing that and then, I think, basically ended up going bolts, which was nice. I got to do some of the Castle Wilma, so you couldn't. So you've got the opening. Its basically just kind of divisions and stuff that just needed done because Oscar was, you know, very busy with a lot of other stuff as well. So it was it was kind of Nice actually, because usually it's just me, I know, the game kind of just be me on as on a film doing everything myself, and then it was like, you know that that's just entirely my disponsibility here. I'll get to just, you know, come along for the raid, you, but it was it's always bad to have a team alway. Yeah, sure, that's true. Yeah, I you know, I'm actually had I actually had them with me. I had all I have the four books that had been accomlished and we worked your books, I mean one a way. I don't know why I don't have a number two, but I know I had to go back into my mail and hard drive to see when I worked on it and I started. I think we talked about this in and Oscar confirmed it was prior to the movie getting Greenland. I worked on from Mayo eight through September hundred and eight and they went they had just left for Toronto or something like that, and so I was just doing the the boards prior to getting a greement or something like that. I think. Yeah, I was just thinking about this today. When we first met, had you worked on it already, because...

I suddenly remember we met in a I and I remember seeing examples, if you are rather work, being impressed with it, and but had you they suddenly occurred to me that had had. Do you not start working on it? That I was when I when I met you, I had I was just darting as the first time I knew anything about it and I honestly didn't know anything about the comic or anything, and I saw when I promptly went got the books and read them and they were really fun. And Yeah, and then so I just I think I did. I went back and I looked through my files and I did like I just have sort of memories of the bits that I really love that stick aust me. Like you, I did that opening sequence with the Scott killed him coming out of the guitar and the Love Cloud and writing on the bucks, and like when he first meets Ramona and their first kiss and when he jumps out the window behind Karen Kulkin, which I love. So yeah, they were moment than like Leno. Another one that always sticks in my mind is when NIC's Chow is docking it as she needs her hand on the print on the window. You know, it did like the first, the first you know, get to battle the bands, the first, you know, the first, the first competition or first confrontation with Matthew Patell no, not the fight. I think the only fight thing that I worked on was again the castle loona bit. Okay, skateboarding, because that stuff. I remember Edgar showing me the stuff that was being worked out in stunts with with Michael Sarah and I think he showed me footage from the stunt choreography with Michael Sarah and the matthe Pizza Hotel character while we're in the middle of that. So, like oftentimes with these movies, they're not relying on my mad martial arts skills to figure out scenes, which I don't have, and so it's really I don't like, I'll do a pass on fight scenes, but that's really goes to the stunt department really quickly, I think, at least from but you'd better. You never sadly, you never joined us in Toronto. You would remote when he yeah, yeah, yeah, and we even he actually met once properly and it was an alay. Wasn't that that first time? Yes, because then we've talked a lot of sense. You know, we've done a lot, because we weren't yes, but directly with Edgar on that, and I think it was telling you yesterdays after they were on. It's some press junket, and so he would come in and out of town and yeah, and or I'd sends to far or we correspond every email and things like bad. I can, I can start this story earlier than that, though. His first time I came into I'd heard. I'd heard that there was a project called Scott Program that it was being approached to do, and I but I did. That is as much as I knew until the first time I knew anything about a new properly. What it was was the existing books, which I think there was only three at that point, were delivered to me without any, you know, an explanation whatsoever by, I think that it was by the production coming mark pat productions. I think they sent them and it wasn't it good is...

...production company in the UK, and it's like, Oh, I guess I'm working on Scott Pilgrim then and then I started reading them and if the first one especially, I kind of got the idea. I thought, I see why they've gone to ago. This is kind of a twenty something. It's got a spaced vibe, business lackers sort of thing. And then it got to the end of the book and it's the Pithelfi and my eyes just that got wider and wider and as we're going to get to do this, you know, this is Great Fire Shit, this is amazing and I I'm and I was, I was really excited about what we could do. You know, it was very much in my wheelhouse, the kind of I'm an anime fan and well, certain anime, but I was definitely it was definitely, you know, the first animation on my over store was Akira and, like a lot of people in in the UK and the way in the Western world, a Kira was the first one that was released, you know, properly on cinemas, and me and they were there and basically in Bristol watching it and I think it was an animation festival and it bursts away. So I've been a fan since then, if that could particular style, and there's been a few things along the way that really piqued my interest. But Games have as well. I had a gaming background. So then me and I gat had a first into it, like interview, like our first meeting about it, and we was it was interesting. He was sort of tensively, sort of, you know, trying to see what I thought of it and it was. It was so great because we suddenly got, we both got really excited because I said I can't see it, that want to do a handmade kind of look to it, like it should be. Should have this sort of handmade qualities, like a reprie, because there's something about those comics, the first ones especially, where they're quite it's quite rushed artwork, but there's an innocence in and energy about it and I wanted to see if that could be captured. And aggar got so excited because it was on exactly same page. That's exactly what he wanted to do. So we, I've viverly remember us like getting a bit Giddy, like we're realizing we were both wanted this, this thing to be this way. And and then, yeah, the journey started really there and it was a full year, I think, of boarding and design work, meeting, you know, doing tests, you know, live action test, doing vfx test. Before we got to Toronto there was a foot week putting on it for a full year and Eg was doing other staff, you know, it was other stuff going on. But my my fulltime job was Scott Program and there was a lot of work to do. There was a lot because there was a yet to be green lit. So it was all prepped to get the green light and they go wanted to go and armed with as many boards of all the action sequences as possible. And there was a very different ending. As very you know, there was not not the ending that was really shot. There was a different action piece. There's different final fight and all of this to go back to how it tied up with the original material, the original book. Edgar had met up with Brian a long time prior to this and I think he'd only had one book out, maybe by then, perhaps two, and he gave an outline of his story to Edgar and Mike End up beat Michael Picor, who co...

...wrote it. And Yeah, there was an outline of how brianding a man he was going to tell the story and when. And I'm sure you guys know with the fir the first that the first third of the film, I would say, is pretty much identical to the books and then they split and that's essentially how many books were written and branding a manny was very heavily involved. We went him, ors EGGAR would go to him all the time. I mind him for in from as well, and he was brilliantly generous with us. He was a fantastic person to work with. Anna, we wrote what we was here around when you were there. Yeah, it was, it was so it was our own to he was he came into he came in a lot. We got recent work on the film as well, much much to his agents and annoyance, I think, but we we got him to do some actual artwork that appears in the movie. Loved his head, very cenerius with his toy. They here what they had plans in the newspeople store. There was so many we details that there's so funny. Bore. The head waits and the Toronto Star Wars. I'm called because it wasn't make the still to say that was but it. But yeah, so the books and the film going a separate ways and Brian absolutely wanted that to happen. He wanted to do his own thing, you know, he wants to tell his own story. And yeah, it's so. But by the time I'd got to Toronto and it's still I think I'm right in saying it still hadn't probably been green lea yet. It was definitely we were, you know, it was that sort of negotiation period about budgets and things, I think. But we were all set up in Toronto and we will ready to go. And even though a lot of boards have been done, there was a lot to design as well. There was a lot of doing reframe with the fight coordination. We sort of we had the you know, amazing opportunities to work with the fight, the stunt team, and you know, I was so happy to be able to work with those guys and informed all of our you know, we all in front. We made as much as much a team effort as we possibly could and I think it really benefits and we had a great v X team on the other side of it. That was the third year of me on Scott Pilgrim. was just the post production, because there was an awful lot of work to do after that, after we'd finished shooting. There was, yeah, almost the entire years worth of work just on to the animation, which I've mostly designed myself, but I needed a team. So there was a team that was built up around me of animators and we've got that through and amazing work from those guys who really helped me out, because I definitely needed have on that. And but that that was wholee crisis in itself is to d department alongside of the Effects Department, and I'm making that work. Welcome back. Now it's the interview. Yep, now...

...it's the end of the episode. The interview is over, and I hope you, hope, hope, you hope you enjoyed it. Just as you guys heard earlier, I have yet again, without any small talk, gotten straight to the end of the episode and here we are. Well, we hope you liked the episode. And Yeah, this is usually the part of the episode we talked about the next episode. Yeah, and what comes next is part two, because we definitely stopped. I'm sure parth found a logical conclusion. Yeah, I tried my best, like a place that this interview ended. And so then, if you listen to this interview you want to continue, wait seven days till next Sunday. It's the day where we release episodes, Church Day, day, Lord and so the yet, so next Sunday and then the subsequent to Sundays there will be no episodes about Scott pilgrim versus the world. We hope you like this episode. We hope you can rate US five stars on spotify and Apple pod cast. Yeah, I have us. If you guys are if you update spotify, then you'll be able to give us stars, and we would like you to do that and we think we deserve it, you know, and on Apple, apple podcast, you write US little review. That'd be nice. It like helps part and I are trying to make enough money to quit our day jobs, and so we need we need to monetize. So tell your friends, help the show, help us. Yep, how we're gonna it's only a matter of time until we sell out and the they're starts. We have to start filling out time. So enjoy, enjoy the commercial free radio while it lasts. All right. Well, I think we're we're out, we're tapped out. I think I have a splitting headache. But we're really excited about the next month. Don't get US wrong, guys. Part two, it's going to be better than ever. Part are you going to be? Are you going to be amped for next week to compensate for this current level of drab? So amped? What what all right by listeners.

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