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Episode 86 · 8 months ago

OSCAR WINNER MOLLYE ASHER Interview

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent interview Mollye Asher, the Academy Award Winning independent film producer behind Nomadland, Swallow, and Songs my Brother Taught Me. They also hype up the next episode.

We are tonight's entertainment. You can't handle the truth. The Fire Risals, pizza time. You're a wizard, Harry. So we you know. You think that's where you're breathing approving. I will have friends through the suits. So, Trent, so part nice to see you. You're looking well. You're looking well, also, well, thank you. Today is a notable occasion. Do you know why? Why is that? Look at me. Oh, something. It's something we've been talking about for a long, long time. Well, because you see, folks, Trent and I've been talking for probably like half an hour now, so I was already desensitized to this. But when we got into the call, you were shocked. I was mesmerized. Stephen, you're rendered speechless. Come to C D say everyone, everyone, try to shirtless. Yeah, well, we've been talking for a while about doing the shirtless pod. We're like everyone like in an interview and a discussion. Everyone, boy, girl, whomever, is shirtless, and we called the shirtless pod and I always thought that I would be a fun idea. Parth is less excited, but I was shirtless and we were just doing like a little five, ten minute or boarding and I thought why needlessly put on the shirt because I wanted to entice part, but he does. He just gave he gave me a little tease, but he didn't want to be shirtless for the full duration of the show. I'm sorry everyone. I'll try in the future to be better. He's also stated his opposition to getting our interview. He's to take their shirts off. Yeah, I know I'm in the minority, but I think that might be unprofessional. It's just it's not a visual medium like the listeners. Went't know, but it would just like be for us. Trent, what have you been eating? Haven't eaten since breakfast. But but breakfast was bread that friend of the show front off the show, Tamera housemate, made and wow, she's such a little chef. The back story of the bread is that someone in her life died and she recently went to the wake and she baked and she baked two loaves of bread in hopes of giving one of them, the more appealing one, to the morning family, and both of them didn't rise and so they were like bread Frisbees, and so she said that I could eat some, so I had it for breakfast, alongside some eggs and a smoothie. I mean I'm sorry that that person died. It was a I'll bet some food out of it. It was in a bicycle accident. Oh, how unfortunate. It's a good thing she doesn't listen to the podcast, because then she doesn't have to hear me laughing about this person that she knew dying from a bicycle accident. Not, not a motorcycle, like a like a bike with with wheels. Wow, what about you? What have you been eating? I had Tofu with Rice for dinner. It was like a little thing and a salad. It was delicious. I had a good time eating it. Good for you. Well, we have, you know, like football games where they like flip a coin and at the beginning of the game. We have to do something similar to that. Oh, she did. Should we do this now, or should we know? Let's leave them in suspense. Let's leave in suspense, let's do the intra music and then we'll yeah, let's Gus. Second on the other hand, on the other side parthose I'll see on the other side, buddy. All Right, I'm gonna miss you that through them, through the magic of editing. That'll just be being just beasifulit.

Second Q, The intro welcome back to craft services, where we talk about the movies. Each week. We talked about a film and hopefully have a crewmember o that film to talk with us about their experience working on the Chue. And today, Trent, we have an episode. We had sod as of the listeners clicking on this episode. They know what we're about to listen to, right, am I wrong? But and correct me again if correct me again. But we do not know what they're about to listen to. Am I wrong? Know our face is about to be determined by a president, George Washington. So, for the listeners, we have right now to interviews stashed ready to go out in our back one, but we don't know which one we want to do and we need to record an intro for one of them. And we thought, what, why not record an intro for both of them and neither exactly Simultane at the same time? And so we thought, hey, wouldn't it be a fun little thing if we flipped a coin on air and based on the basis of that coin flip, we would then know what everywhere recording an intro for doing. Yeah, so try. Do you want to lay out our two options? So option number one would be interview with so option number one, which will sign to the head side of the coin, would be interview with the Matrix resurrections editor, Joseph Jet Sally. That interviews pretty dope. I liked it and recorded the day after the film premier. Yeah, we have yet to release until like four months afterwards. He also worked on speed RAC or. He has an action figure made of him. Yes, because he was in Star Wars, because he was an editor on assistant editor, assistant editor on Star Wars, and so he got to be an extra. And the big battle sequence in star wars episode two, attack younosis. Yeah, the one with all the monsters. We're JENGO FETT GETS to capitated part. What do you think when young Bubba Fett picks up the head like the helmet? That like that decity? The head is still in the helmet. The head is still in the helmet. Shouldn't it pop out? That would have happened, except George Lucas cut right at the moment was starting to slip out. Frankly, this is the option I'm hoping for because they would lead to a discussion the following week of the Matrix as directions, which is a movie I have not yet viewed in completion, but I have formulated some very strong opinions about it. Yeah, based on seeing it, the first half of it in the movie theater and then being in such physical pain that I left to go to go watch liquors pizza again, which is an opinion according to parth. But what's option to what's the tail side of the coin? The tail side of the coin is an interview we did with my former professor, Molly Asher. She was the producer for nomad land and is, as such, is an Oscar winner and she talked with us about producing. has some cool stories about that, what she looks for in projects and, you know, talks about what it was like winning the Oscar, which happened not so long ago. So the producer like gets their own Oscar trophy. Like she probably has a physical Oscar. She...

...does. She showed us in class. She actually two days after the Oscars. She was our last day of class and she showed it to everyone and answered everyone's questions about it. Did she let you hold it? What was on? Zoom, because online, but still that's pretty cool. Yeah, it's pretty awesome. Part. Do you think you'll ever win an Oscar. Definitely. Yeah, wow, confidence, not yet, like he's wand that it's not that weird, it's not that hard. Okay, cool. On to the next section of the show. This is our first coin flip ever. Yes, not like throughout our whole lives, but I mean like with this, with the stakes, like this, with these stakes. We've flipped a coin during the best director matchup. Oh for what? Who could draft first? No, because I was between David fincher and Christopher Nolan at the end, and I think David fincher one. I think back on that and that I died on the David fincher hell, and as much as I like him, I think guy was I wasn't being objective in saying that Christopher Nolan wasn't more prolific than him. HMM, interesting. So part is right again. Interesting. Onto the coin flip. I'm older now, I have perspective. Okay, so, just for reference, the tail side is for the State of North Carolina and it was issued in two thousand and fifteen. Here we go. So I'm going to do a flip and then a catch and then a flip over under the back of my opposite hand. Okay, sort of the same. Heads is matrix tails is Molly Ashure, who was the producer no man land, but we also did a no medland episode already, so this wouldn't lead to us doing a no medland episode now. It was kind of just be a one off and then the following week would be the Matrix interview. So if your hankering for them, that Matrix interview, it's kind of worry. It's coming out. Yep, okay, here you go. Ready, I'm waiting. Should we? Should I put a sound effect? I sound effect? Yeah, okay, make it sound cool. Okay, wait, whoa. How about you flip the coin? Like you flip the coin? Put It, put it on your the top of your hand, and then I'll do like a little drum sound effect and then you'll okay, all right, I'm ready. Okay, here it is, the final result about to be uncovered. Three, two, one, you want to guess? Parth is the heads. It steals. So it's Molly Ashure, it is. We must honor the coin. The coin Gods have spoken. Wow, that I was pretty intense. Trent, I know there was. Before. I did like a practice one and I would have played it, but a landed on my belly and then I thought to pick it up off. That would be cheating, and so now I can only think what that flip would have been. Nothing good. You know, it was a fifty. We had a fifty shop. The State of North Carolina Rin Supreme. But yeah, I guess here's our molly. Ask Your interview. Yeah, she was super nice to us, which is pretty cool considering her status in the industry. In an Oscar winner, but enjoy this interview. Hello everybody, and welcome to interview with Molly Asher. She's an independent film producer behind such films as songs, my brother taught me, the rider and swallow. She's won the Academy Award for Best Picture with the film no bad land and, more importantly, she was my professor when she won it. Thank you so much for being with us here today. Thanks for having me so like. Just to start off, what would you say your relationship with films were when you were at a young age? I wasn't very much of a movie moviegoer. I was more in the performing arts. I'm so I don't know...

...if I really I didn't have really start to have a relationship with movies until I got older and I think you went to Undergrad for musical theater, but then and you wanted to be an actress, and then that didn't yeah, and out. It's like what happened there? Yeah, I mean I use I was a singer and a dancer growing up and always imagined that I wanted to be on Broadway, and so so I went to school for that and then realized that I didn't actually like it, but I liked straight acting, and so I pursued that, but was mainly a waitress for a long time and feeling very like I had no real control over my life, you know, going to auditions and everything's in somebody else's hands. So I made it a short film with some friends and then discovered that I liked putting it all together and then went to film school. So did you? You went to Nyu for graduate school, and was it for film, and if so, what was what was that experience like? It was wonderful, it was. It was truly life changing. You know. I went because I wanted to not only learn filmmaking, but I wanted to find my people, basically, like the people that I would then work with, and you know, it was a really wonderful experience. Where I got it, a chance to learn every aspect of filmmaking and and really felt free to make mistakes and discover yeah, I I was. It was truly a special time. So obviously you ended up moving into producing and sort of what was it about it that you that attracted you to that kind of a role in filmmaking? I think a couple of things. I'm when I really believe in someone, I want I amplify, amplified their voices, their stories, and there's also a part of me that when somebody thinks they can't do something, or if I'm told, know that I love to prove people wrong. So so, which I guess is probably why I'm that in indie filmmaking. With that being said, can you explain the basic duties and exactly what a producer does? Yeah, well, my course at redgers is what it was. It fourteen classes. In order to answer that question. If you go to Ruckers, you should take that class. So I kind of look at a producer's being the the the force behind a film or, you know, TV series or whatever, kind of the person who understands what the vision is for the for the director, and is doing everything possible to lay a groundwork, find the right people keep that vision true from beginning to end. So I come on two projects early in script stage, some times even earlier when it's just an idea, and work with with the brighter I often work rightter directors and then and then, you know, I'm in it every phase, so from the working with the writer on the script to getting the talent together, the financing, finding the best department heads and then, you know, overseeing the production and then it's strategy for how to get it out into the world. So obviously I feel like part of the predatorial role is kind of, like you're saying, like jump starting these projects, and part of that is probably attracting investors. Like is that is skill that you feel like you kind of always had of being able to like pitch projects and things, or is that something you've had to sort of acquire over time? I definitely think it's something that, you know, takes some learning and some practice. You know, I didn't what but...

I think at the same time there is some some kind of innate ability to get people excited about a project, you know, and you do the same thing when you're trying to find the right crew members. You know, the right DP or whatever, knowing how to how to talk about the project and what's going to get that person excited. But but yeah, it's over time, you know, trying, trying to understand what it is that an investor might be looking for and how best to do angle your pitch to their their needs. So, when looking for a project, is there any specific like qualities in a in the director, that you are looking for, like when you want, when you're considering getting involved with them? One of the important things, I think is is identifying if they're if they're collaborative, like if you know, if I'm, if I'm giving thoughts on the script that I've read, like how do they take those notes? Is it's something? Does it? Does it feel like they're listening and engaged with it or shut off from it? I also really love filmmakers who are really driven, like the kind of thing of like, whether you work on this or not, I'm making this movie happen. You know, I find that incredibly important. You know, another thing I look for is someone who has a strong vision and who can articulate it. Is Script at it's a big part of the job, like in an early stage. Yes, definitely. Yeah, you've worked a bunch with chloe jaw, who I believe you met at Nyu. What's that process between the two of you like? I mean, as I understand it, she has a very specific process that's not necessarily like how normal movies normally can hr movies normally get made. So, from a producer standpoint, what's that relationship with her like for you? Yeah, it is different. You know, it came out of necessity, but her, she is, her writing comes a lot from places that she goes and people that she meets. So and it's so a lot of ways like the writing process is in some ways also like the prep of the movie, and so I might either am going out with her scouting that she's she's putting together the story or finding people to connect her to. So it's a very it's like an active sort of like. It's like it's like a physically active kind of development, whereas you know, working with a filmmaker that is in a more traditional sense, it's it's sitting down with the script. So you worked on, I believe, three films with Chloe show songs. My brother taught me the rider and no medland. Which one? They ask her and you went to the Academy Awards. That's so, can you? Could you tell us about that? Yeah, it was quite something. God, I don't even know where to begin. I mean it was obviously a different version than ever before because of covid but I really I don't know where to begin. It was it. Would you see anything as people I did. And then, you know, I Trent Resner was there and I am a huge, huge fan of him and I was as a child and I actually there's still a picture of him hanging up in my my bedroom at home, and so I was like, I have to go and say for nine inch nails reasons, or for his more like his recent scoring, like that's why I'm in love with rum wrestler. Yeah, I love his scoring, of course, but yes, it was nine inch nails. So I went up to him and was like, I was just I was so nervous too, and I realized, I thought was talking to him, that I was like instinctually taking off my mask, which you know, and I was like, Oh my God, I'm sorry, but I did. I he didn't know who I was or anything. I was like I produced, I produced no Madland, and like you know...

...what I did, and by the way, I've been in love with you since I was a child. Exactly. Yeah, I saw a picture of you and Frances mcdorman and Kloise out on the right carpet and I was like that's awesome. So, like, talking about the Oscars, we were kind of wondering, like award circuit seemed like a weird thing because like obviously like the movies done. And so what's that process like where you're you have a finished film and you want to take it too, you know, an awards type thing? What's that process like for you? How involved do you have to be on that? Well, this was a different experience because we were working because it was they were studio was, you know, angling it for for the Oscars and like, you know, versus, you know, with other films, like we go to awards ceremonies, Spirit awards or Gotham's, but there hasn't been as much of it. There wasn't campaigns, you know right. So we were, as producers, involved, pretty involved, and the studio would kind of choose each one of us for different kind of specialties, you know. So like, for example, I I did an interview with backstage because I was a part of a lot of the casting. So yeah, it's a lot of also repeating, repeating the same answers, because the same questions are asked over and over and I kept kidding with my husband that like he could just sit in for me and answer all the questions because he's been hearing me on zoom. So I believe songs my brother taught me. went to Sun Dance. And when you bring a movie, like a smaller indie movie, to Sun Dance, are you like shopping it around and trying to get it bought? Yeah, the intention is to get it bought. So you you bring on a publicist and you bring on a sales agent and they kind of work accordance with one another and so, like, you know, the hope is always that your movie premieres and you know there's a bidding war and you stay up all night and then. But that didn't happen with songs. But like as as the producer, like, is your work done or are you awesome there are are you? Are you like a representative, like out there with the clipboard, like trying to get people to buyer movie? Know the sales agent is doing that, but then you, you're involved in the negotiation of the price of the sale. But the yeah, I mean some producers, especially nowadays, will take on sales agent duties, but but really it's it's a specialty, you know. So the people who are selling the film have relationships with the distributors. You've also produced a bunch of shorts and we were wondering how different the job is producing a feature film versus a short film and kind of what the objectives, what the differing objectives with the two are. Yeah, I remember when I was doing my first film, feature, I was thinking like okay, well, this is just going to be like I'm producing for shorts in a row, and so much of it really is very much the same, like the process of getting it off the ground and making it and finishing it and but I think a big something that was a big difference was was really was raising the financing because, you know, when we were in school, our classmates, we're working on the projects for free, you know, like so we had equipment from school. So that was the biggest hurdle, I think, going from shorts to features. And then also, I guessed, you know, the aim of what you wanting to sell the film. Of course there are people who, you know, sell their shorts and and but when I was in school it wasn't as common. So I'm so really it was a matter of just like...

...helping to get the film at a festival that then, you know, to be able to launch the filmmaker's career. Obviously you're still working like within an independent sphere, so it's not like you're working necessarily with like marvel level budgets, but, like you've definitely the budgets have increased a bit. How much does that change it on your end, or is it kind of just like it's just you have to figure it out no matter what? Well, it makes it a lot easier because you don't have to do every single job. The bigger budget you have, the more you can really sort of yeah, you can. You could put a lot more into being able to be standing by the Monitor, you know, and like really being there for the filmmaker. So that's that's the biggest difference, is that you just have a have a larger team that you can rely on. So obviously you were the producer on nomadland and just in general and on this project in particular, like were you driving across the country during the filming like with the whole gang. HMM. Oh Yeah, we talked to Mary Cara again a little bit during our nomadland episode, but yeah, she described that it was a real cohort environment and that you were like you're you're on the road making a movie for for for serious. Yeah, it was fun and, you know, like every movie, I feel like, you know, you become a family, but I think especially if you're out of out of town on jobs, because you really everybody that you're with on the shoot is like who you're living with too, you know. So I think and we were really conscious of providing that kind of atmosphere on no myd land because it was a longer shoot and so, like we are, production office that we would set up at each hotel or motel was also a place where people could gather and play games and, you know, have a beer after work. Obviously, nomadland is probably, at least recently, the most widely known or claimed thing that you worked on, but we were wondering if there's another movie that you've worked on that you think maybe not like overlooked as maybe the wrong word, but just like a movie you wish like, Ah Shit, I did good work on that movie. People should know about that. Yeah, I mean like the wall. I really wish that people like knew more about songs, for brothers taught me. But yeah, I'd say probably, like she's lost control and Fort Tilden. The for Tilden was the filmmakers then that went on to make search party. Yeah, the and it didn't really have as big as a life as I wished it had. It won grand jury prize at South by and then was picked up by o'ryan, but it didn't really yeah, it didn't make us much of an impact of that. Wish that it could have. Just, you know, as far as it's reach. And same thing with she's lost control. It's a really special film that you can really see a very distinctive filmmaker who then went not like you most recently did the third season. I think it was of girlfriend experience wrote it and Steven Soderberg show. MMM. Yeah, yeah, Nice. I watched the trailer for swallow, which I believe got bought. It was IFC. HMM, yeah, that that that that looked. That looks like a success. Yeah, I was really happy with with that. That how that film did and it actually, I think it in some way benefited a little bit from the pandemic because we came out in theaters on March ninth. Two Thousand and twenty was march ninth, and then in New York in La and then the next week it was supposed to open wider, but then that next week was when everyone went into lockdown. But because the way that I have see works were it's day and date, which means that it's in theaters and and available online the same day, you know, started the pandemic. People were looking for things to watch and I think that it's it definitely overperformed. What what was estimated for that? So, like over the course of your career, what would you say that? The thing is that you've gotten more, you've had the most. You've gotten much better at that particular thing. Like what would you say is the scale that you've been able to cultivate? They've most the mostest part. That...

...was a good question. I know. I think. I think giving notes, because it's something that is well first of all, like, I think if first, like they was, it was gaining confidence that it was that that I could give notes, you know, on the script, in the edit and but also finding the way to do it and every single. Every filmmaker is different in how they here notes is different, and so being able to it to adjust how how I'm speaking about a project, but also even just like being able to read a script and and have an idea of what what's working or not working and how to help steer the writer in a direction to improve. I've always wondered about notes because I feel like you always hear about either studio notes or like investor notes or whatever, and I'm like, is there like a formal process for those, or is it just like you send like a Google doc with a bunch of bullet points on it? Hmm? Or is it just written script notes for the way that I do it? And I'm there's not. I don't there's not like really a you know, a specific way that at least maybe there is in like TV world or something. I don't know, but I what I do is I write very detailed notes. I suppell it's when I start out, though. It's a larger kind of way of looking at and I guess what I should say is I write the notes in an email first and then send it to the writers so they can like process it, think about it and we send then we set up the time to go over to the notes over the phone or in person or whatever. And and I guess I do bullet points. I do do pull bullet points when I'm making the notes. Have you ever had to without naming any names, obviously, but like, have you ever had to act as like an intermediary between like say, someone's putting up money and they have a note and you're like that's a dumb note. Yes, like that. Yes, and like how do you handle that kind of a situation, because I'm obviously, HMM, there's like a power happen either money, but they have bad ideas. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, I've definitely been in a situation like that. Well, it was understood, though, that we were that their notes weren't contingent on them, like they had already decided they're going to work on the project will funding. Yeah, yeah, and so well, like I will take the notes from the investor, not have the investor give them to the filmmaker, so that I can sort of filter, filter, yes, and maybe sometimes reward it, possibly in a way that might be more like easier to grasp or yeah, productive. So we'll ask you what you're working on now, but is there any sort of potential future projects, or at least type or genre of movie that you haven't had the chance to produce that you are that you're hoping comes across your path? But there's like a dream type where it's like God, I'd love to do a thing like that. MMM, without spoiling anything that might be works. Like I would have loved to have produced Black Swan. I love that movie. I really like I like thrillers and I like things that are a little bit sometimes outside of reality. You know, I like when those when that merges. I just watch black swan last month, really good movie. I just watched it again recently too. Yeah, yeah, everyone is just watching movies they like and they're like, I want to make this, I want to make my own version of this, but that's enough. That's a different enough to not get copyright black span to point out. Yeah, Trent said this, but what are you working on now or for releasing now that you can talk about? Well, I have a film coming out in February called catch, the fair one. It's also with IFC. A trailer recently came out for that and so excited to see how audiences will react to that one. The the actress in it got nominated for Spirit Award for best female...

...lead, which was incredible. It's our first her first acting job ever. She wasn't an actor, she's a she's a boxer, and so I'm so excited to not only see, you know, how audiences are going to react to this film, but also see what it might do for her her career. So that's coming up. And then I have some projects that I'm packaging. You know, they're a bit higher and budget so they're very cast dependent. So sort of it's a frustrating, kind of like waiting game basically, because you're trying to get get through the gatekeepers, the agents to you know, read the project and then, you know, say whether they feel like they're client is right for it or not. And then and then there's the whole weading process with the actor to read it. It's and then you're also playing that dance of like the chicken or the egg of casting and financing at the same time. or which one do you do first, or do you try and do them at the same time? Yeah, I was going to ask like, is there like a an order that's ever like that you found is easier? Is it just literally just project by project, it's different of like is it easier to get cast members first or people to fund it first, or whatever, because it is a catch twenty two that you can't get a cast without funding. You can't get funding without a cast. Yes, but the the traditional way of doing it is you put your cast together and then you go out and science it. But I have found that I kind of I've done it at the same time. Parth it. Do think it's time for the BICKOHUNA final question? Yeah, sure, I think we can do that. Well, the Bigcou in. A final question is what is the last great film you watched? And by great we mean not good great. I know maybe I might see might is, maybe is uncool of me, but I loved the the West Side Story to remake. I went into it being I loved it too. I went into it being like this is should not be allowed, they should not be making this. I don't understand why and I can't be able task. It was just expertly done in every single way. I caught cried multiple times performances where he put the camera that that was something all throughout. I was just like it just I loved it. I heard west side story remake was coming out and I was like this is stupid. But it's uncle Steve soldid shot. I haven't seen it yet, but him and Janis Kaminsky. They seem to know what they're doing and also like the same songs. But the new didn't new dance, new dancing. What's not all? I well, I think that there was a lot. There was some of the original drum robbins choreography, choreography. There's some, but, like I the whole sales pitch was like we can't do the same movie with the same choreography because then you're literally just watching shot for shot remake or essentially, but they change the dancing a lot, but the songs were like note for note, pretty much the same. But yeah, yeah, like is there like a hot take you have about like which one you prefer? Or Oh, I prefer the the this student Spaleberg one. Wow, I kind of walked out thinking the same thing. I was like this is an easier watch than the original and it's like all the same songs I love and it's the modern version that's like more watchable. Yeah, you're just you're so engaged in them. In there, the characters and and you know, even though you know what's going to happen at the end, still like it still was just tragic, heartbreaking and just in the best way. It is unforgivable to speak on record though, putting down, putting down the original west side story, because like one of the greatest movies ever made. Right, right, but if any, if we're in a it's uncle Steve Possible. Well, part we want to bring s out. Yeah, thanks so much to Molly Ashure, former professor of my she's worked on a bunch of really cool movies, the rider, no bad land songs, my brother taught me swallow, all cool movies that you should rent or buy on itunes.

And Yeah, thanks so much for coming on and talking with us. Sure, what's son? Thanks Great. Wow, that was an interview. It sure was. Thank you to Molly Asher for her time. Is Very nice of her to come on the show give her worldly wisdom to us. You know, so I guess next week and now we know what. Now you know it's coming. Now you know that next week is Matrix editor Joseph Jet Sally, and that's a pretty awesome interview to yeah, that was a pretty good interview. And after that will be discussing the film. Do you think we'll have a guest? I kind of think this should be a trent versus part show. I think we have enough to say. You know well that episode require me to Rewatch all four matrix films, like if I mean you don't produce to I mean I've never seen matrix too or three, so I'm pretty uneducated. I mean having seen the entirety of Matrix for in like some people, it gives greater context to have seen two and three, but four is very much so, more related to the first matrix than the other two. But part the thing you're missing is after staying through the entirety of the liquors pizza credits, because that brought me more joy than the third act of Matrix resolutions. Now Trent loves pedophilic relationships. That's like. Hi. Returned to the Matrix for the final ten minutes and it was absolutely baffling and stupid and they flew. was almost like you hadn't seen the movie. Join US next week for our interview with Joseph Jets Sally. Follow us on our social media twitter, instagram. Give us a good review on apple, podcast and spotify. Is that it. Im missing anything. No part you said at all. I'm ready to that. I'm going to talk about the Matrix. What can I say? Well, you have to join US next week. Matrix, further, matrix numerouno. I'm said watch Matrix to okay, yeah, well, I mean I feel like you might not like it. We can watch it together. So well, I mean, we're allowed to not like the movies that we watch, even there allowed to. But when your opinion doesn't align with mine, it kind of upsets me because I'm just like smarter. Yeah, Jackson, front of the show, aligned you to a fascist in saying how you treat people who disagree with your opinions. He said that to about me. Yeah, he equated you to Benito Mussolini, famous dictator of Italy during World War Two. I'm comfortable with that, in the way that you would like to capitate or like subjects people to exit cution at whim if you had the resources. The thing is, I think most people don't have as good of a reason behind their opinions as I do, and as soon as they do I'll happily relinquish. But you thought everything. You thought everything through. I never don't and you're ready to go to the gray for it? Yes, sir, all right. Well, with that being said, this episode by Guys.

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