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Episode 111 · 1 month ago

NOPE (2022) with Production Designer Ruth de Jong

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent discuss Nope with its production designer, Ruth de Jong. Parth also teaches Trent how to make fried rice.

Edited by Parth Marathe

We are Tonight's entertainment. You can't handle the true the fire risals pizza. You're a wizard, Harry. You know do you think that's are you're breathing groovy? I don't have friends. Hellow trend, Hello Park, Ready to have a discussion about the movies. I'm ready to fucking rumble. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. You know you can't say or you can't play like the sound uh this the sound bite of let's get ready to rumble, because it's like trademarked very heavily, and the guy is like ready, like he's famous for coming after people. So let's not do that. Let's not insert that, but we can say it also in the Super Bowl weekend. I learned this working at the radio station briefly freshman year. But for the Super Ball, you can't call it the Super Bowl or be like there's a football game you can only refer to as the Big Game, and you can't name the teams involved because there's like legal implications. That sounds super stupid, yep. But we can say whatever we want on our podcast about movies, but we can't talk about TV at all or the radio. You know what we can talk about and what I would like to ask you about what you've what you've been eating recently? Trent, You're you're a psychic. After a hundred episodes, I have developed psychic powers of what is episode that sounds about right? I'm something like that. Yeah, I'm not counting until we get like near like one fifty or two hundred. Those we can celebrate. But all all episodes are looking looking sound the same. Right now, what have you been what have you been eating? Um? Friend of the show who you just saw in the frame but has since left, And now I'm in my closet. Um. So because Friends of the show, we're watching Halloween three season of the Witch, I think it's called UM in a common space, and they were playing it loud and they were making comments UM, and I was taking place, but then part and I had a date and so here we are. And so for the first time, I've moved into my closet rather than my desk, UM to accommodate the sound, even though I think they might have just finished the movie. But uh, they got pizza from Daniel's Pizza because Tats was closed because they were watching a spooky movie, and Jackson and Sarah got a full penny vodka pizza and Jordan's in front of the show got us slices. So I just had a chicken with the vodka sauce. Slice put in the toaster, ate it up, put some spices on it, ate it with a glass of water. What about you? That sounds pretty magical. I got back from class around five and five thirty. I was cooking some chicken, fried rice. I made some rice, put it in the fridge. Earlier in the in the morn, I had gotten back from TC and j at like thirty or something like that. Took a little shower, made some rice, put in the fridge, took a little nap, went to class, came back, cut some onions, cut some chicken cook, some onions cook, some chicken cooked. Some frozen vegetables. Um, well, I guess they were cooked, but I guess I just reheated. Well I saw tad them, um, And then made some fried rice and we had that. When you say fried rice, like I know, making rice and a rice cooker, or I know, like boiling it in a pot. But what's frying rice? Fried rice is when you make it and then you put it back in. So like fried rice is when you take rice, you keep it in the fridge so that it kind of clumps all together. M hm. It gives it a different texture, and then you put it back on the stovetop when you fry it. Yeah. I mean it's not like frying as in like deep frying, but like it's that's fried rice. Well, that's good to know. But what I'd really like to do is transition into this exciting interview movie of the day. Yeah, you know, yeah, the who did we interview someone about a certain movie? I don't know, Trent. Right now, we're in the intersection. But if we if we move on over and we play the intro music, I might just have some more information for you. Let's dare I say cut que que que the intro? Yeah, I think we should que the intro. Welcome back to Craft Services, where we talk about the movies.

Each week we talked about a film and hopefully have a crew member of that film to talk with us about their experience working on the picture. This week we are talking with who We had Ruth de Young, the production designer of this movie and other movies such as Manchester by the Sea, US and yellow Stone and our film for today obviously Jordan Peels Nope, so he's she's worked on two out of three of the Jordan Peel movies. That's pretty cool and exciting it is. Um, I thought, this is a great interview. It's an hour long. This is going to be a long episode. I mean, I think it was a great interview too. I had fun, We asked questions, she answered, we learned a lot about ourselves, about our bodies, about filmmaking. Um. I say, with all that being said, should we just cut into it? Yeah? Like, why not, Let's just let's let's speed this along que the interview. Hello everybody, and welcome to our interview with Ruth de Young. She's the production designer behind such projects as Manchester by the Sea, US Yellowstone, and our film for today. Jordan Peel's nope, thank you so much for being with us today. It's great to be here with both of you. Thank you for having me, of course. So just to start off, how did you first get involved with the film industry? Oh? Wow, good question. So I had just finished graduated from college. I got my fine Arts degree at TCU in Fort Worth, Texas, and I was my goal was to go on and get my master's in painting, and I was pursuing UM several schools, and I ended up deciding on Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and I guess, let me back up a little, but I'm I went to high school in Charlesville, Virginia, met Jack Vice. He was an incredible production designer. He and his wife, Sissy Space I lived here and his daughter and I grew up and we're very dear friends. And Jack had also gone to Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and had taken downe the fine arts route was very familiar with me and my work. And it was one summer eve between graduating college, going off to grad school, and he's getting ready to go do a film There Will Be Blood with Paul Thomas Anderson, and he said, you'd make a great art director. You should come art direct for me, and I'm thinking, what does an art director do? We sat around until two in the morning talking about art direction and filmmaking and fine arts, and you know, a lot of just the practices we were doing sculpture, light photography, space conceptualizations and how building a set and creating worlds was essentially one big sculpture. And that stuck with me and he kind of asked me again throughout the summer, and I just said why not? So I deferred, Uh, you could differ for up to two years and and still hold your place. Um. I deferred and was like, Okay, I'll go down and do this movie with you. And the rest is obviously never did go to grad school, So there will be Blood was the first film he worked on. It was Yeah, and then and then he continued to work with P. T. A On I think two more of his movies, The Master and Inherent Advice. And did your your role change throughout those three movies. Yes. I was assistant art director on The Master and I was art director on Inherent Advice. Um. So I continued to grow with Jack and I stepped with Jack. I was with Jack for about ten years, art directing with him, and then I eventually started designing Manchester by the Sea. I guess I had done a couple of little ones. Dead Man's Burden was a Western set in eighteen hundreds. I feel like a Swedish Auto was another really tiny India. So I did a couple um out on my own in between the films I was doing with Jack, and then Jack got the call to go do The Revenant and I at the time that I was doing Manchester by the Sea, and I just felt that it was a natural time to pursue designing and he was very supportive. It was bittersweet because Um, I loved so much working with Jack and we had such a great relationship, partnership, collaboration, and I love the directors um we were able to work with in the world we got to build, and so it was it was hard, but it was also just very a natural progression in my career. And um, Jack and I are still very dear friends. In fact, we all had dinner last night together, and so it's just it's wonderful because now we can all squaw advice on crew and projects, and you know,...

...it's it's so much fun to just have that deep friendship and and and in history as well as kind of support each other as we each go on in our in our in our ways and films. So obviously, another person that you've now had a longstanding creative collaboration with is Jordan's Peel And I was wondering if you could tell us how the two of you crossed paths and how that sort of blossomed from there of course. Um. I was on yellow Stone at the time, and my agent had gotten a call from Ian Cooper, Jordan's Monkey pop Um and they were on the hunt for a production designer and my name interested them. Remember Jordan's saying something along the lines of when we were getting ready to do us, He's like, I want the realness and the rawness of Manchester via the Sea, but I want the weirdness of Twin Peaks. So He's like, put those two together and let's go make us. Um, which I really appreciated just um. It helped me understand how he wanted to ground us and ground those characters and um. So long story short, he I met with his creative producer, Ian Cooper, who is absolutely fabulous. He himself came from fine arts. He was Sculpture was his background and he was actually a professor. N why you heading up the sculpture department? And then Jordan had asked Ian. They had grown up together since kindergarten on in New York City, best of friends and actually win their other partner at Montypo. The three of them had all grown up together. This was a very beautiful story, deep friendship, old friends, and here they are, you know, all out in Hollywood now doing great work. And Ian he really tasked Ian to find excellent collaborators and it's I mean, obviously, um no, we'll get to that. But it was a perfect example of just putting an awesome team together. And and so they found me. And I remember going to Monkey Pop for the first time and I forget I want to say, Jordan was out of town. I didn't even meet with Jordan's. I met with Ian for about a good hour and we just talked about movies and filmmaking and art and our process and design and and really hit it off. And he's like, I'd love for you to meet Jordan's. Oh, I know what it was. So I was, I was, I had I was in Montana making Elsman, so Jordan was back in town and I flew in for a moment, literally a lunch, met Jordan's at the best conversation um, and they were like, we'd love for you to do us. And I was afraid I wouldn't be able to do it because Yellows own their shooting schedule extended. Long story short, it worked out. It was thrilled at the best experience, and I think Jordan's Ian and I just deeply connected and um. They were very happy with the sets and the work and the crew, and it was a very seamless easy partnership that was uh and and then Nope. Um, so that's how initially how I met and Nope. It was sort of like we just stayed in touch and we're talking about different films and different projects and um Nope at the time was named the original title was Little Green Men, and uh, so we started talking about Little Green Men the summer of at length, just no script, just um lengthy conversations and spitballing and ideas and sort of I was doing a lot of mood board and just you know, trying to fill Jordan with material to continue to write and and build what he was doing. So it was it's so beautiful when you are able to have that sort of relationship where it's not formal. It was you could just create and develop this thing together. And so that's how we met. Speaking of other people you collaborated with on Nope, Hoy Van hoyma Um. Did you have any conversations with him about the production design? Koa is Um he's the best. I literally we tried to get Hota on us and votes at a place in his career. I mean, his work is absolutely incredible, and but he he's committed to shooting on film only, and we just didn't have the budget on us or at the time, Jordan wasn't in a position to really I think rock that boat.

Um on demanding we shoot on film. It's always a tricky one. But UM we call Jordan called Kita again on m for nope, and for a minute there we thought he wouldn't be available because of I think it was a Chris Nolan film, But that ended up changing. Um. The shooting schedule changed there and he was immediately in, immediately shooting. Then sixty we're shooting on imax. There's the world. But it was UM. The wonderful thing about hot To is he I presented everything to him, but he is UM. I think Jordan and Hoyton and I each had just a natural, very deep trust in one another, and there wasn't um. We each did our thing that makes sense. And in Hoita. I remember when I was designing the house that we built from the ground up, and I said, waita, here's your chance. Do you want to change any of the window positions, you know, in terms of light or this or that, and I remember great specifically it was like, roof, build it exactly how you want to build it. That's how it should be, that is what And I appreciate that. Pot and I both like things real, natural, authentic, like almost hard and awkward in a way to shoot because it's it's then not contrived and and too perfect, if that makes sense. So so I really did my thing, and Poiter would react to my thing and vice versa. And there was never there's a scene in the porta potty early in the film, after the horse to baccle on the commercial right, and that we had lengthy conversations, Okay, I'll just build you a porta potty. I'll take you know, build one with no scene on, or I'll build one with flyaway walls. And he's just at the end of the day, he's just like, no, I want to shoot a real porter body. I'm gonna take a six or five millimeter camera shoving in the door, and that's what we're doing. And it was like he's just great. It was just you know, nothing's ever I mean, I like the house, for instance, I had painted it, had chosen colors proved it got up there in Jordan and he walked out and I remember it was like, Ruth, it could be whiter, and I was like, you guys wanted whier, which you know after working with a Chibo and other dps, it's like, do not go wider, you go creamer. So I, um, we painted it overnight whider. But Pointon knew and this is what I didn't know, just how Imax the film would take white and how white translates to IMAX into a day for night and things he was doing, and I just said, great, I'll go whiter and that was ah, So I guess you know that that was how we collaborated. It was it was very open, very honest, very real, and I love that so much because nobody was walking on hl. It was all just we just put it out there, and um, I think we made the best product that way. Is Jordan's Peel similar in that way or is he like more involved kind of in how the sets are constructed, because I could see him being either way really because he's so detail oriented. But you know, yeah, I would say I really brought the worlds to him. Like when I I he had tons of research from me that he would go through so visually he could see the direction I was heading. He could see where my my mind was wrapping around things and aesthetically what I was leaning into. And we had a lot of like just our the vernacular, you know, we were there was a lot of films Hoita and Jordan and I were referencing. One of the major ones was Heaven's Gate, another one Once upon a Time in the West. Um, And so I think to your point, he'd know he didn't get in the weeds with what I was doing. He more, I would bring him full fully flushed out designs and then he would react to those. And um, I think the town, I just I knew that world so well from my experience on Westerns. There will be blood, just so many, you know, all the research I've done on the West, and I really and then really what I draw to Jordan is giving me more information on the backstory. Whose juke? What do you want this town to be based on? You know, really digging and crying for character information to help me design. And in terms of this specif the city, I would I named all the buildings,...

...but then I said, you marinate on these names and come back to me if you want to change any of them, and he would, and that's the details he would get into, you know, um naming, juke, jangle and and kind of just little subtle nuances. But really, uh no, he let me I did my thing, and then he only built upon that. And but I think I just listen very closely. I pay very close attention, and I think it makes it easier on him because he doesn't have to guide me. It's like, here, how about this, And he's like, this is better than I could have ever imagined. And you know, that's your That's my hope every time with the director, to sort of blow them away and make them just bringing their words to life is the most exciting thing. And I think a lot of times directors right, and they have a vision in their mind, but until they see it, they can't they're not ready to talk about it. And so I was I built white models. Um so the whole town and the house and the ranch was we did quarter scale models. I actually built a whole doll housefine model of the main house so he could work on blocking um he ahoyed and the actors. So it was I would just try to give him everything I could, so I could welcome his opinions and his thoughts, and he definitely does. He's very specific about blocking and sort of in the house, just how we opened up the living room, the dining room, widened the stairs, just made it. You know. Yeah, I think I answered your question. I'm rambling. I was going to ask. I read in another interview with you that you said that Jordan Peele uses a lot of storyboards, and I was wondering, like, based on what you're saying, I would assume that you build the sets and then he storyboards the blocking based off those or is it kind of yeah, it's both. He I think he has a vision, he knows exactly, so us we storyboard that us with storyboarded to a t. No, we did there, we did. There was storyboarding that he Jordan. I think as he's writing, he sees the whole scene in his mind and he wants to get that on paper. Then what he would do it if a set wasn't designed yet, he would then say, I would go back to the story boarder with the design and set going no, no, no, the doors over here, not over here. So there was a lot of redraw on that. But I think on No. I feel and and this was a lot with Kwaita too. We we we did storyboard, but we also there was much more organicness, finding it in the moment, finding it in the day. So I think but Jordan's style and preference definitely a storyboards. I think it's more for him to make sure he's getting exactly what he wants. And I would say Hoyta and I are a bit more free in a way because the especially in Nope, these worlds I created, We're three sixty, he could shoot them. There was no no, you can't look over there, you can't go It's like you can look anywhere, any direction, any time of day, um and have at it. So it opened a lot up to and they definitely found more shots and we sort of but a lot of the sequences with you know, um, the horse and the jean jacket and stuff like that, that was all storyboarded out, just the beats he wanted and and um, yeah, so it was it was, it was. I would say it was more free than than how we shot us. Us was storyboarded to a tea and we crossed out our storyboards every day because we were shooting. So we have some questions about like specific sets from nope, if that's all right, and uh uh. The first one is Jupiter's claim it was built like to scale, like the whole thing. Yeah, everything, Yes, Stupider's claim was built to scale, although we we messed with the scale a little bit, and I am trying to remember off the top of my head what like, for instance, the doors. Jordan's wanted it to be specific for kids. So I want to say all of our buildings, for instance, tapped out at like seventeen to twenty two ft high, whereas a normal building I think would have tapped out between twenty thirty. So we we sort of just shrunk it a bit. But I can't even remember the percentage we landed on um, but it it brought it down like when you're standing, when you're walking up the boardwalks. It just brought it down to where the adults felt pretty big and the kids. It was sort of so it wasn't a it wasn't It was by no means miniature, but it was we did. But stadium was all...

...to scale that we built, and the house was entirely to scale normal seven outdoors and you know, but the town we definitely messed with it in in a way, um just too. We wanted it to be very approachable to kids. Basically, I was going to ask about the house because it's it's such a character within the movie and just like what was building that like, and like like where in the world are you when you were filming that? Like where was it shot? Oh? We So both branches Jupiter's claim in the house were on side by side ranches in out in Santa Clary to Agua Dulce, And that was on purpose. So early on we started scouting the ranches right away because we knew we needed a horse ranch that the wranglers lived on and was there residents, and we knew Jordan was adamant about building Jupiter's claim from the ground up. There was a lot of push for us to find a western in town, um just from the studio, and I think fiscally, it's like, why don't you just find there's a million you know, backlot sets and this and that and find one, paint it whatever you want, turn it in. Jordan's like, no, it's not Jupiter's claim, which I was thrilled because I think Jordan and I knew what Jupiter's claim was, and we knew it was this themed frontier town in the world of Duke with psychedelic colors and just really off base. And and Jordan's had very specific blocking and the layout of the town in the well and the stadium, and we had scouted um. I'd reached out to my animals that are animal Rangular and Bobby lab Gren who lives up in that area. Most all Hollywood animal wranglers live up there. You can get a lot more land. It's big horse country. It's an hour from l A. That's just where they've all settled. And we wanted to authentic to that. And we went up there and Bobby's like, Ruth, you should go check out Firestone Ranch. I'm like, oh, it's a million things shot there. He's like, a few things have, but they've shot really in the in the in the landscape and use it for the land I think, like Fast and Furious did some car chase things down in the basin, But you would never know because the property wasn't featured. And so we um we went. We came, jordan Ian and I came to Firestone, three of us with our location manager Justin Duncan, and we're like oh shit, this is this is it? This is But it was the first place we saw, so we're like this, you know, We've got to like see twenty more before we can say this is it. But we loved how there was the bowl. It was surrounded by the hills, the sky immediately became prominent and um. Ironically, it was originally owned by William Mulholland, and he I think it was he built. There's this weird funky castle house on the property. Built in that he built. William Malholland is responcable for bringing water to Los Angeles Chinatown that whole. So he and his next door neighbor was Howard Hughes, who had a landing. So and I'm thinking, wow, back then at the turn of the century, these guys lived all the way out here. I mean, it was very fascinating. Um. And that. So that next door property was connected to Firestone Ranch. We took this fire road and it was a giant dirt parking lot. But the property was full of these hundred plus year old olive trees. And they're like, oh, yeah, Howard Hughes planted all those his estate used to be here. It burned down in a fire. Firestone has seen several fires too. I'm going, this is so strange, you know this these like just this Hollywood story and this holl was you know it was. I found it just very trippy and wild. But these two ranches, we were recreating these worlds on where these you know, had been set up by these by these two guys, and so anyways, that's we were coming. Once we located and decided, yes, this needs to be the Heywood Hollywood Horses property, we tasked our location manager to lock in the adjoining property, which was a giant, massive dirt parking lot. There was nothing except all of trees. But I just had a clear vision of how the town should be laid out. How when you look up that valley and to what is Firestone? I don't did that make sense to you guys in watching the film or did you think they were two entirely different places and we just sort of cut that they were literally right next to each other. That within yeah, I mean I probably thought that it was too good...

...to be true, that that that they were actually right next to each other, But within the narrative world, I it took a second, but I was like, oh, their neighbors. But just the first time he sees the lights in the distance and it's like the lights from the stadium. I thought that that was something alien related, but then they shut off and then the aliens come, right. But when so when when um, sorry, when you pulls up you know, when she steals and they're like, so, but when you pulls up, that's the fire road we initially took, which yes, and and so all those shots where we looked down. Oh and then when at the end when m jumps on her electric bike, and so that was we practically shot that, you know, all the way down and yeah, but but I could see how it could easily look like, yeah, but they just have cut in here. But I think for us it was the meta of I just think that the acts for Jordan and I were quite There was something that inspired our process by making it regardless of the audience ever knows it was important to us, if that makes sense, just the essence of of of the storyline, um, because it was always told to us, even you know, the producers were like, oh, go you know, find that ranch and find that ranch for that. Then I was like, you guys, it makes so much sense because we can be building this town. The way we laid it out shooting wise is we started at Firestone Ranch and we shot all of Firestone Ranch out. I don't remember how many days. Um, we're there for a month, two months, whatever it was, and then I'm building. I'm building Jupiter's Claim the entire time, so Hayti and Jordan could peel over at lunch, they could come over after. So it's constantly like here's the progress, here's how it got you know it was, and the company move it made it so clean because you're facing at Firestone for x amount of time and then you're just wheeling the trucks down the road and setting up base camp at Jukes Claim. And then we did have to do a few pickups and it was like okay, we'll just run back to the ranch and get this, get that. So it was a really smart way to do it and make it and maximize our days in our time. Yeah, because you have a home base where like literally like sixt of the movie takes place exactly, and you aren't spending all this time like with transposed, resetting up base camps and running all over the place and two hours in this way and you've got crude. It's like I and so many times I would be over there while we're building jukes and they're like, Ruth Jordan needs you on set. It was like great either a five. You know, it was so great to be able to be so part of the shooting world and things that were coming up and needing addressed and and nobody's I just thought it was so smart and efficient and we were all just thrilled. We're like, this is beautiful. It was a pain. And the asked to drive out there, Okay, it was, but it wasn't because you knew it was so valuable to the picture and to the story. It was just, you know, it's a big commute from from l a proper out there. It was a good, good hour since two hours a day, you're just you know, it very early in the morning and very late at night. But it was worth every minute of those drives. Trent and I have done some short film shoots and some treacherous locations and it's not until you're on a film shoot do you realize how treacherous company moves are. Yes, well, they just gobble so much time and they and they're costly and it it's it takes away from you and from Jordan being in it with his actors. So I did everything I could in my power to to minimize that and just think smartly location wise and set up, and Jordan was fully on board. Um wait, I mean it was just a no brainer. It was great. It's great. I wish we could make every movie like that. Out side of the Jupiter's Claim the next the Gordys Home Set. I was wondering if there was any particular like nineties television show you were taking inspiration from, or if you were just going for like a broad strokes of can you guess, uh, do you have your time? If you were, um, I wasn't alive, but like it gives me like kind of a full housey vibe. But I don't know if that's a fair comparison. Yes, it was definitely full Houses what I leaned into more not in the aesthetic of the house, um, but the layout just sort of that open Yeah. That was and and full House is just such a iconic nineties TV show. Jordan's, Ian and I are all nineties babies. Um, we were all born in the early eighties, so I mean just that was our childhood. So we had a lot of opinions about shows, but we were...

...looking at tons of shows. But then I leaned into the story of forty, you know, with the mom's this astronaut in Florida, Cape Canaveral. So that was the stuff that just you know, we we went. We went ham on me um the fortification of the interior in terms of the aesthetics of the you know, early nineties pottery barn, you know, covered sofas and just it was so much fun and it was so ugly. It's like it was. It was a blast and Jordans loved it and um and at the last minute we originally hadn't designed the kitchen. Um. At the last minute, Jordan's it was like, you know what, just it was a window there. He's like, oh no, it was a door, and he goes, when you just add, I'll never go in the kitchen. I just want to see, you know, when the dad runs in there and get scored. So that was fun. We just threw that together really quickly when it was already built on stage and then he's like, you sat a kitchen yep, happy to so it. Yeah, that was so much fun too. I've never done TV the multi camera you know, um half hours that come set up, So I had to do a lot of research just the cameras they used, how they shot it, Like, there's just all these specificities to that. One of um my wonderful art directors and a lot of TV so she could speak into that, and we got a set designer who had done so you know, there's just such a um specificity to the way they do those. I mean, they've got it down to it science. So that was fun just getting into that. And then you know, yeah, it was that was a lot of in between Gordy's home and the scene where they're shooting the commercial with the horse and the green screen, there's a lot of like you guys filming film crews, and it's such a on inversion of like all the lingo, and it's like, are we making fun of ourselves? You know, yes, of present And I think Jordan's i mean, ultimately, you know, this is a film about spectacle and about the film industry, and about exploitation and about so many things that we could go met on, but he Jordan's I think had so much fun, especially for the commercial seen writing those whips, you know, with it was every every archetype on set the flirty grip. Yeah, yes, that was hilarious. We're tracking up. That was so funny. So yeah, and that was just simple. We did that at Universal on the sound stage. Um it was like doing and Hoyton, I do a lot of commercials um in between features. Um so we we were just you know, just padding Jordan with so much content in terms of like, oh, where is the agency going to sit? And where are the black other sofas and where's the crafty and where's the dead So it was fun to just really um yeah, um so I was going to ask, there's a lot of destruction two sets that happens in the movie, and like, what is it like having to design a set that you know you're going to have to like tear apart kind of or repeatedly destroy? It was, I mean the good news. I remember always being like, okay, I think the only thing that worried me the most was realizing you need to go back and reshoot something, which we didn't do. We made sure we you know, watched the Allies and made sure we were good. But but then you're just like all right, I mean I helped to rip up Jupiter's claim, and ah that was not I mean not literally but out there with carpenters and rooms, but no where this thing, take this bench out, you know, just destruction and it's look, it's it's it's equally as a part of the story and to the level and the degree that Jordan wanted to push it. You just want to make sure it's right and it's appropriate. It didn't. It didn't bother me, I guess at all. I'll never forget blood. We physically covered that house in a blood substance. Um. It was actually it was funny. It was the weekend of my forty birthday, but we had to shoot the house and that that was one where I was like, are you guys sure, because once this house goes to this, going back is going to be really tricky. We did. I did do a washaway substance, which worked pretty well, but I remember Jordan was like, can you make it richer?...

And I said, I can, but it's going to be more permanent like this stuff I can hose off and he and White were adamant, like we don't need to go back. We are in the bloodhouse till the end. So that so we spent the whole weekend. Set dressing was like dumping like the carts and drilling things into the roof and you know that the icy cart was up on top and um it was really fun and wild and crazy and we yeah, we just went went to town and um it. And then it was funny watching people roll up to set on Monday. They're just like, oh my gosh, this is it was it was. It was just such a you know, it was fun, but it's okay if you can't close this. But were there any sets you designed that didn't end up finding themselves in the movie. No, because I would say the only thing was the town was much Jupiter's plane was much larger. Um our initial designs were were we went big and and we had to get real with budget and that was a painful process because Jordan and I were so attached and pitted to all of the buildings. But we started I kind of had to go, that's gotta go, that's gotta go, that's gotta go. That's and the town sort of. But that's a good thing, because I don't know that that was the that scale and size might have felt. I think exactly it was good to have to go deep and go let's really think about this, Let's really think about this walk and talk. Let's think about and and and get to where we need to be to be able to do it all. And we I mean, it was incredible to world build that much on on a film and and be afforded the time and the budget. And it's not it's it's it's not the norm. So during the walk and talk, you definitely established like that whole like main street sort of feeling. But with you saying that there was originally more, I guess within as the viewer, I figured that there was more and you just weren't seeing it. And so I think that's exactly how we redesigned the whole thing, so that that there would be offshoots. Yeah, because you see like the main stadium, but then you're like, this is just like the main hub of Disney World, and then there's branches you know. Yep, that was our goal. That worked because basically I said, we I changed the entire um. You you wanted to feel like once you entered like Disneyland, you don't even know how to get out because it's like all these arms and off shoots. But we also wanted it to be believable that j could have afforded to me because because it can be it can actually be Disneyland, because that would be insane. Yeah, exactly, So we we needed to bring it down in that reason story wise too, because you're like, everyone's gonna be like, well, this is such a fallacy, like how did he get all this money and did he have crazy investors? And so we you know, we tried to we tried to check ourselves very closely so that our characters made sense in their environments and in their worlds. And but um, yeah, to that point, I tried to just give the whole thing the correct depth in space and Expanse and Um Jordan Hoyto were thrilled. I mean they had so much fun shooting at it was so sweet. I mean, do you guys now the Universal has moved that entire set to the back lot at Universal Studios and it is now part but you can both of you can go see it if you're ever in l A or um you can do the tram ride through. Yeah. Well go it's go online and go to Jupiter's Claim dot com right now and you can see, Um, you can get tickets. It's cool. So when you, you should definitely go if it's it's very old to see up close and in person, and that is I don't think I know through Universal they have never ever open to set. The weekends are opened and attracted the weekend the same weekend the movies opened and they did that. Yeah, that was huge for Jordan and I. We were just very flattered and honored. And because all the movies you see on the back lot tour that both parts and I've both been on and it'll be like the it'll be like Psycho or they're all so old and so do think they're so and so to think like really wanted the house. We really wanted the house next to the Psycho house. But and they just knocked. They just knocked on Grench World, So nothing do they really? Yeah, yeah, but they so I know. But then you round the corner and that's the World of Worlds and you're like the ship it's awesome, so where it goes war the world and then you go...

...once you go through the World of the World, you go up the hill and then you go through Jupiter's Claim and then you go into Fast and Grand Finale. So yeah, I mean it all it all ends up being about family in the end, you know, so you guys have to do it. Yeah, give I passes o WHOA Okay, Trent, unless you have another note related question. I had one last one just about notet. You have horses that you have to contend with on set, and I just made a documentary about a horse farmer, and horses are not easy. Um there, you know, they're they're big and like heavy and like they do their own thing. So like, is that difficult on set? And how many times if it was, like was it ever? Like Jesus, we have horses on set? Um, great question. No, it wasn't difficult. I've had a lot of years with horses almost. I feel like the majority of my movies have had horses. From There will Be Blood to Water for Elephants, Yellowstone was hundreds of horses. So I'm I'm very familiar with them and comfortable with them and understand them. But these are all very well trained, so they are not They almost pay better than the actors. I'm joking kind of, but Daniel, he seems crazy in a way that you know they have called times and they're they're on time because they're you know, I'm teasing entirely. But no, they there, the horses not at all. It's so easy because they're just so on point. They have their markers. They did so Jordan's these guys trained with them, and I try to get this sets ready, Like I built the huge arena in front of the house, the training arena. I got that ready earlier Bobby Um, so he and his team could train in the I wanted them all to be familiar with all their spaces to the horses, and these are horses that are used to film crews. It doesn't frighten them. They're not kicking, they're not going crazy. They're not you know, if you went to just a random horse farm in Virginia and Kentucky and anywhere, Texas, californiaa, the horses would freak out. But these horses are just um conditioned, I guess you would say. So. Um it was. They were wonderful and they were very on point. And obviously you had stunt writers doing a lot of the hard, um difficult bits, and um they were good around dust and helicopters and crew and so that was all that. The horse aspect of it was seamless, and they were you know, the horses themselves doubles in case something happens, so you know, to one of them. So it's it's all that that works out great. Um, obviously Gordy was was a c G. I I think that was all of our animals, praying mantis. There's like a little oddball things was you know. But yeah, so we were going to ask what, like, you're what was the set you were most proud of? But I feel like we've talked about a lot of them, and so I just have one more specific one. And it's like Jukes secret room, man cave, the room and also his his office also just has so much going on in the background. But but the Gorty room in particular, did that take inspiration from anything that was really made up? Because it was such a weird, creepy thing, you know, his obsession and and the weirdest and that I think Jordan and I that took a little bit longer to put our nose on what it should be. Um, but I think Jordan's early on clearly envisioned this museum esque space, this white and it ended up being just this white kind of start gallery styled place. And in the beginning we were sort of like, well, what kind of rooms should be? Are there sofas and chairs in it? Is it? You know that line like well the Dutch couple spent the night for fifty K and that who you know, we were just sort of like but ultimately it was it was a memorabilia space that Juke was trying to capitalize on from super fans, you know, through COVID. It was his kind of bread and butter and the other cool we you know, cut out a door in Juke's office at Jupiter's Plan, Juke's office that Jupiter's Plan was practically built inside the building, so that was all seamless, and then you go through the door and we cut to stage and we should we built the Gordon Room on stage. Um. Still...

...and that we shot kind of towards the end of production. But um, I think it was really fun putting all the memorabilia together. Um, and just you know in such a very specific way, um, the the curation of it. So um, yeah, Trent, do you mind if I move on to non Nope related questions just a minute, Speedie, can you say hello, I'm just in This is Sadie my three earl. We go get a tissue from Grammy I'm almost done. Okay, thank you. We'll get out of your hair soon enough. No, no, no, no, don't worry you think it is another hoy To collaboration is upcoming. Um. And I'm a big Nolan fan. Trent like Nolan, like you're working on Oppenheim? What's what's that? What was? I mean, I know you probably can't say much, but like, correct, what was? What was? That's finished shooting? Right? Yes? Correct? We we wrapped Chris's editing and that was an incredible experience and I think um that came about obviously through my relationship with Koita on No and Chris looking for a designer, so it was very seamless. And I wrapped Note on a Tuesday and was with Chris on Wednesday, so it was just right into it. But No, working with Chris was incredible experience, such a different film too, and it was I I actually enjoyed going from something so imaginative and sort of you know, this was really from the mind of Jordan's Um hang on one second, let me just hey, says I'm just gonna finish up. Okay, okay, are you gonna sit here and be quiet? Okay? Um? No sweeping Um This was to go to doing you know, a story on a real person and in real life events and crossing multiple periods um from you know, we started twenties, thirties, forties, fifties, sixties, so that was you know, you're just FLEXI very different. So I need you to go do me a favor. We could go find Graham for me, please and hang on. I'm so sorry you guys to seconds totally fine, Well, sorry about that. We've had multiple guests being interrupted by their cat or their dog. Um So, No. I enjoyed kind of totally switching gears and it was like it was it was you know it. Um. We also I had very huge builds as well, but also a lot of locations. Um so it was a nice and just having that shorthand with Boita was great at that point. Obviously it was my first time working with Chris um but I loved every minute of it. And I think he is um just I love the way he operates and and runs a production and he's he's so heavily involved, similar to Jordan's. But he it was awesome. It's okay if I'm wrong, but there was some filming of Oppenheimer in Princeton, New Jersey. Did you visit? Did you visit our home state? So are you? Did you guys? Yeah, we were there. Well I found owned out from like online while on Twitter that like there were set photos that were getting released by people on their iPhones of Chris Nolan in Princeton while you guys were shooting and Matt Damon was there. And I was in Ewing, which is like twenty minutes away from Princeton, and I was like, do I do I go there? But then, um, I had other things to contend with unfortunately, But um, I really I really was written down your next and you didn't even know it. Yeah, that was us. So yeah, I think you'll love seeing all that footage. And again that was a place that was very specific to Oppenheimer. Do you guys know much about Robert Oppenheimer? Just not personal? He has become death destroy of worlds. I know what he did, but nothing about him. I Actually, my roommate is very big into history, and so when it was announced that Oppenheimer was the newest Nolan film, she gave me like, like he...

...was sleeping around with his colleague's wives is what I know. Um, And that's kind of it. That's hilarious. Um, Princeton was, it was a big He spent a lot of time in Princeton, was it was my point. So he was based later in life at I a. S. He was the director the Institute of Advanced Studies, which is I think a part of Princeton, but its own situation. But so, man, Princeton is beautiful, really beautiful. The town it's very just quaint, and the school is gorgeous. But yes, we that was us. We were there. The kids came out in the masses when we were shooting on the grounds. It was pretty wild. When you're shooting in public places, is that often a problem or is you just like try to keep as discrete as possible, but teenagers are still taking pictures and you just have to move forward. It depends, I think it depends. Oftentimes you can own it. All depends on what Like if you're shooting in New York City, in l A and certain places, certain things are just public property that you can't close down entirely your own outright. If you're shooting on private property, you can own it outright and kick everybody out. It just all depends. So, um, we were shooting we shot a scene and note that got it ended up being edited out, but we were in Hollywood Boulevard in front of the Chinese Fans Theater and we shot a huge scene. And yeah, you get crowds because people like catch on outstaying and Jordans and whatever. And obviously Chris. I feel like we were scouting all over the US and everywhere I went with Chris, and we were on a lot of college campuses just because of Oppenheimer's you know, he was a professor in different various things. But it was wild, like even at Berkeley, I remember students were clocking him right and left. Mr Nolan, Mr Long, can I get your I was like, this is crazy. I mean it was. It was They're like Matt David whatever, Mr Nolan. Um. So it was very sweet, and you know, it's it's fine. Sometimes it's annoying. Sometimes it's fine. It's whatever. It's part of it, right. Um. So, Yes, when we were filming at brookelen we had a lot of kids like hanging out buildings and like you know, you just um asked them kindly if they're in your frame, to close their window, but you know their dorm. It was it's it wasn't. It was never an issue per se. But it's yeah, I mean it's a spectacle. Um. So another film that you worked on that I actually only just recently saw and really loved was Manchester by the Sea and you you kind of just spoke about it, but uh, can you talk just a little bit about that just because I my girlfriend should be that movie end. It was really really good. That was a really special film. Um. I loved Kenneth Fonnergan. I think he is an insanely talented writer director. Um. I thought Casey knocked it out of the park. I mean he was awesome. That whole experience was wonderful. It was a very small film. It was maybe five or seven million, I can't even remember exactly. It was all location based, So for me, I'd like to approach those as you know, you don't have these large budgets, which is fine, so you want to be able to give the world. It's obviously we were lucky enough to go to the place, film in the place and then capitalize on and for me, it was all about finding the best locations um that were either partially dressed mostly anything you could do to just get more bang for your buck on screen as well as you know, knowing the size crew and the resources you have, so I try. I just approached that, um by scouting the heck out of Manchester Bloster all around and really wanting that region to be a heavy character because it was to that, to that place that they lived. Um, and I think it came across. I think it did. I mean, you know, just that the lives those guys lived there and being fishermen and voters, and it's hard, and you wanted that to be I just you know, you want. I wanted it to be purely authentic and natural and honest and real in their homes and their spaces to just you're like, oh, yeah, this is this is Cape An which is where all those little um whatever you call them parishes or whatever are um, because it's like Manchester lost to Rockport,...

...you know all those But I think, um, yeah, that was and it was a very intimate crew and and Jody Lee Lips was the cinematographer. UM. I thought he did a beautiful job and it was it was a really sweet group of folks and we just um yeah, and Kenny's I mean I think he won an Oscar for Best screenplay. Actually, um it was. I know we were nominated for several categories, but I think obviously he and and Casey went for Best Acting. But they it was so pure and honest and and just executed so brilliantly, and and it was. It's so fascinating working with different directors because they're each one is so unique to themselves. And I, to be honest, I primarily only worked with writer directors, I realized, And I think there's a reason. I love that the story is birthed within that director, and so that when you're making a picture, it isn't there's just a natural attachment and that director knows. Like what I love about each of these different directors is they'll pivot all day long because they can because it's their story, and their story can change and evolved through what the cinematographer, the designers bringing to the table, and it can It's this malleable thing and you're able to just be right there and work it out right there, and I it's so funny, I guess, yeah, And I I'm trying to think what I've done that was written by somebody else, directed by somebody else, produced by somebody else. Because those things. Well, not to discredit them by any means, but you I think I think about and when I get those scripts, it's like, well, who's who's motivating the shoot? Is it really the studio and their interest? Is it really this director? Is this director just for higher? Is it what is his his or her his attachment to the story? And and then the writers the writer even involved, and it is I, oh, I know Water for Elephants was written by somebody, and then Francis Lawrence directed it, and I remember the writer and then Foxes producing it. But then I just remember a lot of it, like the writer was on set, oh no, no, no, that you can't change that line. That's she needs to you know, and you're kind of like, well, I don't know. It's it's purely I think personally. I really enjoyed the process of working directly with because when the writer director, it's like that person has like thought about it like every day and like the shower for like years, and so like they have the entire folbox to adapt according to the problems. But when you're adapting someone else's work, I don't think you've thought about it as long and hard and like brought it through every stage of existing. Yeah, exactly, exactly, Yeah, and exactly, And I think it's it's this living thing inside of them and and ultimately they have complete autonomy over the script and so it's like perfect. I don't have to wait for six people to like give it an approval. So I have one more small question before the final question, and that is my girlfriend grew up in l A County, and so in Fries, electronics came on the screen. She freaked out and she was like, that's not She was like, that's not there anymore, like how they do that? And then and then they cut an inside and she was like, it kind of looks like that, but it's not exactly like that. And so she'd kill me if if I didn't mention it. But how did how did that work? So great question obviously Fries what it was, and I can't electronics beyond even electronics store. It was iconic to southern California. It was iconic to the eighties and nineties. And I think Jordan's loved that idea of it's like we're in southern California, we want to do everything as real as possible, instead of picking best buy or some you know, dumb big box store that's just Middle America vibes. We we wanted something very specific and very um and I think we loved that, you know, the Fries. It was family owned and Randy Fry had you know, gone to all these artists and created all these whacking more thematically consistent exactly so. But and and we had scouted six or seven Fries stores and we selected the Burbank store and it was November, and you know, my Apple news pops up and it's Fries closing all stores closing, liquidation. And I immediately texted the upm...

...im media texted Jordan and I was like, dute. I was like, what does this mean? So we immediately dug into what does this mean? And then Jordan was like, forget it. By the time the movie comes out, Fries will be gone. To your girlfriend's point, people like, nope, I'm just gonna Ruth crew. Let's he Immediately, I think jerk reaction went to like, create a faux big box store and we'll just build it. And I was like, no, we can't do that. We can't do that. With everything we painstinkily like, you know, Jupiter's claim is created because it doesn't exist. It's not like we're trying. But I was like, let's just shoot Fries and let's call Randy, the owner who's basins. Anyways, we just went down this rabbit hole and I just sort of kind of let Jordan's sit with it for a beat, and then he came back and was like, Yeah, we're gonna shoot Fries and so we did everything in our power. Basically, they liquidated all this orders. Randy owned the building and the property of the Burbank store. He had to liquidate a lot of things inside of it, but was able to keep a lot, So we just worked with them. We did have to fill all the shelves. It was a massive dress for set deck, et cetera. But we ended up going for it, and we we put our own spin on some of the graphics and some of the things, and just like punched up the Fry's logo just for fun and but but we had complete authority to use Fries and Randy and his wife were actually um extras. They were in the stadium and they loved it, so they were around that gave us the Fries van, which we ended up re wrapping with like creating the whole tech thing or the you know brandom phrase character angel and so that was so fun and that was on it and I said, you guys, and we basically pitched it to Randy, like this will be an homage to Rise, this will be iconic, this will be forever more on film. Yeah exactly. So he was so down and a big man of Jordan's. And um, that is how we did that part. Do you think it's time? I think it's how we unleashed the big cahuna, um, big cahuna. Final question, um is what's the last great movie you watched? And it can be a new release or a rewatch. I watched Out of Africa two weeks ago, and I love that. I just thought that film was so beautiful. Maybe it was just I don't know that. Have you guys looking it up right now? Don't? I don't. I haven't even heard of it. I don't think it's Uh it's definitely starring Uh well, it's strikeed by Cindy Pollock. Uh. And it was, uh, it was not too bad. It's nominated for Best Picture and Merril. You guys should watch Brobert Redford. Need I go on. It's really it's so gorgeous, and I they don't make films like that anymore, and it's wait, sell us, give us your elevator, pitch on. No. I just think, I mean, they just you. They hang on scenes obviously, it's it's the most epic, picturesque, beautiful. You don't have to remind me who shot it if you're y it is shot by um David Walkin, okay. Um, it just it's gorgeous. It's stunning. And they hang on scenes and they're long, and they just it's Meryl Streep and Robert Redford, um, and their relationship is just so beautiful and they just let it play out. But they don't make you guys, actually will be interesting. You two should watch it because I think your generation, I just people don't. People can't hold on films like that anymore. Like in the theater, I think people would be like, what is that? You know it's it's it's um, but I watched yeah, I just damn, that's such a beautiful, great film. Um. It's about this baroness to move down to Kenya to start a coffee farm. And wait, I have seen this movie, but I saw it like when I was very young, because I think my mom likes it's a it's a it's a tear. I mean, it's sad, but it's good and it's it's I loved it. So Parts should should I bring us out trying? Yeah? I think I think we're good. Well, thanks again so much. This is production designer RUTHA. Young. She's worked on such cool projects as Manchester by the Sea, US Yellowstone and our film for Today, John Peel's note, thanks so much for being with us. Thank you guys. It was such a pleasure, so much fun. Trent Part...

...that was a fucking awesome interview. You. No, it was an awesome interview, and it was so awesome that I was about to address you by your full first, middle and last name, and then I thought, I don't know parts middle name. Trent. We have had this conversation a few times. Do you not have one? No, I have one. It's my father's name. Oh yeah, uh so it's Parts. So then, Murte, So is that unique to your family or is that like the expectation in the Indian culture. I guess like the Indian people I know generally take their dad's first name as their middle name. So Verage Murante also has the middle name so then vol, I see, okay, So next time we finish and interview, I'll make sure to address you. And if I forget what your dad's name is, I can just log into any of the streaming services that you've given me access to through your family and go onto your dad's profile and and study the spelling. That sounds about right. Or I can go into Varage's childlock to HBO Max profile and isn't that great. I don't understand why he's childlocked, And I can like search up like boobs and boobies and touching boobies, and then your mom will see it and she'd be like Barage muratte you know, yeah, that that'll be interesting. Um. But back on the topic at hand, Um, good interview, Thank you so much. Great coming on and uh, you know, talking with us. I think there's some really cool stories in there. Chatting, discussing, conversing, does it all? We we did it with her. But next week you can look forward to us this discussing. Nope, shooting, shooting the ship. Just prior to recording, Trent informed me that there were rumblings of a guest. We'll have that discussion. We'll have that discussion. When we get closer to that discussion, we need to have a discussion before the discussion about the discussion. You see, Trent. Trent and I are very busy men. Now. I'm a senior, he's a junior, and quite frankly, we have hair on our chests in places we never knew their hair could be. I wouldn't go that far, but um, quite frankly, this is the most amount of time we get to talk to each other the podcast on air. No, it's true, and seeing you out of context in real life feels supernatural at times. Sometimes when I when I passed, when I'm like going to the bathroom or something, and I passed by you in the equipment room and like, oh right, he's a he's a real person that I talked to. And I'm you never know who you're gonna get you pass the equipment room, because it could be a friend a foe, but you never know who's on the other side of the door. But yeah, part, it's always a pleasure when I see you out in the wild, just existing, killing it, chilling it. Um, you're yeah, I just see you from a distance. I'm like, who's that really attractive medium sized guy? And most of the time it's you. That's I'm you know what, I'm glad to hear that. Yeah, that you're medium sized. Okay, I mean maybe not maybe not glad but um alright, uh, next week discussion. Will there be a guest? Will there not be a guest? Who knows? These days, it's a crazy time we live in. Um, but we definitely will have a discussion out for you next week. And then um it's we're we're coming up on the last movie for Halloween. Yeah, i mean spook Tacular. Since the spook Tacular spook Tak the slate is public knowledge, we can say that's Bodies, Bodies, Bodies. We talked to the composer disaster Piece. It was fucking awesome. I'm excited to talk about the movie general discussion. Maybe that'll just be the boys since there's no current rumblings, but you never know when the rumblings will start to rumble. Truly, But that being said, part Um, I'll see you next week for the discussion, and I'll see you before that to discuss the discussion. I'm glad to hear it. What percent is your laptop? A fun fact when we started this intro afterro recording. My laptop is at eleven. I am now at four, So I say we call it quits before any audio files go crazy. And all right, you know by guys like can subscribe started to us. Tell your friends, Yeah, Apple Podcasts and Spotify, tell your friends about the show. We really appreciate rush, Rush to the end. Um, have a nice day or even ny my battery.

It's dying, diminaghing the recording. It's ending. Okay, it's ending.

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