Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Craft Services
Craft Services

Episode 115 · 3 weeks ago

MAGNOLIA (1999) with Sound Mixer John Pritchett Part One

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent talk about Magnolia with its Sound Mixer, John Pritchett. They also record their longest intro yet.

We are tonight's entertainment. You can't handle the true the fire risals pizza time. You're a wizard, Harry, you know do you think that's are You're breathing groovy? I don't have friends. Hello Trent, Hello part If that scene is your real name, you seem closer to me than ever before, well not ever before. We sat at this exact table, and yeah, I realized done this exact thing many a time before, specifically and most recently Charles for dis Drunk Pod. That's the only one of our episodes that doesn't have a year listed, because the year is that we were drunk when we recorded it. Um. But here we are back in the so Cam two nine apartments, room room one. UM in the we're on the top floor. We'll just say the Penthouse suite. Yes, yeah, the Penthouse. But to Happy Halloween, Trent. As of recording. Maybe we've featured many Halloween themed episodes over the years, but for scheduling and fun reasons, I feel like this is the first time we've ever recorded on Halloween. We've ever been we've ever been required to. I think last year we released an episode on Halloween that was the must have been because last Halloween was a Sunday ye and happy Birthday? Verage Murat, whoa you think for Rage is? Is he dressed up friend of the show? No he's not. He was going to borrow my top gun jacket, but you were wearing it just minutes ago. That was why Pete Maverick Mitchell. Yes, do you think for Rage's trick or treating? Or is he too old for that sort of stuff? I think I don't. I know that he wants to, but I don't think scheduling wise, he can. I feel like he's right on the age cusp. Wait do you know how old he is now? Oh? Yeah, nice, he's right on the age cusp of being too old? Or are thinking he's too old or thinking he's too cool, or thinking he's not cool enough. I know I was telling him like good places to go trick or treating that I'd gone to. Um, you want another place Cindia? Doesn't that sound sounds like you can say that but I can't. Yeah, basically a lot of Chinese and Indian American UM kids will live there in Bridgewater, although I don't think it's in Bridgewater technically, but Bridgewater kids go there or live there. Is that the name of a neighborhood or no, it's it's it's colloquially as Cindia. It's not. It's legal name is not Cindia. But anyways, I was saying that, is it just a sector of Bridgewater your hometown? Yes, but again I'm not sure if like Cindia is technically on the outskirts of Bridgewater. Okay Cindias, pardon me, exact location and where you said it and not making very uncomfortable and the hesitation only made it, only made it some more. No, it's it's I'll give you the past one time. Um. But yeah. So I told him that he should go trick or treating in that area and he was like, I'm not going there. I don't have any friends there. I don't want to go there. It's all about where the king sized bars are, where about where your friends are? And I was like, what what's wrong with you? Is at the age I mean, and he's taller than you, to the fact that he could make the argument of I have money, probably not a lot, but definitely enough to go to the grocery store and buy a bag of candy. Trent, you sound ridiculous and right when you reach that point, It's like I could I could justify not going trick or treating. I had chips ahoy because I was right out of class walking with Trent, actually straight from class. Um, and I was feeling peckish because I had kind of a small lunch all sweet tooth. Oh it is Halloween, after all, it is. Um. You need your your your quota, sweet quot. And we had to record because I'm going home right after this to...

...go celebrate Rod Baratte's birthday. Um. And I offered you chips awoy because you could not remember what you'd eat and last, but then you said, no, pack, I got this, are remembered. Yeah. No. When we're not recording, I actually sound like Jason Statham when I talked to you. Um, but the crank too, it's Michael don you know from the Mage Know he says that wasn't appeared in Collateral, that and Jurassic World Dominion. But anyways, when is when is Jason Statham interested? Where the joke was that Jeff Goldblin, But he is in Collateral. He is in Collateral. I thought that's where this was going. But do you want to know what I've been eating? Um? I was in zoom class and Sarah broughtman friend of the show. Well officially and unofficially was weird. Gray Area was going to Hidden Hidden Grounds, which used to be Simply Chi. Yeah, I'm just saying where on Ham I'm just saying streets now, but on Eastern on Eastern there was a coffee shop used to be called Simply Chi, and it was reabsorbed by Hidden Grounds, which was the parent company that it broke free from. And now it's a sad story because it's been retaken over. Damn. That sucks. Um, but they saw it. It's the same exact menu. Um. But it is a fun restaurant in that at any given moment, despite paying the same amount for some food, you could be given their avocado toast and it could be either very good or surprisingly mediocre. And today was a really good day in that in that department. Um at the first half and then I tucked it away it's work. And then I reopened it and there was one small all fly on it and I thought, I'm gonna gonna swat you away and then eat the second half. That's all you can do at that at this point in my life. Um, And what would I'd really like to do at this point in my life. I'll sit back, Sit back with my boy path, eat some chips, ahoy cookies, talk about the film of the week this week. You know how you get there? There's only one way. I'm lost. I need trouble navigating. Wait, Trent, to get to the intro if you first, Oh my god, I'm hearing something in the distance. I think it's the sound of the dangers grabbing up. I apologize to anyone who listens some more than one episode of our show, because because now it's just in every because you just repeat the same joke. Oh but this is the first episode of Cruisi of Palooza. Oh wow. So for the first time, maybe ever, it's it's motivated us doing this actually makes some sort of sense with recording Jesus. Cue the intro. Welcome back to craft Services, where we talk about the movies. Each week we talked about a film and hopeully have remember if that film to talk with us about the experience working on the picture. Trent. Now that I have you here in my grass, I'm part and I are doing like an et touch with our index fingers touching in the middle of designing room tad. It's pretty magical. Um, but this week we are talking about one of your guys, one of my guys. Yeah, oh oh, as in the director of the film is one of my...

...guys. Yeah, Um, Paul Thomas Anderson's uh nineteen nine film, or maybe it's it's nine. Okay, So the so quote the best year in recent film history or two seven is that what you argue or other people? Because there will be blood is clearly the best. Um. But two thousand four weirdly has a lot of good movies. In two thousand fourteen has a lot of good movies, and two seventeen. But I know some people say two thousand and seven too because of there will be blood and no country for old man. But that's it. There's really I'm slow. Oh, Spider Man three came out. The more time that goes by, maybe the more I like Spiderman three. You're taught. You're preaching to the choir here. Okay, So we all all adults here on the pot today, all adults here to discuss another film, yes, by another filmmaker with actors production needless to say, sound sound, Oh I see what she did there? Um, this is an extension of what we're improv improvisationally calling the Craft Services Sound Extravaganza. After interviewing disaster piece composer for Vice Wise bodies straight into our interview with today's guest sound mixer, John Pritchett, sound mixer John Purtchett Part this interview. You were there, I was there, John Purtchett was there. We were all present. And this is just part one, Trent, of a two part interview. Or is this us giving away the fact that all of our interviews over Crew the Blues it will be two parters. Yes. Um, we figured that it's more consumable to have it in thirty to forty minute chunks than our and our ten minute long episodes. Um, and preferable to us because we get to buy some more time to get you guys some more interviews. But this is part one. Um, he's really cool. I've edited this half of the episode already. He talks quite a bit about Tom Cruise. Um, that's more to the end. He explains a lot about sound mixing, what it is, how it's different from sound design, specific scenes, how it's changed. Um, specific scenes is next episode. But but this episode, Um, yeah, he talks Oh this he gives the tea and coffee truck story. You've been mentioning that more and more. Yeah, I mean, isn't that just awesome? Isn't that just the cruise of fucking Pulosa. Yes? Yes, So whenever you were, I mean, you're tom cruise in some quassity at all times. But over Halloween has really let you embrace. And so you Pete Maverick Mitchell Halloween and so you've been grabbing a lot of forearms and smiling and moving much faster than usual, all and talking about coffee trucks and top gun and flying planes. In the Magic of the Movies, it's like the driest, deepest throat noise. Then, Oh, we're talking about sound mixer John Pritchett, and I think about just talking with him. I think it's time we just cut to the interview. I'd say it's about time. It's interview o'clock. So I listen. Someone just let me check my watch. Oh look at that. Yeah, no, it five minutes ago. It was five thirty five. But right about now. Interview o'clock que the interview. Hello everybody, and welcome to our interview with John Pritchett. He a three time Academy Award nominated sound mixer...

...behind such films as Dirty Dancing, There Will Be Blood, Avengers, Endgame, and our film for today, Paul Thomas Anderson's Magnolia. Thank you so much for being with us today, pleasure. So, just just to start off, what would you say your relationship with film was at a young age? You know, not very honestly. I kind of got started in the movies a little later, and if I was in the recording studio business for for a long time, and then I was in the TV business for a while before I finally went freelance as a sound engineer sound mixer, doing mostly commercials and industrials and stuff like that. I didn't start doing films until nineteen seventy nine, and I did my very first film, which was a documentary, the only documentary I've ever done in my career, which was I was on the first expedition to find the Titanic m So well did they find? How did that go? We didn't find It was found the two expeditions later by somebody else with the same path we did. We were just at ten miles off uh and they found it. Ballard was his name, Valad Uh, it was quite an adventure, seven seven weeks in the North Atlantic. So what was the first not it was first major motion picture? Was like major? Or like how how did? How did you get more? H like established on set? After that? And then you knew that that's what you wanted to do? Well, you know, I started doing all the things I come from. You're up in Dallas where the film community was. We had a good film business there, or we're not compared to l A. But there were only four people, four guys into the town, which there were sunda and two of them were already doing movies, TV moves and whatever came around. And the other two me and the other fellow there. We did all the other stuff, the commercials, everything, So we didn't really have a chance to do moves until it came along and Uh, I got asked to do this really horrible movie. Uh down in South Texas. Fact, most of us in my community, my friends that we've got our start in this. This movie came out being called the Return of Josie Wales, not the Ballot of Josie Wale. And it was very bad thing that could happen in a movie, happen in the very first movie everywhere everything, and and it was never released. Uh, well they say it was released, but it really what it was, It was four World, which as they put it in a theater so they could claim that it was released. I know, I alayd out to the lawsuits. It was a mess. Uh and that was our first experience, Like it was no worse than this, I guess. So I guess. Like getting into sound mixing itself, I feel like there's a lot of confusion about the difference between sound mixing and sound design and how you know. Especially I think the Academy has now made it one Sound Award and so that creates even further confusion. So if you could just sort of explain what is your job, because I feel like a lot of people don't really know that. My father never did understand what I did. U. Yeah, I am from a location sound mixer for the music for the movie industry, which means that I go on location for everything. Everything is done in the field during the shooting of the movie. That's what all that sound, dialogue, sound effects, music, everything that happens in the field that falls on me and my department, and then our work goes into the hands of post production, sound editorial, sounded sound effects, uh added dialogue a d R. All kinds of that that happens after I'm already off the movie. So I started, they finished, So so I I'm sure there's someone dedicated to holding the boom pole. So are I'm sure are you like watching like the levels or how are you overseeing all of this? What actually do? Yeah? Well, I have I have a mixer or two it's and I have all the microphones come to me mixure. What are the microphones? At least one is always the boom microphone because I have a boom operator who operates at and then if the wireless microphones, they all...

...come into the mixer and I make a mix. But then it also gets all totally separated into ISO tracks of all those different microphones. There. Now that's something that's I'm back when it. But we started to start doing this that didn't that wasn't kind of work. We had had a mono recorder and I made the mix all the microphones, and then post production would have to adjust and fix legs if there were a problem. But our mixed was the VIX I still will do anymore because I just retired. But I still made the mix. Sometimes will be just for dailies. Sometimes it be just so that the editor has knows what's actually there to excuse for before they go back and start using the iPod track. But I try to make it so they don't have to use them. In many cases that's the case, so they don't have to go back to the last tracks they want because it's just more trouble. It takes more time, except on really huge movies, and then they really have to go back because they're in the eight tracks with a tender trail microphones they have, they have to be able to separate them all and come up with their and mix. But all of this, I was one of the first two guys that was doing this. The guy who who really opened my career. I was a director named Laker named Robert Alton. Robert Altman did the same as the movies ever and I had a bunch of movies with him over the years. But he was the one that at the town that was doing this multi track thing. Nobody else was doing it, UH. And so when I was like the third mixer of his, I took it over. I bought some sort of their equipment UH and started doing that the way he wanted it. But he was the only person that wanted to have done. Then after that, I literally got jobs because I hit his name on my resume. Did you see the movie? What didn't matter. They didn't care. I just want to know that I had Robert Alton's name on my resident uh and uh. And it just went from there. Well, now a mushroomed after that into what actually most signers is not really don't like because it's you know, you know, it feel like your son mixing your sound gathering, which is you know, not the same thing. I still make a mix something that can actually listen to it dailys and you know, and see what's what's there? Um, But that's that's that's me in the old style. Guys. Is there more or less crossover than you would think in manipulating audio in the music world and manipulating audio in the movie world. Well, it's just a different kay. I mean, you know, I learned to mix in the recordings to that's that's my start. I'm doing music. Uh. So I was making mixes all the time, you know, constantly during the making mixes for the producer and everybody to hear, etcetera. That's the kind of the world that I came from. I was surprised when I got into the movie industry how many, how few, how people who who are signed mixers had no experience in that at all. Uh, And when it suddenly became the world of digital, they really struggled because it's a big difference with the analog and digital. A lot of guys really struggled with having real problems adapting to that that change. I didn't because I've been doing it already. When did that change? Yeah, Okay, maybe I can't exactly. Before that, I was doing everything just motto ordering analog. I still have that record, but I did. I recorded Durty Dancing on I still have a city of mal I mean that's a famous Yeah you should. Um. So, like, how early into a film's production are you hired? Um? Yeah, comes, Well, it depends on the production. If it's super complicated that I'm hired, you know, maybe a month earlier. But I don't go on staff until maybe two weeks before. There's a lot of prep to do. But most of these are not that way. Most of these are much simpler than that. Yeah, there's multi track stuff that happens, but it's not on the order of Avengers. It's uh like I just did this movie. The last movie I did, any note, was The News of the World. It's Tom Hanks movie that we did it pretty basically, uh you know, not many, not many tracks,...

...maybe one or two tracks. Always on the move, uh rough, rough terrain, rough, hard job for everybody. But it was kind of back to basis. So it varies. It really depends on the the job. Who's you know, how complicated they wanted to be. What does pre production in the sound department look like? Our sound like? You know, that's changed as well. Back in the day, I would go out on all the location scouts to see the locations, to see what problems we were going from counter and have some input is that we might have to do to treat that room or that place for the for the sound or the echo and and everything, or find out what the train schedule was so we could shoot through the railroad tracks, all kinds of stuff like that. I was involved in that, but over the years that kind of went away because there are times wouldn't allow and budgets sometimes not allow for that. For the location managers and I got to be really close, like to talk to location manager was out there doing it, and he would tell me what's going on, and then I would make my comments and or ahead anything. But I also would know kind of what's coming up, and that was important, uh to me. But they the other one is literally, as a matter of budget on smaller films, if they can get away with not taking the set mix from locations to guts, they're happy about that. They do want to take a few people as they can because the locations guts become very pedious and time consuming. All I have so answer your question, I think it might have been bombing in pre production in the past. I'd say ten years was a lot less than it was. Um So, Trent and I both go to film school, and I had a professor who basically said that, like onset sound recording has sort of exponentiated with the amount of stuff that you're getting. Was I kind of just wondering, like, do you yeah, because you're getting so much more you're you're you're getting like eight track X or something, do you think that well, you're having to deal with that. I guess like, is that actually more helpful? Like is it eight times more helpful to have as much or do you think that sometimes people get lost in that it's easy to make it overcomplicated. And the fact that mostly the Sundaches that I know of today are very tick heavy. You know that they that that's exploded a lot bigger, more equipment, more microphones, more of this, more of that. Uh And so I mean in the end, I was carrying thirty pounds of equipment on every job, and he's got it. The guys are doing more than that now. Uh, customized sound cards and even customized equipment. Uh. It's it became well for me, it became blessed and less fun because it was it was too much. It was just tech tech tech. Uh And and vertically, basically my world was not about that. I'm more about trying to relate to the actors and understand what the director wants and you know, and and take care. You had to protect the editor, because that's what I've always said, particularly editor, make sure that they don't get screwed by something I do or didn't. Uh. So answered that, I think so. Transitioning into our movie of the week, Magnolia, Um that you've worked with Paul Thomas Anderson several times, but Magnolia was the first time, and we were wondering, how how did you get on the project? How were we introduced? Well? He tried to even try to hire me. For a while, I didn't know who he was, but he was a big fan of Robert Altmans. Uh. He became Robert Altmins to stand by director on a few things toward the end of Proberts to the end of his career because he was unassuable. His health was so bad, so Paul would go and he would be there with him in case. But he also Paul liked the way Altman did his did what he did. He liked all the actors, and so he would try to hire the actors and the crew and where we could get So he tried to hire me for a Heard Aide, which was his first movie, and I didn't know him. He didn't know me, and sport that I didn't even know coming up. Then they tried to hire me for Boogie Nights. Uh and the editor who was...

...it was really good for him, he said, I even I want to do this, I'm like why. I didn't ready to read the script, so I didn't even know what I was getting into. I wish I had done it. I left everybody in that I know all of those people and it would have been great. So that he did third time as the charm. He got me to do Uh, Magnolia and Uh. And that was a stuper incredibly challenging movie because the way we did it, we're shooting or shooting, we shooting shooting a music video at the same time we're doing the movie, and then there's that song that plays throughout the music which is kind of part of the music video. It was weirder than I they were done. Uh. And it was in that sense, it's quite in trouble because Paul is one of those directors you wish they were all like him, because he speaks to actors. He knows how to talk to actors. He's not an actor, but he got that grow with him and he just you know, they understand each other and therefore he's able to communicate to people like me what he wants and I'm seeing and I talk to him about it. How do we do this? What do we do to make you better? Uh? And so in that sense, I love working with it because you felt like you're a collaborator rather than just doing somebody's biding. So I was In preparation for the interview, I was going through the movie again and I found that, like, rain is like pervasive throughout the movie, and I was wondering, like is that something that you had conversations about or like how to really think about and was it all rain? It was it all rain towers that imagine in that movie. Yes, but the things you also you have to consider very shooting inside or outside, And if you're shooting outside, you have to consider what the rain is hitting, what kind of noise is it's gonna make, what it's gonna drip off the roof and a huge flashy noises in the bubbles, and you can treat those bubbles because inside then you treat the roof or you treat something so you minimize the sound of the brain hitting the roof. And then if they need more that you record a wild track for them whatever the rain really is. And then they used to add on to the sound. But yes, it was a big consideration because as you said, there's a lot of it in there. Um So in ag case, we had to you know, worked with again with the actors to remind them that this is a very noisy scene and they may need to adjust. A lot of times actors do not want to adjust, especially for sound. Uh. So it requires having some kind of a relationship. And if I tell them what I think it's gonna we need because it's gonna help them, they have a choice. They can accept my advice or not. And if they accepted then it goes one way. And if they don't except it. And I'm in constant communication with the directors that here's what's happening or what's not happening, what do you want to do about it? And maybe they don't want to do anything, so we just work with what they give us. You know. It's like the scene and the scene that movie where they're one of the characters is in a car crying and try and singing that song, and it's a live microphone. Those are all live maybe new to pre record anything except the music is uh. And so we had to work with a way to hear her and hear the sound of the rain. And it took a little bit of work to get those two things kind of balanced out. Fortunately, that actress is wonderful to work with and she just did whatever you need for Uh. It's a conversation always. This is more just like a general nerd um question. But how on set did the frogs from the sky operate? Yeah, well, there weren't any frogs. Uh there they were all Uh, well I should take that. I think that there were some a few of a few frogs. One scene with actually threw these rubbers silicony gooey frogs. Most of their throwing down markers. There are the markers hit and that's where they're gonna put it in post. They're seen in the swimming pool. There are all kinds of gadgets and the swimming boiling water all over the place, blowing the umbrella all that. That's all done as a special effects gag. And then the frogs were added added later at uh. Just...

...to circle back with like the Rain does the same go like this movie has a lot of like dialogue and music happening like simultaneously, And does that affect how you go about recording. If it's in the script that there's going to be music playing over the top, for sure, we have to work with the composer of the music coordinator and figure out what we're gonna do, whether it's playback full playback locals and everything, or it's going to be playback of the track or instrument, and the vocal is live. Uh. And in some combination of those things like did you see the movie that thing you do the Tom Hanks film. I haven't seen it. I've been told it's ape. It's mostly all playback of the music. Music is great, it's all original music in the style of the era that is in. But a lot of stuff in balls, live microphones, going from from playback to live mic, playback alive, back back and forth. Uh. And that requires a real coordination with everybody, props department, you know, set decorator, all these everything work to have a piece system that you can even have in the picture use it as a pretty actual video visual thing. Uh. And then the the actors. The great thing. Have you ever see the movie? The actors aren't singing, well, they're they're singing, but they're terrible singers. And all that's pre recorded, and so I have to be able to bring the vocals in and out of the of the mix that they're hearing out there on the on the set. Uh. And then of course the audience is having to react to some particularly dancing, all kinds of stuff. A lot of times we will have one or two people in the extras will have hidden earphones and they'll keep the beat answering, So what's everybody else keys off of them? Because we can't have they're they're talking less that if you've got actual live microphones to record, that's kind of tricky. But in Magnolia there's a lot the singing is all live, no play back, but just we would play back on a speaker and down in the in the car someplace close by. I think in one occasion we actually put a thing in somebody's ears, but mostly it was just low, low music and they would say, you know, perform a lot. So we're talking about Magnolia because I'm a huge Tom Cruise fan and this is part of a three part cruise of Palooza. We're calling it um and so I wanted to ask uh. In talking with you, it seems like you have to have to talk with the actors, like what was Tom Cruise? Like Tom was one of those promis that is as a dream to work with it. I mean, he's so sharp and he's so indefatigable. I mean, and some of the season there you know on the scene with what he's talking, he's going doing the video things. Doing a video we did, I would say we did sixty takes in a row NonStop. Never complained, nothing like some actles getting really nasty about stuff like that. He was just right on target the whole time, very generous to the crew. Just a really great guy to work with. You have to ignore some things about it. If he starts talking religion, but uh but we was talking about that on set, or was just like in general. Okay, I mean you just have to know that if he does he just said to walk away. Uh, but he doesn't. Really, He's very cognitive of all that sort of stuff. Uh. I would Yeah, Yeah, I loved working And that was a shot a month of nights on that on that he bought. He bought a coffee and tea truck every night. I just took a place like that. And you said that you shot that the the videotape for sixty takes? Was that like the way p t A Was shooting? Like was that like a common thing or was something going well? Because it was video, there was no reason to stop and reload the Paul shots on film. Primarily a lot of that show was shot...

...on film, but all that video stuff was all shot video. It was all shot, you know, the the game show. That was all but they basically said an entire video operation and a film operation we shot simultaneous. So we shot it, you know, like we had like a film and like like the TV show, all live cameras all that stuff. Was like, um, but that was unusual. As I said Paul, like he really really works in film. And are there I mean, you spoke about the scene where I think it's Julianne Moore was in the car um but are there any particular scenes where like this was a challenge and you look at the final film and you're like, wow, I'm really proud of how that all got put together that you can remember. I know it was a while back at this point. Well, the game shows. The Game show was very shot, actually the opening scene in them, but it was really shot the steadicam shot when boy and the father come in for the game show for there that game what you Know, Kids Know or whatever it is, what do Kids Know? We shot that at CBS Studios in l A. And it started out in the rain out in the parking lot and followed the inside the building that a long hallway and these guys are talking the hallway, and at some point they stood up and the boy goes with the girl into the green room and the father goes in the direction some somewhere else, and then we followed the camera and then we come back around and we go outside again, out of the green room and out to an elevator, and they get on the elevator and talking the hallway, and then they go up in the elevator to an earth floor and they get out of that. They're still talking and go into an office. And that was a booger. I mean, that was like so hard because radio waves don't work well and buildings like that, so that was a challenge to beginning using using words microphol is very uh. But the we were actually all the state shops were like that. The game showing. There's a bigger shot in the game show where they come from the from the dressing room uh onto to the stage where the setting up for the game show. We did so many taps of that. We went through three steady camop right. He just wore out. He just couldn't do it anymore because it's all upstairs and all kinds of stuff. So it was physically very challenging. Uh, so he he likes stuff like that. He likes that because he likes so much of all of them stuff. You've ever seen the opening shot? Have you ever seen the movie The Player? Oh? Wait, I think that that would They showed It's it's a very long take, like going through a bunch of buildings and it's like Hollywood people talking. Am I crazy? Yeah? I know that, I know that you're talking about. It was at the time, and for the longust time, the longest opening seen of any movie. He was eleven minutes, because that's how long a film role was. Uh, And we shot it and you can see it here. Go see h you worked on that movie? Yeah, it's the guy from Shawshank Redemption. What's his name? Yeah? Yeah, that that was quite an experience that This is probably a simple when you're doing a really long take like that, do you have a boom operator like running behind the operation or is it livelier mix? It's all it's all your love. I mean, we plant we plant microphones sometimes sometimes just one boom, sometimes too. Uh, it just depends. Every scene has its own requirements. That particular opening scene we end up using fifteen wireless micro And so are you like planting microphones were like key pieces of dialogue or something are going to be delivered. Yeah, yeah, a lot of time. If you ever seen that. The opening, it starts off with you for people coming out of an office building and walk across the parking lot. They're talking, and then they passed by. Some other people come in the other direction and they're talking, so we go with them, and it eventually goes up and into Tim Tim Robber's office and you hear him talking to somebody, and then it leaves that opposite it goes to another office and can then go to run in a big circle. Uh. And in except old people in the parking lot,...

...they're all talking all the time. Uh. And it got so to the point where at the time there weren't that many wireless microphones out there, I mean that you could choose from he could. It was really hard to run more than a few together for lots of technical reasons. So but that day he just kept he just kept adding people, adding people. He started to see and I said, how many people are gonna be speaking on wires? And he said, oh, for maybe four people, And she kept he kept growing and growing and growing. So by the end of the day on the shot the scene on Sunday, I was calling friends. He got a wire. He was going to get wors microphones you bring and they would bring him over. And we've had him and we've set him in shrubs uh and just where we can get him. And it finally ran out and Bob added one more line. I said, Bob, we don't have any more while its mica uh And he said, what came you doing? So he actually came up with the idea. And in the scene there's a person of the clipboard and they're talking to somebody next to him and then they believe the scene. And then later on you see this guy leading a group of people across the parking line and he's talking. He's got, he's got. So we just put the microphone on the clipboard. So when he passed it all he gave to the other person and he's on that. Now that's what we do it. Wow, Trent, what an interview and to think it's only part one. Um, thanks again to John Pritchett so much for talking with us. UM next week We've got he's got some cool stories from other sets he's been on. Talks about Avengers Endgame, talks a little Terrence Malick. Um, A little bit everything, Yeah, a little bit of everything. It's almost like when you come home from treating on Halloween night before a candy bag. Yeah, the references are going to be so stale by the time. Isn't that so sad on fire? Well? Yeah I don't. I was complimenting you on your use of stale as in terms of candy rather than I was reacting. I think these comments are timeless. Okay, but uh, part more. You know what's getting stale us talking this episode? Okay, you're not wrong, But before we go part, It's Halloween night. You're in like sixth grade, you're turks treating with your friends. You knock on the door, ring the doorbell, someone opens it, They extend candy bowl. You look inside. What are you reaching for? I do love kit Cat mm hm. I do like sour Patch kids, um. And I think a sleeper hit um. I've been seeing this on TikTok a lot about sleeper builds of men that are muscular but don't look like their muscular when they were wearing clothes, And I feel like the crunch Bar for me is like a sleeper hit of um. Candy bars. I really enjoyed them, but I feel like nobody talks about them. A Bunch of Crunch might be my favorite all time movie snack. I love bunch of Crunch for for a movie. I'm not kidding. Why are we Are you looking at me like this? It's because you seem so enthusiastic that I thought it was artificial and that you were just trying it just because I'm Tom Cruise. Now, next week you can look forward to our second to the second part of this interview. Um. Again, some cool stuff there. Thanks for listening to this one. You'll love the next one. In the week after that, we'll do our discussion and um that will be that for Magnolia but exciting times. Yeah, this is only the beginning of bluism. Um. You can go listen to us on Apple podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon podcasts, wherever you get, wherever you and on the podcasts that allow you to leave reviews or...

...ratings. Please do so and preferably a positive one part. The one person that gave us a four star review go fund yourself. Do you know who that is? Really? No? Um? Oh yeah, it goes on Spotify. Yeah, because we have like a four point eight. Yeah, kind of fucked. But we also have social media Instagram, Twitter. We post funny things, funny cool, funny cool things, funny cool, funny cool, um and you can go check us out there. Other than that, I think we're good to go, Trent, you have office hours to go to. You have I would say, a train to catch. But is it a trend? I think I'm taking an uber part close enough that it only costs like twenty bucks. Part you have an uber you have a car to catch? Yeah? Go? Is that you? Yeah? I don't know if the mike caught it, but there was a there was a sound Hong Kong cars outside, which I'll add a honk sound. Now I don't have to oh true. Alright, bye guys.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (118)