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Episode 84 · 6 months ago

LAST NIGHT IN SOHO (2021) with Set Decorator Judy Farr

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent talk Last Night in Soho with its set decorator Judy Farr. They also reconcile after last week's argument.

Edited by Parth Marathe

We are tonight's entertainment. You can't handle the true the fire risals pizza time. You're a wizard, Harry. So, you know, you think that's where you're breathing. Proving I don't have friends, I strew the suits. So, Trent, what have you been eating recently? So parth, hello, you're looking well. Thank you. It's nice to be so chipper again after I guess what we can call the Batman incident? Moving forward. Oh Yeah, the Batman brings out the best in the worst in us. Let's just say it showed that we truly are unstoppable forces and immovable objects. You know. Yeah, what did I have? I had some chocolate cookies that I baked. They're delicious. What are you young about? You? Yeah, no, was it? Was it from scratcher? Was it a box? Sir, it was a box. added some butter and some eggs. So I can give myself some credit, but not too much. We delcioso, no flour, no sugar. Oh is that Pok us? When you all, as Drake COMPANYA would say? We were just talking about drake bell off the air, because I have been binging drake and Josh on, my friend from High Schools Hulu Account. Part I think Hulu and Netflix are the only streaming services where I'm on someone's account that isn't your parents. I have. Oh, and Disney plus. I'm on someone else's, I think. Don't you only have Hbo Max? I have your Hrem Max and I'm on your itunes account. So that's Labine, my laptop. Of the loferr movies. Wow, that's awesome. That's a lot of movies, but I'm on. I mean, if anyone's hearing this feels called out, feel free to send me a text. Michael from down the hall, I have his Disney plus. Got Jonathan, you free from High School, his Hulu. Nathaniel Johnson got his netflix. I had your apple TV for a little. Oh and your Voodoo did. Yeah, well, my Boodoo and my itunes are kind like linked, so it's kind of one in the same. But yeah, I guess I can send your parents a card or something on on father's Day or something. Yeah, I if you, if you did the math, I would probably owe them a good amount of cumulative money. Yeah, I mean all that Sopranos you've been seeing, guys, it's a lot. Yeah, so part world have you been eating. It was a nice at today. Got Up to like seventy one degrees here in Bridgewater, and so my dad decided to fire up the grill. Bly, Whoa, who the grill. No, the what. What he put on it? Well, we're in on beef eating household. So we put a chicken, some shrimp and some veggies and sure, oh, and and it's delicious, isn't sure? Sounds like it. And you are. You're filled to the brim now and ready to all failed. Boy. Yeah, yeah, I'm ready. I'm ready for some last night and Soho, like, if somebody were to like take us into like its last night and Soho interview, that be amazing. Do you know anybody that could do that? Like past Trenton parth, like a month a month ago, Trent and part who did all the work of conducting this interview and a future trend Parth, can just casually introduce it. I guess it's time. Let's que the intra. Welcome back to craft services, where we talk about the movies each week. We talked about a film and hopefully have a crew member of that film to talk with us about their experience working on the picture. Who Do we have on this week we had judy far she was a set decorator for last night and Soho, among many other movies that we end up talking about. She has a lot of cool stories and she ended up telling us that she worked on a certain picture that was not on her IMDB and you're going to to listen to the interview and then listen to future part and Trent talk about what it was. Wait, we're only going to say that at the end of the episode. Should we give a tease about WHO's WHO's? I think we should. Who It involves? Well, I guess, since it is not in the entirety of the interview, we can say that off the air. What movie did we reference? We definitely reference to say, in the cubrick movie. And then she said something, something, something, by the way. Now I well, we were talking. We were talking about, although we know we're talking about she'd worked on and like how they've been crazy, like she'd worked on...

...some crazy sets. And then wasn't that how we got in? I know, I kind of. I mean, maybe I'm wrong because it was from a month ago, but I almost think it was because we were talking about directors who'd never won best director. Oh, you know, you're right, you're right here. And I said something, something, Sandy Kubright doesn't have any Oscars, and then she said I would a crazy what a crazy little dude. And she worked on she worked on Ice Wat shut. And here's the juiciest part. She said that Stanley Kubrick was a very short man, shorter than the Internet would indicate if you looked up how tall he was. Yeah, but our instagram will reveal a juicy piece of information that you'll just have to hang on for. Yeah, so I guess, without further Ado, enjoy the episode, right, right, yeah, we've got we kind of have like after Scott Pilgrim, we took a little detour with bat man. Now we're back in like an edgar right corner sort of. Yea, our month long I was not planned. No happy accident. Yeah, actually, wait, this was recorded wave before a month ago. This is but recorded actually, I think, before our Scott Pilgrim episode was recorded. Time is all relative part. Yeah, you could have told me this interview. I don't know, fifteen minutes ago. I would have I would have believed you. I'm just yeah. Well, with that being said, I think we should cut into the interview yeah, I think we should find sich solid ground, recorded at an unknown time in an unknown place with unknown parties. Yeah, we really have no idea what we're cutting. We hope enjoy it. There really could be some horrible noises. It could just be in it could be industrial sounds for an hour. You know, wait, part you know you're going to have to edit in some crazy sounds, like right before we start asking judy far very insightful questions. We'll see. We'll see about that. But let's just say youtube to empty three converter is a very powerful tool. Part did you know at least my my chosen youtube MP three converter has been removed in the United States and now I have to a different? Why? Now I've used a different one? I feel like it's kind of an era to say. I think we were using the same watton and the the first for search result. Yeah, I've gone under the second search result, which happens to we're just as well. Yeah, but anyways, whatever you're about to listen to, enjoy. We don't know. Hello, everybody, and welcome to our interview with Judy Far. She's the Oscar nominated set director that's worked on such films as the king speech, rocket man, the last all and our film for today, last night and Soho. Thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you for asking me. So, just to start off, what was your relationship with film at Young Age? I absolutely loved watching films. When I was a kid we used to have BBC two, which on a Saturday and a Sunday at three o'clock they'd have like a matinee and it would always be those black and white movies with Frank Sinatra or gene Kelly, or it will be the you know, buzzby Berkeley or something like that, and I used to just go in there, draw the curtains and just sit and watch films. Love Them. My favorite first film I ever was taken to in a cinema was Mary poppins, which was amazing, and I think the second one I went to see in the cinema was hitty Judy Bang Bang. So both of them were my favorite films. A Chili Do Bang Bang, especially because it was just an amazing film. Chitty Chili Bang Bang was a big movie on when I was a kid as well and tasty, absolutely fantastic film, and I got the kids to watch all those sort of films as well when they were little, because I thought if they don't see them, they won't understand what made me want to go and be what I am. So that's that's like the main reason to have children. It's just to show them your foundational films, yes, and then just to watch their face. But so how did you first get involved in the film industry and like find yourself on set for the first time? Well, I went to art college, so I did a degree in theater design because over in the UK they didn't have anywhere to go to do film design. So I went to do that, finished my degree and started working in the theater. I got a job at the BBC, which was just amazing because the BBC was just a powerhouse of learning. They broadcast, you know, they were the people that used to train everybody, and I was there for a few years and but I didn't want to stay there. I...

...wanted to do big films. They just finished filming who killed Roger Rabbit opposite the BBC. It was like an old, scruffy bit of land in west London and they built one of the big sets out there and used to park in the Multi Story Car Park at the BBC and then I'd go over to the other side of the car park and I'd stand there for ages just watching them, going I'm going to do that one day. I'm going to go and work on a great big film like that. So, Um, so, yeah, I left the BBC and went free launce and just hoped that I would get work. So and I did. So how did you sort of like get your big break into like set decorating, because that seems to be kind of like what you do. Yeah, so, so, basically there was only one way in with the unions and things. You had to either just go straight in as an assistant set decorator or you could be a production by, which, you know, they're both very closely linked, and I thought, well, you know, if I'm if I'm leaving the BBC as a production by as well go and dry myself as a production bar in the film industry. So I did get a few jobs and and then I then joined up with a couple of friends of mine who had been at the BBC, Chris Seegers, who's now a very well known production designer, and Jim Clay, again very well known production designer, and and they offered me my first job as a set decorator. So that was it was with David Putnam down in southern Ireland and it was called or of the buttons, which was a fabulous film to do because it was just wild, mad children running around and stealing tractors and crashing through things and doing stuff. So it was just it was a great film to start my my career off with and and that's what I've been doing ever since. Can you explain the basic, I guess, distinction between a said what are the response abilities of a said decorator besides decorating the set and like what a said Dresser does also? Yeah, so we were set decorator, is the person who's responsible for the look of the film, the person who chooses, you know, if someone's writing, you know, they choose the book the person's writing, they choose the pain, they choose the glasses, they choose the lighting, the wall paper, furniture, everything. We go and choose those things and we work with the production designer and to give the character that you know, whose room we're now designing, to give it the style that it needs for the story. So obviously, if it's an old man sitting in an old Victorian chair. You don't give him some groovy modern, you know, notebook. It's you know, it's sort of works its way that you you understand the character and it is very much character led. Sometimes the the actors have a little bit to say about stuff, but not very often. They usually fairly happy with what's given to them. As long as you're doing the job properly, I think that's that's fine. And then a we call a set dresser is we have. It's slightly different than the states, as it is to hear our set dresser in the states is what we call a dressing prop man or woman. So they basically load all the props and move them and put them into the places where I asked them to put them so and they'll fix the door furniture and they'll fix the window fittings, put the pictures up on the walls and things like that. So so that's really the difference between the two jobs. So how do you get involved with last night and so, because that seems like a pretty like coveted job. I know because I hadn't worked with Edgar before, but I'd worked with Marcus the production designer before. We done rocket man together. That was the first job done together. We've now done five films together, which is amazing. And all we got on really well and he just said right, we're doing this job and you want to come and do it. So so yeah, I mean I read the script and I was slightly confused about it, but I, you know, went through it again and then it sort of made sense and we started designing the sets and looking at the characters and and everything and and so that's really how I ended up doing it, which was really nice because all the producers, they are all work together before, the production managers, everybody. So it was quite a sort of knit, close knit team, which was nice to join. So, Edgar, it seems like a very specific director and how much direction were you given on how to decorate the sets and like what sort of conversation to did you have with the production designer about what you were going for? So well, Marcus and I, as I say, get on quite well...

...and we've sort of got like a thing between this way you just know what's right and what's wrong. And obviously Diana Riggs set was the first set that we built and decorated. You know, we certain talked about it we'd look at the colors, the wall papers, you know, the the fireplaces, whether it originally he just wanted a wooden floor and I kept saying, Oh no, let's put some carpet down. She's an old lady, she'd have carpet. No, no, no. Anyway, eventually we did put carpet down. It just wasn't rist but you know, the light fittings, we purchased pretty much everything in that whole set because, well, I'm not going to say what happens to the house, but we can't do certain things to hired props. So we had to purchase them and and it was great fun. We spent a lot of time out shopping and spending money and I think it looked quite good. I think her set was really interesting sort of mixture of the siders and a bit of present day as well. Yeah, we talked with some of the storyboard artist son Scott Pilgrim vers of the world, and they said that one of the good things about working with their great is that he's really good at like showing the workpeople have put in, and so I kind of wanted to ask you, because there's so many shots that are like some are like one takes, but there's just so many like really cool shots that show off the set. Yeah, and like all these little details, and so to that put like extra pressure on you? Or is it just like, well, it had to be good. Anyways, I'm just glad that they're shooting it this way. That's how I always put it. If if I haven't done a good job, I would think he probably wouldn't take a picture of it, but I'm hoping that it's good enough and it would in. It looks good. So he does want to do a little still life of it. He his brother actually works as a sort of sexual artist. We interviewed him. Oh, did you? He's lovely asn't yeah, he's real nice. Yeah, he was what he was one of the three story world artist we talked to. Yeah, he's absolutely lovely. He worked actually in our art department, so we all got to know him really well. And they are very different. You know, Oscar's far more outgoing and and and Edgar's very definitely focused on on what he's doing at that time and he'll feed that through markers, who's done a lot of films with and his brother. So so he was very much totally concentrating on what he was doing and just trusting his heads of department and people to make sure it was right. Yeah, so a few of those specifics within the movie that from a set decorating standpoint, I thought you might have some court insight too, were like all the reoccurring mirrors, and I know like I saw some behind the scenes footage and obviously they would have, you know, Thomas Mckenzie on one side and then I'll need tell a drawing and a fake mirror, and that was awesome. If you could just speak on that. It was so confusing. I used to get onto what, you know, if it was the cafe royal or whatever, whatever the set was, and then somebody wuld say, but we're taking that bit out and then we're putting a mirror that does this, but you don't see that. You only see that and then you go over here and that comes out and it was like, Oh, what are we doing now? And Luckily, as I say, Marcus was totally on what was going on with that. I mean we obviously provided all those things, but there were times when I honestly, and I know that my team were the same. We used to stand there and go what's happening. How is that going to happen? You know, we'd be taking floorboards out or ceilings out or and putting things in, and then they'd be shooting this way or that way, or another war would come out and and suddenly you'd be shooting a reflection of this. But this is modern day and this is period, so everything had to be exactly the same. It was just it was quite complicated and and a bit confusing, especially for some of the reverse shouts, for like the male counterpart would have a real reflection. You know, I know, I know, and it was. It really really was it. They'd spend a lot of time working it all out. It really did take them a lot of time and it was. It was fairly slow when they were doing all those things, especially up in the attic, in the bedroom, which really I mean that changed. You know, every day we'd have something. We'd take a bathroom away and then suddenly there be a new bathroom in, or we we moved so the kit so the bedroom would be days and the kitchen would be modern day or, you know, through that door it would be. So we really were kept on our toes. I lost one of my prop makers Tom who who actually just ended up...

...on set because every time they needed something, he was just pulling something apart, remaking it, putting it all back together. So he ended up as sort of Marcus has, sort of right hand man towards the end of the film, and we were pulling the things apart and putting all these mirrors and different things in. So very, very complicated. Yeah, I mean you kind of talked about a little bit, like I wanted to ask you, but like the period aspect of it, like from a set decorator point of view, if you're in charge of putting all that stuff together, like how much of that is like you taking things in trying to make them look like they're period accurate, and like how much of that was like finding actual things from like s? I think pretty much most of it was s stuff. Obviously some of the fabrics weren't, but but it was it because of the reflections of everything. So you had one type of curtain or you had one type of wallpaper or one time. You know, we didn't want to make them really different, but we didn't want to make them close, so close to each other you didn't notice that they'd changed. So again we painted and wallpapered a few times before we got those things right. But yeah, there's an amazing company in the UK that, and I know there's one in the states I've used them before, that has genuinely old wallpaper. So you could just go and buy these roles of wall paper that are practically falling apart and the painters hate it. Anyone on set who gets told to put it up, they're all just like and I don't give me that stuff because you have to cut the edges where they had their little salvages and they hate it. But it always looks really good because it has a definite style and a sort of Matt Finish and, you know, very deep good colors to it. So, so, so, yeah, most of it was s stuff. Another future we were curious about was like all the hands through the walls and like hands through the bed and also like the ghost men, like and they're weird, like d effect, if you had have any insight on how any of that was done, just because there's so much practical effects in this movie and they're all so impressive and they were practical effects everything. That's what I said. When Thomas got pinched to go on to set, he would be taking the the mattress apart and the hands would be coming through the mattress. Suddenly we'd be told we need some more mattresses because this mattress, Thomas has just cut twenty five holes in it, and you know, and that next thing is the carpets been ripped up. He's put holes through the carpets as well. And I didn't have a lot to do with it, basically because we would have been getting ready a lot of other sets. So we left them with their at their special effects department and with markers and with Edgar and and also Oscar, because he really worked out how all those shadow men were going to work within that, within those scenes. But they are really scary as well, aren't they? I mean I was like when I watched it, I was really surprised that it was so scary. That is something that we've learned from talking through to several production designers this point. Those will be like toss about like this awesome scene in this like awesome place that you decorated, and they're like, I can only really speak on the decorations because when they are shooting, I was decorating the next place. Yea Yeah, and there you're always one step ahead of the production. Yeah, we are normally one step ahead. Hopefully we are. We're not doing that still while they're trying to shoot it. Sometimes that does happen because they change their minds, but but you try to keep at least one set ahead of them so that we're we've got a bit of time to change things and move stuff around and and make sure it's right. So like towards the end of the film there's like a huge fire that happens, and you've just said it. I didn't say it earlier this this thing's going to be coming out and like a Deprong, very gay. have no excuse. Okay, no, it okay, yeah, the big Laire I have. I just wanted to know, like, from a set decorating point of view, I doubt that you were there when that happened and what I actually was at the studio when they did start that fire, and Steve, who's the special effects designer, who's lovely chat who again has worked with Marcus a lot and work with Edgar before, obviously had lots of fire bars wre they put in. So it looks like everything's on her, but then marcus just got carried away. I said it's not enough, it's not enough, and he was like throwing gel onto the set because everything had been purchased. We knew we could burn it and we filmed it at a really old studio in London, at Ealing Studios, which is which I think was probably one of the is one of the oldest studios in London. It was just set up in the one thousand nine hundred and fifteen, something like that, one thousand nine hundred and twenty. So they'd used to make silent films there and everything is would. Wooden floors, wooden walls,...

...wouldn't. Everything wouldn't, Gantrus at the top, wooden fire door, everything is would. And we were watching Marcus and it was like you're mad, you like a paramaniac, and everything was being burned. He was throwing the Fire Gel on everything. Even Steve Sort of stood back and went, Whoa, Marcus, you're really going to make a mess here it was. It was really big flames and big fire, but obviously the I fi'm Al was standing around to make sure that nobody got hurt in the studio didn't get burnt down. I guess how long was the shoe on all. You know, I can't remember. I think it was probably about it's normally I normally start a job and and most films are for me with my prep or about five to six months. So you get ten to twelve weeks prep, depending on how big the film is. I mean obviously some of the huge films they take people on for, you know, months before they start filming, but I don't like doing those sort of films because they're just like they're just too big and then you don't get involved in actually making the film because you're just another person in the whole sort of process. So yeah, it's not me about five to six months of work. So I would say probably we're maybe maybe three months of filming. So is your preproduction like buying materials or like doing like a look book or just like everything? Yeah, so, I mean I literally started this job on Monday. I'm reading a script, but I'd read it before, but now they've just shortened it and done some of the things. I'm doing lists for our prop makers, I'm doing list for our buyers, I'm I'm I've pulled out loads of books earlier to as reference for people to see how I think it should look. I spent. I've spent a couple of days with the designer now, so I pretty know what I'm doing, bringing people about cars and talking to the boat people, because obviously it's a big boat thing. So, yeah, it's everything. It's getting it's looking at the schedule, it's spending that time making sure you're doing everything in a chronological order, otherwise you just getting a mess. So once you've got your schedule, your work on the sets coming up first, leaving the end bit to the end, you know, and, just as you say, purchasing look books, all of those things so that everybody knows what we're doing. So, like when you get attached to a job, do you personally like seek out projects that you find will be interesting, or is it that you kind of have like a working relationship with production designers and then they like, what will happen? What happened with last night and Soho? I guess, yeah, it just depends. I mean, I'm working with with a lady who I'd never met before. She's come over here, it says she did made of honor and she so she'd worked over here before and she wanted somebody to come and do this job and it's very busy over in the UK at the moment and the person she took on as her super using art director rang me. Knew I was finishing a job and so that's how I got that job. And mostly is word of mouth. I think as you get older, and you can see I am very old, I think you just do get to know so many people, product producers, production managers, the art directors that and if it is somebody coming from abroad, then whoever's been picked up as their supervising art director, it's pretty lightly I would know them. So so that's, yeah, normally how I get work. I don't have an agent. So yeah, that's how it has so like. Trent, do you have any other last night? So her questions so close out clause out last ANSO. So I wanted to ask you about another movie that you worked on. Ye came out in two thousand and twenty, one that I recently watched like a few days ago, that I loved and it was the last all. Yeah, I wanted to ask what was that like? What's really Scott like? That was one of those films that you start and you think, well, it's obviously going to be absolutely brilliantly organized and marvelous, and then you start and it and then nothing happens, and then you do a budget and then nothing happens, and then you do a budget and and then suddenly everything goes Ridley, turns up and it's all all all guns blazing. We we started the ELM in in Dublin and we...

...had a an Irish crewer there who were preparing for the second part of the film, which is all the duel and all the fighting and a and all the big battles and things. And we started off going to France. So the the Irish crew got, you know, like six months prep on the job. I got three months prep to go and get France done, but I also in that three months, had to get Dublin done. So, as you can imagine, it was it was madness. And you know what three months we had? We had our Christmas break and the day before we were going back to Dublin I tripped and fell on my leg and broke my leg. So I ended up in a wheelchair in France being pushed up cobbled hills to castles and down, you know really steep hills, down into boggy, muddy it was. It was awful. It was awful and it was January and February much. It was rainy, it was cold, you know, it was all the things that you could possibly think of. The worst things where the broken leg. But so by the time I got back to Dublin I was fine. And then we had covid so we all got sent home literally three days before we were about to start shooting. So which gave us then five months off. We didn't start again till the July and and then sort of had to try and remember what we've been doing because, you know, that time off was a bit mad. It was it was like we'd all gone into sort of like this is quite nice being at home and doing the gardening and not going out and just sitting in the garden and and and then to try and get your head back into what you were doing five months previous to that. That was all at like high speed. And what I was worried about was because we dressed all these sets over and in the studios in Dublin and we left them and I saying what, you know, they've got holes in the studio walls. It's all quite old. And I was saying, you know we're going to have animals in there eating all the fabrics and we'll have pigeons in there, you know, making a mess over everything. Anyway, we got back and it was actually it was just dusty, but it was like opening the doors. It's like open the doors and walk in and get oh, that's what we were up to. So yeah, it was it was a it was a hard job, that job. It was hard work, but it was a it was a good film. I I think it's subject matter was fantast and jody Cooma was fantastic and I it was a I enjoyed it. I think not enjoy it because it's not I enjoyed the look of it. Yeah, that's like a beautiful looking film. HMM. Thank you. So another movie you worked on is American sniper by Clint Eastwood, and it says that you were specifically in Morocco. Yeah, we did the whole thing in Morocco. Well, some of it. They did a bit in the states. We I was out doing all the all the sort of terrorists and the fight fighting and all the all the rubble and the broken down streets and all the terrorists sort of hideouts and things, which was amazing. It was the second time I'd work with Clint actually and and I and I just before we finished I did mention to him I had worked for him and it was like thirty years previously. So it was just like, you know, I did that job with you and now doing that one now. It was great. It was a really good, good job to do. I enjoyed that very much because it again character led, you know, and but doing it within a sort of Arabic style, which was really interesting. He very famous. Only does like one or two ticks right, oh, totally, he gets everything is set up by one of his co producers. It's amazing. It is all set up, everything's done, the camera men know what they're doing and the DP does his lighting and they do all the rehearsals and then he comes in and he'll just do yeah, so to so. Do you like that? Because, like it keeps you moving and keeps you going to the next saying so quick. It's brilliant, because then nobody get no, you know, you can't get bored because you're on, not on. Take Twenty five of somebody picking up a book and going you doing that yeah, which really is if you are stuck on the set and that happens. It's some it is it's tiring, but then in under syndrome. Yeah, but then really scots like that. You know he has he has four or five cameras on set every day and which is a...

...nightmare because if you got five people in a camera team and you've got five cameras, you've got you've got twenty more people in a set then you're normally used to. Or if you may have two cameras, but and he has them, are shooting at the same time. He sets to all up, everybody's doing what they're supposed to do and then finished, you know, two or to two takes, two, three takes. It makes it makes me different to everybody's threshold of how they're working and how they speed of everything going, which is great. We have talked like a few people that have worked with Clint Eastwood and they've all been like you shop for work and then you're done in like eight hours and it's like one of the love the most lovely experience will ever have working concerns. But I have heard that George Clooney's like that as well, so we'll wait and see. A home for dinner. Director absolutely. My it's I did a monuments men with him. She's she works in the art department occasionally and it does whatever she wants to do, and she said he was wonderful. He used to just turn up, hello to everybody, really friendly, get down do it and then home. Yeah, which is makes a big difference because, you know, sometimes the hours that people are put into, you know, working in the film industry is stupid. Mad Yeah, so this is like, I think, like the last other movie TV show that we want to talk about happen a while back. But you it says on your IMDB that you worked on blackadder and Mr Bean. I loves blackadder and as a child I was a big Mr Bean Fan. Oh, they were both brilliant. And blackadder, Oh, I never forget doing that. And we we just had we had the best actors, we had the best everybody who did it was just amazing, talented, really fantastic people. I mean, you know, they were all out of college like I was. I just literally started at the BBC and and and to do something like that was just I was so lucky. Ben Elton used to do the warm up for the audiences, you know. So we had fantastic people working with us and that was great. And then Mr Bean again, mad did you did you ever get to like talk with Rowan Atkinson at any point? Yeah, yeah, we used and was obviously in Um in blackadder as well. So you know, with from Mr Bean to blackadder. And then I remember going to the sales one January and I was outside a big department store in London and he was there waiting to get in. He was like first in the queue to get in and I just looked at him and laughed. But I don't know if you recognized me or not, but it was quite funny the fact that we just done that and there he was in the queue to get into the sales. But all they were just they were so lovely, all of them, and we work with so many good people on those, those shows, because I think I think it was very obvious that they were all going to become really amazing actors, writers, composers, whoever they whatever they were going to be, it was very obvious that they were definitely going places. John Lloyd, who produced the the show, was shows were he was amazing. He you know, it was just I think I was really lucky to have had that chance to do those things. So what are you working on now that you are at liberty to time, liberty to tell you, because I started this week. It's some film called boys in the boat and George Clooney's going to be directing it and it's about the one thousand nine hundred and thirty six Olympic Games which were set in Germany, with with Hitler and the Nazis put on the big show and and the American rowing team from Seattle, from Washington University, beat the Germans that unexpectedly. They came from nowhere and won the gold medal. So it's a really good feel good film. It's some it's got a great story and a very happy ending. That's exciting. Do you do you know when you start work, like physically start working on it? Yeah, we're going to start. I've I've started just this week, but we start filming in the beginning of April. So we'll be April, May, June, finish in July sometime. And where's it? Where's the shooting? Well, it's all in the UK actually. So we've got to make the UK look like Washington and and Germany and yeah, Berlin, Washington, New York, yeah, really easy. Same as UK locations. Yeah, hopefully look English. I don't know...

...if you're ready for this, for this is the big Huna final question. Party on a pop the question. Sure, so the big CAHUNA final question, don't be too scared. Is just what's the last great film? You are and that good, great, last great film. Yeah, we we have pretty much every guess. We ever have our stune. They all get like absolutely terrified, like I'm too busy work nice films. I can't want shouts my husband and ask him. He might remember what I've said, that I thought was amazing and I'd watch it again. The last great film? Oh my goodness, we can bend the rules and allow like a TV show also, if you've seen any of that recently. Or could be like on deal or no deal, where you have like the help thing and you could call and call your husband. I can to hold my husband. Can you remember the best film we've watched recently? Hey, can't hear me step. I think I hear him like clicking on a microwave and less another that he's getting something out the fridge. Hello, an, I'm doing an interview at the moment and I've been asked what's the best film we've recently watched. The great film, not just a good film, Great Great Film. Not just a good film, a great film. No, recently, what have we watched that? We thought was that one, that one with the where they sit around the table. Oh, yes, that was so. That was fantastic, wasn't it? Yeah, what was I literally just we watched it just a couple of weeks ago. It was some it's about the four people who sit down in a church hall and start talking about something and note you don't know at the beginning. What was it called? A mass? Yes, nice part. Those actors were amazings in Isaacs. was proper. You're not supposed to be in it. Oh well, now he's the celebrity. Guess it's no, this is he's. Oh, he has he's probably a cup of tea. You thought it was the microwave. It was actually a cup of tea. Crafts Services on craft services. Thank you. Oh yeah, that was amazing. That was really a very, very clever and those actors and the writing and just even that, like the way they put the chairs out in that village hall, you know, and everything that was just and the glasses that were moved and everything that was. It was just very, very clever. It's got to be nice being a set decorator and then watching a movie and being like wow, they decorated the shit out of the set. Yeah, although I did what I tell you. What I did watch the other day and I thought just look beautiful was nightmare alley. I thought it look Garmadul Toro. Yeah, it did look beautiful. It's some it was just that canvas and the colors of those of you know, the whole place and the costumes, the hair and ever. The whole thing just did look beautiful. But then again, the original black and white film of that was amazing, and then you just go, HM, why have they made that again? So did he just said West, he's sor he just said West, that he liked west. Transfort loves were so story. Yeah, we're such as so good. Yeah, but then what about the first one? The first one it was just it's like why do it again? When he does it have the Spielberg kaminsky touch? Now it didn't. Did, but then again, but then again, did it need to? No, no, no, no, you're right. It's an unenviable task to remake like one of the most perfect movies, films. It is, but BLA, bla Ba, but there's a big butt here and the big butt is uncle Steven Spielberg and like he knows what he is doing, so just let him do it, you know. Yeah, yeah, and it was beautiful. It did look amazing. Adams dophous and did it fabulous job on it. But the funny thing is I looked at how much that to cost and it cost the same amount as the last Jew wow. Yeah, it was either's a hundred million dollars, same, same budget. They yet they had huge sets that they filmed. Some of it in newer New Jersey, which is it really yeah, sue, and a lot in like the five burrows of New York. Yes, yeah, but in Newark part was probably like the cheapest place where they could, you know what, could do anything they want. They could really crumble some buildings. Yeah, Trent and I are both from New Jersey and we can at we're allowed to poke fun. The other forty nine states don't talk about us, but part do you think that's it? Yeah, I think we've covered everything we wanted to cover. Then you so much to judy far our guests. She's worked on a lot...

...of cool stuff and check it out. I should rent last night in Soho. It's not in theaters anymore, probably about the time that this interviews coming out, but you should rent it for like four or five dollars because it's totally worth your time and money. Yeah, yeah, I think so. All right, and check out her other work too, you like you know, last Dul Rocka Man King speech. Need I say more? She's worked on some good movies. Yeah, all right, thank you so much. Thank you very much. Really enjoyed it. So parth, pretty cool interview. Yeah, it turned out to be an actual interview and not just random assortment of noises. Right, you are. You're going to edit in some noises. Right. I don't kiss. Until part. You've never kissed another living breathing person. Is that right? They never let me hear. Yeah, so you've only kiss dead people. I thought this interview was great. I thought Judy far gave a bunch of insightful little stories. Now, HMM and Trent, should we talk about what she said off the air about Stanley Kubrick? He said that's in the Kubrick made her sandwiches or, Toey, he made her toe Marmalade on toe best. Yeah, and that's what she remembered most. And she said that he was crazy and she tried to describe it to us and yeah, he sound like a pretty complicated guy. But then so she she she says that she works with Stanley, she'd worked with Stanley Cooper on eyes, White shut and I'm like dog, I'm the Tom Cruise Fan, I would have asked you. It wasn't on our IMDB page. And then she goes, Oh yeah, and I have a sign script by him and we go, can we see it? And she pulls it out and we'll have that up on the instagram. And then she goes, Oh yeah, and I have a personal note that Stanley Cooprick wrote to me that I also have, and it was framed on her wall and his handwriting was very sloppy, ellegible and unique and she couldn't figure out what it said, despite it being framed on her wall for many years. And then she showed it to us and we couldn't figure it out. So what the note says from Stanley Kubrick, now deceased, we do not know and frankly we may never know, but we'll put it up on the instagram and hopefully one of you guys can figure it out, but I feel like if they started bringing people back from the dead, he should be high in the list. Yeah, well, Trent, we're tired right me, we got to end this episode. Short term and long term, I'd say that we are tired, but we are slowly approaching one hundred episodes and then we are and then it'll all be worth while. Yeah, all of our hard work, the long nights of pod casting. So next week is you can join us for a discussion of last night and so hope, and you can go follow U us. Do you think it'll just be the boys? I think it'll just be the two of us. HMM. Follow us on all of our social media. We have instagram and twitter. Those are the two we have, and give us a good review and rating on alimals, posty, yeah, and spotify. Do, Trent, anything else we got to do? No part of you want a plug or other podcast called Pot podding with parth. Oh yeah, know that my new podcast, potting with parth. It's it's it's a it's an interesting podcast. Actually. I've been able to get the contact information of people that have worked behind the scenes on films and for they've been kind enough to interview similar. They're interviewing you. Wait, no, no, I'm interviewing them. Well, okay, wait, wait, it's complicated. It alternates. Is this just like the B sides of our podcasts? And you've edited out my audio track potting with parth. It's everywhere. You can listen to podcast on what day? On what day is or is it released Sun Dirty? Yeah, don't feel like you're stepping on someone's toes. They're the lower. You know. I think, I think, I think Jesus is okay with this. Okay, don't thank you're on any sacred ground right now. I done, Trent, like. You can say that as many times as you want, I'm not going to know what you're talking about. I think there's already a well established podcast that famously releases, I guess, at some point on Sundays. I've the duck. No, Trent, that's that's Monday's. Yeah, well, this is going on far too long, I'd say. We we go our separate ways now. We've been...

...recording for like twenty minutes and I'm pretty sure we only have like ten minutes of like except where we're actually talking about what we need to good. Yeah, all right, see you guys, see you next week. I love you, but.

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