Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Craft Services
Craft Services

Episode 37 · 1 year ago

THE KING OF STATEN ISLAND (2020) with Screenwriter Dave Sirus

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent discuss The King of Staten Island with one of its screenwriters, Dave Sirus. They also briefly discuss the IT films. 

Edited by Parth Marathe

The other poet. I can do this. Yeah, you got this. Should I leave this in the edit? I think I've gone now. I have to. All Right, the our movie podcast called Craft Services. At start of episode we ask each other what part been eating. Hey, parth, what have you been eating? Oh, thanks, man by the I. Yeah, good to see you, too long time, I see. It was weird how there was that Russian voice at the beginning. Yeah, who was that? Do you use some there's some sort of grew versus generic, you know, Soviet soldier, kind of right combination. Yeah, I do, like really funny stand up. Yeah, no, it's Oh, hey, that that time. anyways, I had five chocolate chip cookies. You couldn't stop before. Tell you why, Star, no, I'll tell you why. I'll tell you why, Trent Jesus. Well, here's the deal. I had lunch earlier in the day and then we were going to do a little interview with a fun guest, who you'll find out later. Who that is yet could be announced. Guessed. Yeah, so it was just going to we were just about to do the interview and I was like, Hmm, I' feeling a little hungry. I don't want to do an interview hungry, but I didn't feel like having actual food. So I was like, I think five small chocolate chip cookies from Costco should do the trick. You know what they say about doing an interviews on an empty stomach. Try to avoid it if possible. That's I mean, that's what I've heard. That's my that's my creed. Trent. What, if what have you been eating this morning? I hit my head really hard yesterday while skiing and so I was I was suppoosed. Yeah, so I was supposed to go skiing again today, but I call that off and since I couldn't do anything, you know, that physically intensive, because I may be concussed. To be determined. Don't tell my parents, they'd worry, but they listen to this show more so the discussions than the interviews. They just like to hear our playful discourse. They don't care about dulcet tones, they don't care about our exciting guests. Well, okay, well, basically me and a female associate went to a dinosaur museum. A very good friend, Trent. Yes, yes, a good friend of mine went to a dinosaur museum to look at some dinosaur bones, because that was a low impact sport and then we grabbed sandwiches and it's nice in Utah, so we eat them on a park in Utah. Well, that's enough of that, Trent. How about we c the intro quelled the INTHRA Park. Welcome back to cliffs Theil. This is what we talk about Zim movies each week. We talked about the film and hopefully have a man bill of that film. Well, this is just becoming rush French. Now hopefully have member of that film to talk with us about their experience working on the movie. This week we had the right thought of King of Statin Island. They of Cyrus. He was an excellent man and we really enjoyed having him on. I'll joke will guy. All jokes aside, what a what a comedic person. He was nice enough to give us his time and his responses and you should listen to it. Well, you're already here. I feel like, I hope you do, kind of made that decision. You're your stick around, guys. It's gonna get better. Your promise. You're on the course to hearing the episode. As long as you don't turn us off in the next and the next two seconds. What if we keep like delaying it, like we just keep talking, and so they keep thinking we're going to cut to the intro, but then every...

...whenever I say cut to the Intro, we never actually do. Oh not, not the intro of the interview. Sorry. Are you suggesting that we stall the audience, as if Piss P, postponing the inevitable, as if, like, you know, filibustering, like trying to exactly, trying to exactly in I want to do. I want to use the democratic processes that we have at our disposal, basically to screw around with our really nice listeners because, because, why not? We're we're a successful podcast, mate. Yeah, and when as many as you know, triple digit people come to listen to your show, you can kind of just play with their emotions and waste their time. It's almost like there aren't any competing movie podcast that they could go give their time and attention to. Not a single one, Trent, I'm glad you brought that up. We have no competition. We have cornered a very niche market of movie related podcast with interviews of people that work on movies. Part I think we need to go ourselves a little credit. There are some interviews that only do you know, round table general discussions, and then there are other, you know, solely interview based podcast, and somehow we manage to to live a double life and do both. Okay, Trent, let me tell you what we do. Welcome back to craft services. Are Should we talk about the movies? Each week we talked about film and hopefully have a grown member of that found to talk with us about their experience working on the movie. This week we had the CO writer of King of satin island, Dave Cyrus. He talked with us about working on the movie and it was pretty cool. Yeah, so that's how it's done. Motherfuckers, I'd say this joke has has has, has lived its entire lifespan and the now would be a good time too, you know, you know, cut to the cut, cut, cut to the interview, cut, do the interview with day Cyrus, the writer of King of stuff, and just try out trench. All right, draw God, we got out all the INFO. Start the episode, got to the interview. You're the interview. Start now, go at this moment. Go. All right, that was pretty good. That was a good bit. Hello everybody, and welcome to our interview with Dave Cyrus. He's a stand up comic writer and producer who's worked on some things you may have heard of, such as triumph, the insult comic dog SNL, and our film for today, Judd Apatow's the king of Staaten Island. Thanks so much for coming on. Yes, thank you, guys. How are you? We're great, outstand thank you for asking. So we just want to ask what was your relationship with film at a young age? Oh well, I watched many films as a child and TV shows. Sure I can be specific if you need pleak. I definitely I know that I watched a lot of as a little kid. I watched a lot of like little rascals and like Shirley temple like things from like, you know, decades before I was born, just like because that's what was put on for me, and I mean I always kind of engaged and connected more with TV than reality. So I think that definitely pushed me toward the entertainment industry, especially as a kid. I definitely watched a lot of TV. You were an American child. I read online that your favorite movie is Anchorman. Does that did kind of yeah, is that no longer true? You can you can not mean it is im I'd just don't really have a good, definitive favorite movie, but yeah, pretty much I think it's yeah, it's really good. But yeah, that's definitely part of that is being more into like TV than movies growing up, I think. So what was your first real writing job? That was probably writing sort of this show on...

...cbscom this socalled TV briefly, which like talked about other TV shows on CBS. It was a weird job. It was kind of a weird place that definitely didn't exist for that long but called like CBS interactive, which is definitely not what would parent, which I guess now was what paramount is. So but yeah, we're to them like in a very weird office environment and I wrote for that show and then I didn't get like another, like really professional writing job until sort of like the I guess, sort of the Justin Bieber roast, though I was doing like a lot of stuff online. I was doing stuff on Youtube and I was doing like interviews and, you know, performing, but not like writing. Well, speaking of performing, we wanted to ask how you when you started pursuing stand up and added that transition into more so writing behind the scenes. I started writing as I started doing stand up when I was seventeen. At like April, like when I was like seventeen years old, I did like an open I did like a talent show at like a hotel, like a like a resort type thing. That was first time I'ver like performed in front of people. How did it go? I won, so it was good, but it was, you know, probably I think it'd helped that I I was seventeen, I looked maybe like ve thirteen. They're probably helped, made more easily impressed. But yeah, I just started doing open mics like in Jersey, doing shows in New York and stuff. Not doing that great, but just doing but like, you know, doing well enough, like I was doing well at the shows I was doing. I just wasn't like getting offered like major shows. So did your I looked you up on Youtube and some of the first results are like you in roast battles with other people. Did that play a role in you getting the Justin Bieber roast and have you worked on any subsequent roasts? Well, no, I was. I work in the Justin Bieber rose before rose battling was even like really a thing. I mean it was, I guess it existed, but it wasn't like I didn't Roast Bat I. I didn't Roast Battle until after that. So I wrote the Justin Bieber roast first and then I also wrote for the row blow and the Alec Baldwin Roasts, but the first roast battle was like right before I started doing essen. Now just a quick question about the celebrity rose dude, the celebrities like Miss There's like the whole panel of people, as I'm sure you know, Dude. They not write anything? Does it all come from writers behind the scenes? Depends on the person. I mean, people who don't do comedy aren't really usually are going to write much. Some do, some insist on it, but comedians tend to write a lot of what they're what they're saying. Like definitely, like you know, like Pete and I wrote, you know, almost everything, all the vast majority of the jokes you saw him do. So he's writing a lot of his own stuff. I know like Natasha L Jero is has writers also, but he's also writing a lot. Rob Riggle, maybe he might have done it all himself. That's possible, I could see. I could see that have been just him. But yeah, but like you know, I don't think Martha Stewart wrote a lot of her own jokes. HMM, understandable. So, because you mentioned him, it kind of segues into another one of her questions, which is how did your relationship ship with Pete Davidson Start? And I believe from another interview that you said that you started working when he was eighteen together. Yeah, yeah, we met when he was eighteen doing a show to vfw and then we sort of hanging out when he was can't he was in La to film something. You don't...

...really know anyone there. We were hanging out, you know, we got along really well and then we started writing stuff together because he had some offers. You know, I was able to help. I had more experience writing and you know, he had he was, you know, a very popular kind of like like it was about to become popular, kind of getting opportunities. So it just worked out. So, transitioning into our main topic, the king of Stunton Island, whose idea was it to make the movie and how was it decided that you would write the one of the drafts? Well, that's not really how it works and that it wasn't how it works. Yeah, no, no, we wrote dozens of drafts, all of us. We write. Pete, Judd and I would write first. You spent a lot of time writing the the outline, a lot of time writing individual scenes and you just sort of compiling these hundred of different versions of a movie, one of which ends up sort of becoming what you know, along with a lot of the input from the actors and and being in the moment and how you apply it when you're actually on set. That's what really kind of compiles what the movie is. Judd had wanted to do a movie with the two of us for years before Pete was on us and now, but it was canceled because Pete on us now. And so then around like twenty eighteen, we pete and I had just written some other scripts and judge said he wanted to take a crack at writing something the three of us together again, and so we just started a process of really just starting from the bottom and building a movie around Pete's sort of real life, sort of emotional history in a fictional story, and we just sort of built it from that of just trying to just learn a lot about, you know, his childhood and you know who you know who he was and stuff and and just sort of try to build a very accurately, I'd accurately told fictional story. So how were you first introduced to Judd Apatow? Well, through Pete. Pete had already worked, well, not, I don't know who's not not already, but pete had worked with Judd on train wreck and that's what got Pete's intes. That's what got both Judd and lauren interested in Pete Really. So that's that's where he knew judd. And so I knew judge when I was working at s now and we had talked about some other ideas. We discussed a different script entirely around two thousand and sixteen that we didn't we never ended up completing. So we've been kind of going back and forth about different ideas move you watch for several years. What was the two thousand and sixteen script? I mean just like a log line, if you don't mind my asking, gap year. So you brought up the process of cowriting. How how did you actually cowrite? Was it sort of like you guys riffing off of each other and then just sort of writing a transcript of that, or was it each of you. So spend a lot of your own you spend a lot of time together discussing the major points of it and then you would individually sort of start writing scenes and then you go back and forth between each other, writing different versions of what the last person wrote. Change you whatever you wanted and they can sort of letting it evolve over time. Basically. So the final version of like the the shooting script, like on set, did you end up doing a lot of like real like rewrites as things were happening, or were you just like find? Yeah, things are a log and jokes and stuff. Yeah, things are constantly getting rewritten day of every day. We're writing multiple different versions of the scene we already have planned and then we're going to have the actors do multiple versions. So on set, were you what was your role, like your primary role while on set? Where you just...

...sort of working on the script, or were you like yeah, if you could just be on that? Yeah, I was writing alternate lines for what ever dialog was going to happen that day, as well as sort of just, you know, paying attention to everything. It's sort of what you know. Kind of the producing part of it is is you're just sort of watching things being like hey, you know, is this going to match? Did we make a mistake here? You know, you're just you're just sort of have to be very rare of everything that's happening because as a writer, you're one of the only people who's going to kind of be in a position to notice certain things might not be what you want. That person should have our why they shouldn't be saying hello to each other because they already met chronologically earlier, that sort of thing. So where there any scenes in particular that you saw very specifically on the page and then in the in the final picture, were wildly different? Everything was different, I'm sure. Really Yeah, there's all kinds of things that like because there's a very specific way you envisioned something and you very rarely see it exactly that way. So yeah, there's there's all kinds of stuff like that that you know you end up and usually it's better because it's in real life and now you can it's something because of just certain things you just can't predict until you see it and you don't know if it works until you see it. So yeah, there's a lot of stuff like that. I mean out of the really think there's anything that specific, because everything kind of is just the bones of something and then you really see it for real and it's totally different. Like one of the scenes that was more mine in general would be like the Action Bronson scene. And there's a lot of specific there's a lot of little things that I would have very much liked to have still made it but just couldn't logistically. And there's other things that end up being great that you know I wrote that day. You know that I've you know, just in the moment, just trying to think of new things. What we'll can this guy say, oh, yeah, I know Appataus like shooting styles very famously like let's do it a bunch of times and what we'll see what comes out of it, which I think it is very cool. Personally, I would have liked to have done more judd. Judd makes everyone do like three four takes and you tried to raise and it's really loose and then he'll start maybe and then he'll yell out, you know, stuff you do just like, you know, just alt the we just in the moment just yell at the alts and have the person do it fresh. I my directing style is too slavishly just make people do it over and over again until I hear the one I want. HMM, a true David fincher if you will. Yeah, yeah, except that I wanted to make sense. How long was the shooting screenplay and where was there like a lot that got cut out, because I think I remember seeing that like the original cut or the like. The first cut was about three hours long. And so is that mostly just fine tuning of jokes, or were the first stunts? The First Cup was a two and a half. Okay, I'm first cut that I was ever like aired for anyone was like two hundred and thirty six of the most and that's because you're just trying to see which scenes you are working, which seems are not. You know. Yeah, I mean there was more, because you shoot a lot of things that you know you're not going to use all of. It's just you're sort of just shooting different versions of like a mood that you're trying to establish. So yeah, there was definitely something. There's multiple endings that we shot. Their multiple much more cohee coherently like ending endings then we actually wanted to use. So just because we want to shoot and see if they would go. So like there's multiple different versions of like what that tell more about what happens to the characters after, you know, after that then we actually ended up realizing was necessary. How did you guys like arrive to the conclusion of like where the movie actually does end? It's an editing decision really. It's something you decide when you actually see the footage and you're sitting down and and you know, trusting your instincts about where it should go. So I heard you say in an interview...

...that one of your favorite lines that got caught was Mirsa Tom a pronouncing the mask of Zorro and no, no, Bill powey. Oh, I was sorry, someone announcing the mask of Zarow so what is your favorite joke that's like still in the movie? It doesn't have to be like that. You wrote it yourself. Well, it's something to be one that I wrote myself, but I mean there's a lot of jokes I like. I I it's funny. I remember there was one version that was longer that this was cut from, and I remember saying, I was like we cannot cut Ruby Tattoosday, like I can't lose that. Come on, yeah, it's my baby. And I don't think it was going to get cut, but it just there was a version that wasn't in and I was like, guys, guys, Jesus Christ, I do like also, just because other people have brought it up to me, that I was had and it's a it's a joke that I wrote like the day of, which was tell my sister. I know she's my mother. All Right, I have a few like favorite lines that I picked out and I wanted to know, okay, if you had ors. So the first the first one, I'll tell you. Sometimes it's hard to remember who because you won't like hundreds of rooms. So, like there's literally lines I like, I like that, and months later be like Oh, yeah, I think I said that. It was like yeah, I was going to say if one of these rings about, I'll be happy. Yeah, then the first one is fucking home run todd, when p asked just the the the fro kid at the party for we'd that's definitely Pete. The next one is the bed bug monolog between Pete and one of the firemen guys, and you know who will be left at the end of the day? The bed bugs. I mean becky. Oh yeah, becky on did a great job with that. He definitely like would have. I know I definitely improvised sort of the arrangement of it, but the original I know that. I don't remember who wrote the bed bugs. And then the last thing was the concept of the waiters fighting with the hulk hands for tips. I like that. The that. Well, that was just something that happened to Pete. So I don't think they were that they were hell cans. They might have. Yeah, I think that was just a mostly true story. Awesome. So the movies obviously called King of Staten Island and we were wondering how much of the movies actually shot on Statin Nottland. Pretty much everything. Oh, really, there's a few interiors that are shot in the stage, but almost everything stet island. So I read that this was the first script you've gotten produced and I was wondering if there were any like full scripts that you've like poured your heart and soul into earlier in life that sadly did not get produced. I I've sold. I'd sold to other scripts you know that actually like studio scripts that I'd sold before, but neither of which I poured anything into. So nothing that I was too attached to so in writing them, where you just like, I think this is what that the studio, the big studio heads, are going to want, and then you just said No. I mean I wrote it, I cared about what I was doing and I tried to write as best I could. It just but I wouldn't say that those, know, any of those, were particularly ones that I was very emotionally attached to, because the none of those were ones that I envisioned the premise of. So, speaking of writing, obviously, as we mentioned before, you worked behind the scenes on SNL and we were wondering how the writing process for that differed from your writing process on this or just like what the writing is like behind the scenes on us now, because that just be cool to find out. Well, it's much more individual in the sense that, like, you just have a script, you hand it in. There's not a lot of there's not a lot of structure to that. If you write with someone, fine, not fine, but you write a script and you handed in and then it gets read. So there's basically there's...

...basically no real like overseeing or sort of there's there's no real management of the script writing until after the read through and then you would have it sort of just then. You would have it sort of, you know, worked and you would have a table where you would have other writers there pitch on it before, you know, going to actual filming or preparing to do live. So I read that you like right with Pete for his segments on weekend update and I was wondering, like, do you write like full sketches also, and how did you get involved with us Nol in the first place? or well, I got hired by US now just the same way. You know, anyone else would. I you know, Pete had already been working there for one year, so that's why I was able to be one of the many people who sit. It's a packet I did and I I they chose the packet that hired me with. I. But no, I don't really write sketches in general. My main thing that I've written on es and now has been the the updates. I mean when I when I was a staff writer, there are two, Thou sixteen. Most of the sketchwriting that I would I'd gotten on was during like political sketches, called open stuff like that, a lot of the election stuff. But since then my writing on es and L has pretty much entirely been the updates which I pretty much been writing with Pete since two thousand and sixteen. So this says I was just going to say. Just said a curiosity the staff packets, like how many like like sketches or like, like what do you submit in it? Like I'm sure it's a very defined amount of because it changes a little bit, but I believe it's something like to sketch it, to live sketches, to pretapes, a topical and then I also included an update feature just because that was sort of a more specific thing I was being hired to do. I was just going to ask if you have any Lauren Michael Story. You could tell us if you have any. Hmm he well, I know that the problem that before covid everyone before the episode would all have to pile into his office, so like the entire staff would be in his office before before, and that now they'll do it like on the stage wherever we could be separate. But like before, it was like you were every single person works there was getting just packed into this office and I imagine it was not as packed, you know, before in the forty years, but you were completely sealed in to like, you know, forget like the final notes before the show, and I've been. So I've been, you know, pressed up against some very famous people in that room, Bernie Sanders, Al Sharpton, Mike Myers. So yeah, I've been. I've been pressed up against my share of major people. I've been. Hillary Clinton was in there, you know, trump was in there, like I you know, it's yeah, it's probably not room with a lot of people. Yeah, so as an SNL writer, what is like? Are you making changes that the night of also? Well, yeah, especially because, like you know, you have a dress rehearsal and you're kind of also looking to how that does. Decide what you're going to do to the sketch. If there's anything you have to cut, and oftentimes you have to cut for time anyway, where they like you need to make a thirty second shorter or something. Usually when you when you write the sketch, it's with the intention that it's two pages longer than it's given. When you do it, oftentimes we cut huge swaths of updates right before we go on. I wanted to add ask about triumph, the insult Comic Dog, because my dad and I were really big we followed the two thousand...

...and sixteen stuff that I guess you were part of, and I wanted to just ask how'd you get a part of that and what was that like, just submitting jokes to them as a you know, and not as a random person. That was through my agent, I mean, but like as of one of the many people who just submitting got lucky. They liked it, and so I got hired for that, traveling around going to like, you know, very, you know, weird stuff, like, you know, the debates and stuff. And Yeah, that was really cool because I really, really loved triumph and Smiggles, TV fun house work. So it was really, really a great experience, especially right after leaving us. Now. So I heard you say in another interview that you viewed movies as a delivery system for jokes and I thought that that was ironic because I was like they came stun island is a it's it's a highly character driven, you know, dramedy with with some plot points, and so, yeah, what was that difficult for you? I mean, in a sense it not. You know, I was able to adapt to that being the kind of story we were telling. There were definitely versions of scripts that were that that were, you know, just slapsticky, joke driven. You know where every line is. You're looking for a way of saying it funny. But that was really what we were going for here. So but yeah, I mean my end pete sort of general style is much jokier. But judge, you know this judge, was directing end writing. So there's a lot of, you know, direction he could put into that and you know he knows a little bit more about making films that we do. So like this wasn't a story that, you know, we felt would be sustainable with the kind of with that kind of instinct of, you know, making it too jokey, making it not real, because that's what because it could be funnier. But you do when you make something Funnier, very often you are stretching and pulling away from the part of this that is letting someone lose themselves and in believing it right, just sort of going back into the draft, I guess, because this is kind of mirror to Pete Davidson's real life past a little bit. How did you decide what would sort of more accurately depict him and what to sort of change for the movie? Or but yeah, well, the only thing that we were just not even we didn't want to make a movie about Pete and we certainly didn't want to make a movie about it, about comedy. We did not want to make a movie where a guy is stand up comedian. That was the that was the only part of it that we were just really completely against, and so just became more thing about all right, will who is pete had he never done this? What what would he be like if he had never discovered a talent or had a talented comedy and and could sort of, you know, build his life off that. So, speaking to your more recent, you know, roast battles, we are wondering, like if, if you're given a picture of a person and like that's how you who you have to roast tomorrow, if you have a sort of philosophy or system for coming up with like where to where to start, for finding insults for any given individual. Mostly it's about just getting information about them, because the information itself is where you're going to get the the opportunities to be funny. Literally in the words like you basically sort of just start thinking of different sentences that describe this person accurately and then you start seeing, well, what can I do with that? So it's almost like you're sort of writing out like how many different true things could I say that are specific to you, and then look at those things and say, and now how can I say something mean related to these things? How can or you start with, okay,...

I want to say something to the effect of this being something he should be ashamed of, and then and you work backwards to how can that apply that to something related, that is true about this person, that is specific to this person, and a lot of it is just what is the initial reaction? What is the audience thinking about this person? What is something that they're going to not know anything about him but they're going to hear that and go yeah, that's true. Have you ever I mean obviously you don't need to name names or anything, but have you ever had like a person that you've first like react really terribly or, if they have, they for the most part been down? I don't. I can't think of anyone who reacted really terribly. I mean different people are better at it and different people are better at sort of what the what the protocol is and sort how you should act. I've seen people get really to take it too seriously, and I think that really ruins it for me. Anyway, when they take it like they mean this and they like that, they're they're trying to like and it or or, even worse, they're trying to make the audience think they really hate you, and it's like that's this gross. I was watching some some of your roast and I just thought, like, while you aren't the person who's speaking, like just like it must be so hard to like look busy and you just have to like sit there and like brace for impact and like try to not look offended, because if you look offended, then they won right. But the thing is, I don't most comics, I don't think, really care about what you're saying. Some people do, and I feel like they shouldn't, but like no one's ever said something to me in a roast battle that hurt my feelings, you know what I mean, like yeah, but you do have to. But yeah, you do have to also just sort of, you know, be poised, because people are watching you, so you're just you're supposed to and not be all, which is a difficult thing for some people. So I guess just pivoting a little bit to some other stuff you've written for. You were a writer for the politician puppet show. Let's be real. And what was that like? That's great. That's, you know, working. That's the same team as triumph. So those are, you know, some of the best writers I've ever worked with. It's really I mean these are some like really heavy hitter, kind of like high level writers like Andy Breckman, who created monk, Andrew Weinberg, who created Eagle Heart, Brian Rich, who's written for for at and Bruno, and or just a lot of Sacha Baron Cohen stuff. I mean David Feldman, who is a very famous, deeply mentally ill comedian since the the early s. It was really great to work with like just so many people I love and the episode and that will that show is coming back. We have really a great team on that to right now. It's really it's really awesome. It's a very it's a very like sort of strict kind of writing too, because you have asked to be about you go and make so many puppets and you have to write sketches that are specific to these celebrity puppets, use the puppets. Well, I mean it's not easy, but it's it's very, you know, it's really really fun kind of kind of writing and and it's like I don't love sketchwriting, but I'm good at, I think, topical jokes and that's where I sort of fit in. Sure. So, pivoting little, you your your pseudonym. You have a pen name of brick stone, you know, an interview man, and I was wondering how'd you get the idea for it and what like? What was the first quote interview you did? When I was a freshman in college, I enjoyed a sketch group and the first thing I did was create a character of a sleazy reporter making fun of Stone Phillips, called brick stone, where it was just...

...me trying to make a girl cry in an interview. And then I started lying to people on campus just to get the react, mostly to get them to pretend that they knew something that wasn't real, like asking them about news stories that didn't exist to see if I could get someone to bullshit their way through it. And I did that continually. I brought that back when Youtube years later with Youtube, and then was like this could work for like hate groups, just because I saw like people at Comic con trying to make fun of them, and it was like they would make a big spectacle and have costumes and signs making fun of Wests Borrow, and Westboro would react to that with gale because they were like really excited that these people who hate them were drawing attention to them. And I watched that and I thought I think I could, I think I know a way. They're not going to like this. That was essentially I was like, I'm pretty sure I know a way to ruin the enjoyment they're getting from these protests. Is essentially what I went into it thinking. It seemed. It seems like on a small scale, you became somewhat like the brickstone. Videos have a lot of views and I was wondering, has anyone ever like tried to punch you or something like while you are no, no, it's unfortunate. I wish they had. Really it was always ready for that. It would be an automatic, you know, jump in the in the views. So yeah, that'd be really good material. I'vey. West borrow does not fight back, they do not get physical. One Guy Spit on someone once and was immediately kicked out. So they're just very they're non violent, mostly to protect themselves because otherwise they'll get torn to pieces. And when I've done the other the other groups that I've made fun of that like at like Gay Pride Parades, other hate groups, now I've never had anyone trying to get physical. I was wanted them to. I guess I just have one last question about the movie, Trent, if you have anything else. Yeah, so free. Yeah. So, obviously the movie came out under circumstances under which I don't think you guys were planning for, and I was wondering what it was like to sort of get the move your released sort of on streaming and what that was like for you. I mean it was weird. Obviously. You know everything about covid and the and the timing of it with the movie made it an interesting time for me, because I would very lucky and that I was not suffering like so many other people from the pandemic and the lockdown in the disease itself, but I did miss out on a cartoonishly amazing few months that I've never experienced and may never in my life, in the sense that like I was right about to start getting like flown to south by southwest and other film festivals and go into premieres and going to a comedy clubs and gloating constantly, like there was a period of time that I lost that I was going to have basically everything I've been hoping to achieve. So I kind of lost that stuff, but you're still very happy that things still worked out, especially when so few movies were able to actually successfully go and be pay per view during this I was shocked that people were buying it. I was going to say your movie did particularly well on pay per view. Yeah, I was. I was like, is anyone going to buy a movie at all? I was like is does anyone want to pay to see a movie when, like the world is falling apart? I was like, are they just buying trolls? Tobe as a babysitter? Right, and so I was yeah, I was really happy...

...that like like that, it it did well and people liked it. I mean it was basically but people asked what it's like. It was basically like watching a bullet whizz past your head. Yeah, no, I think I think it was great, especially during these times. I think people needed a comedy that sort of addressed some more serious things, but Trent, you want to ask the Big One? Yes, the the big CAHUNA. Last question is what's the last great movie you watched? And it can be a first viewing or a revisit. That's it's not easy. Yeah, brain blast. Take a middle last I'm so much better at listing what I hated. I'm trying to think like what's the last new movie I re can list something you disliked as well? We're happy to here. In anything. I'm trying to stop doing that so much, because every time I do, someone I have to like see again is involved, and it's just like I want to make sure people know which movies are unforgivably bad, but like literally the last four in a row that I've seen, someone who's feelings I had no reason to hurt is directly involved and I'm so muzzled with my ability to explain. And one of them is one person in two movies and they were both so bad that I it's not fair that I'm not allowed to just rent publicly about them. So I but a movie I liked. Let's see. Actually, okay, I actually do it. He's got it. I should don't good answer. That was it, the the IT and sequel. Those are much better than expected. I was just going to say what do you think of it chapter two, because it's someone who really liked it chapter one, it chapter two. I thought they were both good. I thought they were both fine. I thought that it is a very hard story to tell properly, especially later. I thought the second one was kind of better because the first one exercised almost all the events from the from the first part of the book. Like the problem is, I'm not saying that you should keep them, but when you take it out all the weird kids sex stuff, there's really not that much happening anymore. When their kids they took out. They took out all the stuff that is super problematic now, but they didn't replace it with anything and so there's no turtle, there's no there's no group sex, there's no using homosexuality to identify the villains, all things I'm not saying you need to have in a movie or a book, but you need to have something else instead. A bit if that's what the movie is based on and there's a lot of kids stuff in the in the second one they go you still see a lot of scenes with the kids. I was just going to say the turtle stuff happens in the second one. Now it does. Someone says the word turtle while they're swimming. That is not a thing. That is that is barely a wink. So have you read the thousand plus page it book? No. Yeah, because I think it is one of the books, like infinite jest, that like you buy really ambitiously and then and then you carried around for a while and talk about how you're reading it and then you never actually get to reading it because it's so much of an undertaking, but you you like it. Movies great part. Do want a brace out? Yeah, thanks so much for being here. It was great having you on. That was Dave Cyrus and he worked on the he was a writer for the King of Satan Island and he's worked on a bunch of other cool stuff that you should definitely check out. Again, thanks so much for being here. Thank you well, parth I what you think I was? That...

...was aggressive. What did you think of that interview? I thought it was very fine indeed. How about you trying? I thought it was most stupendous. What do we have planned next for you know, all those all those little kids gathered around the radio at home for the little well, for their little fireside chat with us. Part did you know ninety eight percent of our listeners is under the age of eighteen? Because that true kind of raises some cause for concern when we mark all our episodes explicitly not for kids, because we you know, a Dabblin Oll curseword every once in a while, because just the one or two, because we don't care, three about the ratings or five. ANYWAYS, next week we're going to be discussing our thoughts on the king of Staten Island. We have a guest, right, I think. I hope it's your female friend, but not without any subtext this, but without any subject. No, no, very good for not a very good friend, but a good friend nonetheless, a female associate who, you know, has apparently maybe I'll be living with her next year. We'll see, I don't know. Yeah, parts just signed a lease with this lady, and you know what they say after your once you're living in the same apartment complex as your female classmate, it might as well invite them on for the podcast to get you know that that's a saying that their thoughts on Judd apatow's latest, latest film it's weird that that's such a specific saying that's pretty well known. You know. It's great how it directly applies to our current situation exactly. Okay, yeah, so next week we're going to be talking King Statn island with Chloe Titt Law. Maybe we interviewed somebody just now. That's really cool, that you'll listen to later. I don't know. Maybe. Yeah, it seems like we will be at liberty to disclose that information next next week. So you just, you know, hold on to your socks or hold onto your seat belt, or they'll be they'll be forcibly removed and I'll take them, I'll eat them up, pop part and I will personally come to your house, remove your socks and then escape all under the cloak of darkness and you won't have a Goddamn clue what transpired. You'll think maybe I nozzled off my socks and the middle of the night, maybe they're under the covers on the mattress, out of the bed, but in reality we took them and you're not getting them back ever and we're out.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (120)