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Episode 6 · 2 years ago

JOHN WICK (2014) with Costume Designer Luca Mosca

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent talk with John Wick costume designer, Luca Mosca, as well as their own thoughts on the film. They also reaffirm their commitment to being against racism. 

Edited by Parth Marathe

So, Trent, what have you been eating recently? I am glad you asked. I just had some carrot sticks and Nope, that was it. Just carrot sticks and you. I had some milk. Oh, just like a straight glass of it. That's like a controversial statement to make these days. I Love I love milk. What percent? Two percent. That's fine, the inner mathematic you, though. That's why you haven't heard the memes. Part's apparently okay. Now. Drinking a glass of milk is, to some people, is considered repulsive. Part of part you're talking to a sympathizer, so you're preaching to the choir. I grew up on realized this could get me canceled. I was had a milk a day. Part let's think about it this way. Our bones are some stronger than everyone else. Were fueled with calcium. It say that we do in fact gotten milk. Well put, but actually that is also controversial because, yeah, because it's a government campaign, because the dairy farmers of America, we're just up to their neck and surplus milk. And then they thought what's a catchy slogan, and then they came up with that and it worked, because now me and you we've been fooled. We were manipulated by the US government to just fill ourselves with milk. Why? Our cows like a reoccurring subject in our in our opening discussions. Yeah, we talked about almond milk last week and how, yeah, spared like the cow udders, you know. And then this week I decided not to although I was in the one that had all the it was it was me you, but I sided with carrots because I just wanted my vision to improve, because apparently that's the thing. Have you seen? Were you phineas and Ferb Guy, barthing, be honest. And so I was eating heart. You know that. My friends used to call me Baljeet in high school. Oh well, that's really period of yeah, the year. Oh wait, I wait. Could it be because he's the one Indian character on that show? I don't know what it was about him, or is it like the uncanny physical resemblance I do? I you know, I kind of do look like him in one way. Do you have a do you have a buford in your life, like I'm man with a skull and crossbones undershirt who just constantly harasses you, but you're in a parasitic relationship and you keep coming back that. But this is for is that me? And you wait, wait, which phineas and FERB CHARACTER A my? If anything, I'm like FERB. But what's candace's like boyfriend? What's his name? Do you remember? Jeremy? Jeremy, and his little sister's name is Susie. Will candace doesn't do anything for me Romantically. So I guess I'm not Jeremy. But I guess we can do a grand reveal in the next episode of which phoeas and ferb character I am. Or we can do like a however, like double digit listeners we have, we can have them vote on it. HMM. Well, the reason I brought a face and furb because there's an episode where they chop a bunch of carrots and then they put them into like a pair of glasses and it gives them supervision. I remember this. Oh you, you recall that I love phineas and for ride like when you did. Yeah, no longer, not since I was called Alge. Oh Yeah, I'm sure. Once racism was brought into play, you, racism does tend to kind of ruin things. The mood, a tone will put our atmosphere. I would say that on the on in the General I'm pretty against racism. Bold stance. I am going to second that statement because if I didn't, I think this would become a solo podcast due to the public backlash. Right. So I just want to get onto the show now. Yeah, now that we've condemned all forms of racism, let's move on. It's not got canceled. And welcome back to craft services, the podcast where we talk about the movies and or films. Each week we discuss a different film and hopefully have an interview with a crew member of that movie to talk with us about their experience. This week we're going to be talking about John Wick Zim movie, and with us we have it's costume designer, Luca Mosca parthumb. You saw this movie? Can you briefly describe it to our...

...listeners with a synopsis? Yeah, if if it's from Wikipedia, that's fine. It's actually from my MDP and X. hit man comes out of retirement to track down the gangsters that killed his dog and took everything from him. Yeah, you're you're a man a few words. So is he. HMM, I guess I'll just go into the production history, if that's okay. We you might as well. So this is a project born out of the mind of writer Derek Kolstad. He's the screenwriter for all three John Wick films, although the third one has other writers attached to it. Originally it was a treatment and development for a retired contract killer that comes back to the job and it was originally titled Scorn. And a little on fact for you. John Wick Stars Keanu Reeves as the titular character and when he was attached to the role he was so excited about it he just called the movie John Wick a lot and that's why they decided to change the name. Originally it was title scorn. That's a fun fact part. Thank you. It is fun. I'm fun your phone. Thank you. It was influenced by the NEON air neon noir genre and Stephen King, and it was Keanu Reeves who got David Leach and chats to hell sky, who were stunt performers on the Matrix trilogy as well as Second Unit directors later on in the film industry. They did a lot of work for the witch how skis, who did the Matrix trilogy, and he was the one that got them on board to direct. This is their first. This is their directorial debut. Chats to house. Key was the only credited director. Because of directors guild of America rules, Leach was given a producers credit. Filming was mostly took place in New York. Some stuff was taken place in that Long Island, some stuff was with Queens, some stuff was in Manhattan. So all around a New York Film. So New York is also known as the big apples. That correct. Like the is it the concrete jungle? Is it like the city that never sleeps? Yeah, the way. Is it the city so nice they named it twice? Okay, I'm out of example, so I'm glad you stopped me. It was released in two thousand and fourteen. It had a budget of twenty to thirty million dollars. In it was what was considered a sleeper hit. It made eighty six million dollars, a financial success. HMM, you heard it here first, folks, it's true, ended up with more money than they started with and they had some fun in the process. But that's all the production history that I was able to find online. But maybe we should get some behind the scenes on the costume design for this movie. Who could we possibly talk to to hear more about that. I've I don't know, do you? I'm glad you asked this. It's in case you didn't remember, we actually interviewed the costume designer for John Wick. Wait, whack, wait, wasn't the costume designer Luca Mosca? or My am I imagining things? We had a great conversation with him, didn't we? It's all coming back. Yeah, we actually are gonna cut to that interview, now that I remember we had one. So now on to our route interview with costume designer Luka Mosca. Hello, everybody, and welcome to our interview with the amazing Luca Mosca, the costume designer for such films as premium rush, the last witch hunter, skyscraper and, of course, the John Wick trilogy. We're super excited to be talking with him and to learn from his expertise. Thanks for being here. Thank you for having me. I'm honored and humbled by the beautiful introduction. Thank you, of course. So we generally start off by just asking our guests how they got involved with the film industry, like where that sort of passion started. The way my career in film started was completely accidental and unplanned, coming from the world of fashion from Italian, couldtur specifically, and have been recently moved to the United States. From Italy. A producer approached us, my former business partner and I approached us, asking to volunteer, if you, pieces of clothing from our fashion line for his upcoming small budget movie. It was a two hundred and Fiftyzero dollar budget movie and we accepted. And then we were offered to maybe design...

...the entire movie, and it's a yes, why not, let's do it. And the same producer called us to do the following movie, which was a beautiful he hamlet, hamlet to thousand, where the ETHERN colock exactly playing hamlet in Bill Murray being the spin doctor. And so that was a great opportunity to do a small budget and independent movie that would eventually get a lot of acclaim and visibility and sort of John Start my career as a costume designer. So from what was a completely casual and unplanned a moment of donating a couple of dresses to a small independent production, here you go find it myself and working with Sam Shepherd as the ghost and I am Vanara and Julia styles and an incredible cast into my my career has been in the name of incredible and generals opportunities, people who trusted me to always do something bigger than my credential would suggest that I would be able to do, and and that's been the case for all the following movies. And here I am now and I have a decent career designing great, great projects with what the best talent in the world. So we did a little research and saw that you studied pharmacy in college and we just wanted to know how you got into fashion after that being your education. I am indeed a pharmacist. That was not my vocation. That was imposed upon me by very traditional family that couldn't understand how would the pharmacy in in the family one could dream of being involved with fashion and with the instability of freelance work, and so I had to oblige and my medical studies were very hard. I cannot deny that. I'm also very proud that I achieved such a difficult goal. But at the end of my medical studies I had to tell my family done, I'm done and I'm not going to work in the family business. And I had this great opportunity to work in a in a COUTUR company in Italy at the time, producing the likes of Helmut Lang, Catherine Hamnet, Romeo, Gillian, Norma Kamali, and I ended up following the Colagan Line, but also Norma Kamali based in New York, and dream come true. I was crossing the pond every couple of weeks and I became very familiar with New York and eventually setting up shop there became very natural, very organic, and we started a clothing line and that's how the whole career unfolded and he moved from Chemistry and Physics to fashion, to costumes and and it's still evolving. Don't tell it's not over, but for now we are still doing movies. Yet we still are I am at least. My parents are both science majors and have like two masters and science, so going into the arts of something I can empathize with. So we just kind of were wondering if you could explain what your parameters or job description...

...of a costume designer would be or how you would describe that job. The costume designer is the person who is responsible for the look of every single actor, every single person that shows up in front of the camera and that applies to your lead actor, to your supporting actors, to your minor roles and to all the background actors that you have in the movie. And it starts. My work starts in preproduction with the script that I read and dissected and analyze in all the mouse minor details. I tried to pick up all the possible information that I got from the script, and then I start make creative conversation with the director, you know that, to bring her or his swechion in front of the camera, and at that point we start a massive visual research with according a depending on the movie, with period or contemporary or ethnic photograph, photographs, and then with illustrations, and then building samples, collecting fabrics and and any kind of materials accessories, and then eventually moving on to the to the human body, and get in the first actors into the fitting rooms and trying close on them, taking beautiful photographs and and making sure that everything looks right, fits okay and and last but not least, that your budget is also handled with care. When you do a movie, you don't necessarily have a billion dollars of disposable budget, so you had to keep an eye on your spending and prioritize and make sure that all your most important actors and scenes are taking care of and you have to see where you need to sometimes compromise, and that is, in a nutshell, the work that we do over the span of many months in order to bring all these actors in front of the camera. Obviously, once the costumes are ready, the task of the costume designer is to be on set with the actor and with the costume the first time that he or she wears the costume, make sure that it works and then eventually follow the progress of the costume in a movie like and I'll make the example of John Wick, because it is very easy to understand in the in the case where there is a lot of wear and tear of the costume. And so, even if you have the impression of seeing the same suit that gets burn't and torn and slashed and pierced the by bullets, those in reality are many different costumes that are all prepared in different stages of distress and and that all need to be coordinated and supervised. So, and we have been talking about my work up to now, obviously there is an army of people, army, an army of super competent, qualified, laborious, hard working people who so who die, who staying, who distress, who stay on set for long shooting hours and make sure that everything is properly maintained, executed and shot in continuity. So it really takes a village in order to put this together. And at the end of the movie or...

...at the beginning of the movie, you see the big title page that says costumes by and you see the name of the costume designer. Their reality is that there is a lot more than that one person to to all the crews that I worked with my my utmost and heartfelt gratitude. That's that's great. So so when, when working on something like John Wick, what what kind of communication do you have to keep with your obviously you have your main actors and you have your director and your cinematographers, which are all responsible for what's apparent in the frame. And so what input to those three levels of people have on your work and what kind of collaboration happens there? And John Wick specifically and just in general, the director is my ultimate boss, so that's a person I need to respond to and because of my personal relationship with Chad, the healths geme and and also with Dave Leach in the case of John Wick one, because Chad and Dave were code directing John Wick One. The the communication is constant, so every time I have a fitting, I immediately rush or dropbox or share some way or another, the photos, the fitting photos, with the director. I personally enjoyed the company of the direct are during the most important fittings because at that point he can be vocal together with the leading actors and we can all make a decision quickly in the same room. And you were asking me also about the DP, the director of photography and the production design. I love working with both of them. I want to now what the likes and dislikes for a DPRE the basics will what is your relationship with very dark colors, or how do you like white? Does White? Can White be white, or you would rather have my whites be off white? And, quote unquote, Te died and and we also test fabrics to see the reaction on camera. Sometimes you upgrade to a new technology, and this is happening all the time with technology moving so fast, and you want to see what this new Alexa is doing and how it's reading your navies or your dark grays, or is that fabric going two more ray to move in a funny way in front of the Lens? So this is a very important process that happens with the director photography and with the production designer also. I love to work very closely because it's important for both to now how our colors are going to interact. Is it going to give me a red wall and I'm going to give them a red costume? Is this going to be a problem? Or maybe not, because maybe that's exactly what we want to do. We want the actor to blend into the red background, or maybe not, and so my costume can become green if we really wanted to stand up spend out in front of the red background. So I like to visit set during the making, during the planning. I like to see photos and sketches and and share my costume concepts for for that very reason, I think that it's very symbiotic their relationship that happens among all the department rent of...

...a movie, and we all use one another as tools in our tool bag to achieve the perfect result and to bring the director's vision in front of the camera. So we were wondering if you design costumes based on the actor or the character and the script, or is it a combination of the two? It is always a combination of the two. You have to have an idea of what the body type is and once I get the measurement from the actor, I immediately got some information about what kind of fit I can afford or I should design for that specific body type. So this is a conversation to be had also with the actor. Actors will oftentimes inform me of what works and what doesn't work on them. They know their body. That happen with their body for much longer than myself and in also, the character is important in the costume. Of course. Is it the blue color? TYPE OF CHARACTER? Is that? It's leaks were hero. So all of those factors have to do with eventually what becomes the costume. Colors also or very important. I can convey a lot through color. I can give or take away power from a character by using specific colors. I can make a character lovable, scary, repulsive, all of that, but just using color and texture and fabrics. So yeah, it all depends both both the actor and the character as it is described in the script. Inform my decision of building a specific costume. One of the things that I was wondering was on something like John Wick specifically, like you were saying, you kind of have several different versions of the suit as the as it progresses throughout the film, and I was wondering on John Wick specifically, how many versions of that are there? And obviously you need to be considering both form and function. And so how do you design considering the practical, practical needs that the action in these movies require? The multiples, as we call them in my industry, of each costume are definitely one of the most fascinating aspects of the making of an action movie like John Wick High. I don't remember the exact account of suits that we had for for the character of John Wick, but I think that for his main costume in John Wick three, we had about ninety. And so if you of those costumes are allocated to Keanu reads, to the actor himself, a few of them are in the proper size. If you are then may contain gussets or added little pieces of fabric to allow for the extreme movement needed for when you need to lift an arm or kick a leg up in midair. And but that's only a small part of the costumes and maybe some costumes are in a slightly larger size to allow for pads, to allow for...

...harnesses. But then there is an enormous amount of costumes that are allocated to the stunts that play John Wick. and some stunts maybe exactly the same size as Keano, but some of them may be shorter or taller, maybe maybe even larger than he is, because Keyano is extremely fat. And for example, in John Wick three you saw these horseback riding scenes and the Guy Right that was trained to ride the worse in the extreme scenes is a guy that is a completely different size from pianos, and so you need to keep that in mind. Also, you have to put a very big pad underneath the shirt and the jacket and then cut a hole through the jacket in order to attach a harness. So size is range wild links. And then you had to keep into consideration that the beginning of the scene, at the top of the scene, the castume is pristine and clean and pressed, but then it gets wet because John Wick is walking in the rain and that knee gets bloody and maybe it's even bloody from the previous movie from John Wick to and so you have to pick it up from where where you have left it. So they stain. The blood stain on on John Wicks white shirt is almost like preprinted on a on a dozen shirts, and eventually we add more blood to it based on how many minutes or how many hours there are between the beginning and the end of the scene. And and the color of the blood also may change based on on time. Fresh blood is more intense and more red, and older blood tends to be more Brown. And so the the multiples, these enormous amount of multiples needed to make an action movie, are one of the things that fascinate the most people who come in with it the wardrobe rooms or the wardrobe truck. It is it is kind of incredible to see the same costume repeated obsessively for wrecks and racks, and it is also where much of the budget is spent, and it is spent in a non visible way, meaning the audience doesn't necessarily understand that in order to see that one costume you have to prepare Niny of them. But it is definitely a beautiful site, even for myself, to see all those shoes, all those suits, sold those shirts, all hanging from the racks. It's a is a very fascinating site. So I was wondering, as you've worked on consecutive films and a franchise, when doing John Wick to are, do you tackle that as its own entity or are you thinking about it as an extension of the preceding one, especially through like the tone changes that John Wick two and three have compared to the first? It is probably both. It is beautiful to consider each meal movie as its own entity, but you are dealing here with something that has been built before. Now. The elating feeling of going into a John Wick to brought that than a John Wick three, is that your hard work has paid off and the movie that started off as a somewhat independent feature that not too many people believed in has been a worldwide blockbuster. And...

...and now you are called back as a part of that successful design team to make number two. So obviously you created a formula that needs to be continued and and you can just add on and and for me it's more like going to town with it and doing more, because I think that for John Wick, the more the better, and and just employing all your creativity and and designing the most beautiful, the most creative costumes. And so, to go back to your original question, yeah, both take it as its own, but it's a franchise. It's a known entity and what you have done before was right, so continue it and do it better. That's awesome. So kind of talking about it as a franchise. The first film was a pretty low budget for an action movie. It was a budget of like twenty minute, twenty million dollars or so, and each consecutive sequel has sort of doubled that the budget of its predecessor. So we were wondering how an increased budget like that affects your workflow, how, more than affects it, let's say, how it allows for more freedom, for more creativity. So in in John Wick too, you could see that we we left the continent, we went to Rome, we shot in Rome, we took the historic baths of Cara Cola and we put thousands of extras and I dressed all of them, and it takes a huge budget in order to do that. So that they the bigger budget allowed me to do things that in in a movie like John Wick One, we're impossible. Now what I'm very proud of is that in John Wick one. We use creativity to replace money. Whenever there was not enough money, we figured out a way how to do things in a constant, factive way and to put in front of the camera a movie that was richer and more expensive than the movie that we were actually making. So I am very, very proud of that and I think that my philosophy was really appreciated by the directors. were very vocal about that and they really liked about. Liked that about me and my team, the capacity of saying, okay, this is what I have, let's do it, and so yes, this is what the bigger budget has allowed me to do. Like you were just talking about, with having the dress like a thousand extras for that scene in John Wick to are you as meticulous in dressing the background characters as you are with like the key players? So of course when you fit Hollyberry or Angelica Houston, you pay more attention than when you're fitting waiter for the Continental Hotel in Morocco. But the same obsessive attention goes into the designing of the costumes, into finding the right fabrics, the right trims. All the work is done ahead of time because when, when the day of the shoot comes and you're hit by thousands of background actors. There is not too much time to be meticulous about fit, even if most of the actors, background actors, are pret fit. So so Keanu Reeves get all of my attention and so do all the most important numbered actors. But I also like to make...

...sure that the costumes for the complimental hotel, for the party scenes, for the continental waiders, for this stuff, are designed to be on the same level. So they are. There are literally months of research, of building off shopping for all the background. That's super cool. We kind of stalked your IMDB profile and were able to see that you've worked on a lot of films that have been produced by lions gate and we were wondering, is is that a coincidence or or are is like our costume designers kept on by like a certain studio, because I know with like composers, sometimes it can kind of be like that. So you're wondering about that. Yes, I think I am not the executive producer at lions gate, or another good example would be Sony Columbia, I have done a lot of work for as well. I am not the producer. I am not the person who hires, but when I see that my costume designer, look a MASCA, is dealing with or my cast, all the crew, the budget, the director in a seamless, non drama producing way, his costumes are always delivered in front of the camera on a timely manner, everybody is happy, the movie has commercial acclaim and that's that's the reason why, as a producer, I would want to go back to that same guy, because I think that my qualities are very precious when it comes to a large production where you have no time to waste, no time to make mistakes and experiment or replacement. So I pride myself with being the reliable person who who rolls up into the same person, many, many persons, many professional persons, the person who knows how to deal with the actor to make the actors happy, the person who knows how to deal with the director, the person who is kind and respectful to the producers and do can manage the budget and all of that. And that's my attitude and hopefully there will be many more callbacks. So, changing gears a little bit, Keanu reeves is like famously like one of the nicest actors in Hollywood, and also you've recently worked with some other big name actors like Laurence Fishburne and Dwayne right Johnson and skyscraper, so well, working hands on with them. Do you ever get like a little star struck or do keep it strictly professional? That's my personal nature and I don't think I would say starstruck. But insecurity is, in total honesty, the driving force behind all of my work. I work ten times harder because I always think that I am not enough. What can I do? What can I do to satisfy the needs of of a of a Keanu Reeves, of the VIN diesel? They have seen it all, they have Laurence Fishburn they have done the matrix, they have done the best movies in the world. What can little a mini provide that it's going to be good enough for them? And so I work so hard, so hard. I do a lot of prep work, I...

...do a I do so much, and one thing that I would like to mention also that I am so proud up or my photographs. As you know, we need to take photos of the costumes in order to show them to the studio or rather than the director, etc. My I I have studied photography and at the point I call myself a profession of photographer. I have very sophisticated lights and equipment and I photograph Fashion Magazine Quality Pictures. They not just the usual standard polaroid type. Please stand in front of the wall because I need to show your costume to the director. So that goes with my sense of never being enough and and trying to always over achieve in order to be good enough. And and again that sense, that feeling or paying off. It's probably, yeah, working well. I'll speak for them and saying that you've done an amazing job with all of their costumes. But thank you. Thank you. Something exciting that happened on the first sequel to the first film was you were cast in the role of Keanu Reeves Taylor. Fitting. How unintended? How? How did how did that end up coming about, and what was that like? So just about I would say two weeks prior to the shooting of the movie, the director kind of made a joke about the tailor and in and and I don't remember exactly what he said, but I said, but can I please have have his phone number at least I need to speak with that out. There was a week before. I say the tailor could be a man or a woman. It could be a thin man, it could be at five hundred pound men, it could be a small woman, it could be a large woman. Give me, give me an idea, because if it is a guy and it is an Italian tailor, I want to put them in the three piece suit. Well, I'm talking with him, and now I remember. Yes, the director said, yes, I'm talking with him right now, and I said okay, so give me his phone number and I thought that he was saying that he was referring to the fact that he was in negotiations with them. And he says, I am talking with the tailor right now, and he looked into my eyes and and I honestly I wanted to faint in my first reaction was like I wanted to die. I wanted to say now. And so you get me the script and we had to do a little adjustment to the script and Keanu and I looked at it together. We rehearsed it together. I think that the studio didn't want to hire me and because I didn't have the credentials, but the director said, I wrote this role based on you and you are going to do it. And so people in the subway in New York probably thought I was crazy because I was reading my lines out loud and trying to memorize all this technical jargon. And in the day of the shoot happened. And and even if I felt my heart beating in the back of my throat and I thought I was going to die of a major coronary, it went very well. It was day one or shoot or John Wick too, and the whole crew knew me from John Wick one, so I had everybody on the set to see me. So it was it was a lot of excitement. And the director then said I want you to stop designing, I want you to act. I am very pleased with the performance. And that was something that had been said to me by James Dobach in a movie shot so many years prior, when you put me in the movie and he said...

Stop Designing, I want you to be an actor, and I said to myself, wow, why, I heard that twice already, so let me do something about it. And so ever since John Wick I, I started going to act in school. I got into Stella Addler School of acting and at that since I am training and acting on a weekly basis. I am in a theater group and I have been in a bunch of other independent projects. I have been in theater performances and stuff, and so that's what we said at the beginning of the career, right when we went from from chemistry to fashion to costumes and now possibly acting and who knows. Yeah, I think I will pick up ballet when I am in my s. Who knows? And but this is what the plate for me now. And yes, so I was wondering if you were able to disclose, if you are playing, if you're going to be the costume designer for John Wick for as well. Now that I cannot disclose, as you know. Also, there's a lot of uncertainty about the timing of John Mack for because it all depends on the Matrix and it all depends on whether the matrix were because Keanois plane in the bag of Beatrix Right, obviously you don't. Depends on when Bob Elsberg and Berlin and all of that reopen and he can go back to work. And so now I cannot talk about John Wick for yet. Fair enough, fair enough. Well, sort of speaking on that, we were wondering how the coronavirus has been treating you and your ability. I mean, obviously it's impeded on everybody's ability to work, but like have you been doing with that? The coronavirus crisis needed a little bit of a judgment from my side. First of all, I was very blessed that nobody in my circle of loved ones and friends was affected, neither here nor in Italy. My family, including my nine year old AD libs in the very epicenter of these tragedy in Italy and nobody was affected. So that was a blessing in that in it by itself. The little adjustment that I needed at the beginning, which was very difficult when I was afraid that I would die and that I wouldn't be able to help my ten year old son become a young adult and and and independent adult. The that adjudgment consisted in my unplugging. At some point. I realized that watching the news and reading the newspapers was toxic and for me I completely one hundred percent unplugged and and I started painting and sewing and sketching, and so now I can say that the past three months had been the most incredible, creative, beautiful time of my life. Incredibly, I have been cast to be in a in a web series, also as an actor doing some self taping, and so it has been any incredible time. And so, to answer your question, it has been amazingly beautiful. All. I think that's a great place to leave us off. Trent. You got any questions? No, that's all for now. Thanks. Thank you again for coming. We really appreciate your time. My big pleasure it's been. It's been great to share some of my experiencing costume design and Ney movies with...

...you guys, and I hope that some of your listeners world find these inspiring. For sure it was. It was wonderful talking with you. That was Luca Mosca, costume designer for the John Wick trilogy, and will we hope to see his work later. So that was Luca Mosca. We're super happy he was able to talk with us and make sure to check out his future work. So, parth, you know me and you we both we like this movie. I mean for them are. I will get to that later, but in the meantime I was looking at the Internet, you know, Google right and single thing. Some people felt differently. Out of five stars, they decided to give it one. But what did they say? Trent? Tell me. Yeah, so these are pulled firm amazoncom. These are some negative reviews that I thought were rather silly. This one's titled Violent. Their view says one star, very violent. Second Review. Subject. This is really bad content. First of all, you see what happens at the end of the movie. Thanks for that. They went to the extreme with each character and how they really, really really wanted you to hate a character or feel sorry for a character. God, they even killed a cute puppy to work up your emotions. Enough of that. I get it. They are bad guys and you're the good one. Shesh. Moving on subject. What a vile mess this person feels strongly. This movie is just horrible. I feel bad for the character at first, but after finding out he was a gangster, I feel less bad, and what he did has no justification. It's repetitive and gruesome, but I hated the dog dying. The entire movie is not believable and shallow, not to mention you totally overacted, even for someone in that state. They also didn't have to drag a church into this. Is Not so funny when the Church was the front for the Russian mob. This person values religion. Here at craft services, we believe in the word of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior. Well put. Moving on this one titled Seria a sleep content. This dude must kill sixty people in the movie and it is ten people if every line of Dialog Henu Reeves has for a car and a dog. The dog maybe absolutely ridiculous movie. Same audience watching. This is why they made nine of the fast and furious movies. If you graduated the eighth grade, you should not be interested in this movie. That's all I've got for reviews. Another thing I'll synthesize from reading a lot of one star reviews is a lot of people were just like I watched the first fifteen minutes and then the dog got killed and I was disgusted and I turned it off and I thought that was kind of ridiculous. And also there are a lot of people who were just like I like John Wick until I found out that he used to be a murderer and then he couldn't be my protagonist anymore. And I guess these people have never heard of an anti hero, little complicated storytelling. HMM, all right, well, that's enough negativity for one podcast. Let's get optimistic current. What were her initial feelings on this movie? For context, I've seen this movie. I saw this movie when it came out. I've seen this many, many, many times, and this was transfer spewing. Yeah, I was a John Wick Virgin, so to speak, and boy am I. I'm no longer that. He's he's deflowered me. Well, I I watch it last night and I have, I have some feelings, but overall, rather positive it was. It was objectively a great action movie. I mean the the it was a it was a joyous romp is the best way I can put it. I thought it was a condensed who it was like ninety minutes it it's like a hundred minutes. Yeah, sure, it moved fast. It kept me entertained. I think this movie, if counter reeves wasn't in, it could have been a be a b movie, but Keanu Reeves really escalated. Yeah, and well, we'll get into the the nitty gritty later on. How about how about you? Yeah, I pretty much feel the same, I think. Well, I mean I saw the trailers for this and I've...

...a big fan of Keanu reeves from when I was a kid. And I've watched the Matrix and I've loved them ever since. Everybody seems to really like him in the industry. Seems to be a very nice person. Yeah, in the past five years there's been like a canter reeves renaissance. Just he's the Internet's like dad now, if you haven't heard, and he's very he's very committed to his roles. You know, in the Matrix you can see him do most of the action work, doing stuff like that. Same thing here, and it's the same thing here. I agree without Keanu Reeves and kind of Keanu reeves gets a lot of shit for being like an up great actor. I think he's really great here and I think he has an inherent likability. Nobody like hates Keanu Reeve. You may not like him, but you make you don't. You don't hate him, you know, and I think that really helps with this. When I first saw this, I saw this in theaters with my dad and two other friends of mine and it was awesome. I was blown away, MMM and I've I've since. It was the first BLU ray I ever bought with my own money. Historic moment, it's true, and it's it's a very special movie for me. It was for transformative for me because it was a movie that sort of I've always been a fan of action movies and then this was a movie where is like, Oh, I want to like understand how they made this. And Yeah, I mean I love this movie. I'm kind of amazed they made this for twenty million dollars. It looks very economical. Yeah, they really stretched it. Yeah, I guess we can talk about the direction. Sure. The one thing that popped out to me was the editing style. was very unique and like I liked the on screen text. I thought that was an interesting touch. I thought the transitions were cool. They did a lot of like wipe screens into the next scene. There's a lot of cross cutting, which I enjoyed. It kept it fresh. I never did a scene go on for too long. It didn't give you a chance to get board, which was something I valued. Yeah, I think that with action movie specifically, I think that I've always thought is I mean I didn't think this. There's a channel called the red red letter media that's say this way to cite your sources, but they're absolutely right with this, which is that a movie doesn't necessarily need to be smart but it should be smartly made. HMM, and I think this is an example. This is not a very complicated movie, but there's lots of filming techniques like cross cutting. The cinematography is really great. Some some place to say that this was shot in thirty five millimeter films, someplace to say this is shot digitally. I think it's on film, but really I know very little about this, but if I were to guess, I would say it was digital. I just I've seen it. I've seen that it was shot on film and more sources than I have that it was on digital. On wikipedia it says both, but but like maybe it was like the room where they did both. Perhaps, but it's it's it's a really it's a tear above most other action movies. Visually, it's got this really great neon esthetic. Yes, there's a very distinct color scheme and also there's a lot of like interesting like aerial shots. There's school like tracking shots. Action sequences are very well done. There's and, like you said, with the editing. This had a really big impact on action movies, like low budget action movies, I think because in two thousand and fourteen we were still getting the like super close up, super shaky, super you can't really tell what's going on. That type of action movie that came out of the police. I was just going to say, like the Bourne identity is like famous for that sort of like yeah, shaky cam at like fight sequence to the point where you don't know. You're complete spatially disoriented and you like I know that they're punching each other, but I don't know like why or how. I think the Bourne movies do it well, or they mostly do it well. Sometimes it goes a little overboard and like this provacy. But but the Bourne movies do it well because they're made by filmmakers that like understand why they're doing it and it's a stylistic thing, whereas when it was adopted by other filmmakers it was used to hide the fact that they had no fucking clue with the flaws, yea. And here you get these really awesome wide shots of Keanu Reeves doing is fucking thing, you know, like yeah, the choreography is very elaborate and and well done and just like the shots carry on for so long that it isn't it isn't cutting it. Every chance it gets it. It gives you sometimes I appreciate all the all that combat.

This movie was one of the I think this was the movie that invented Gunfoo and explain to me and our listeners what that is. It's kind of just like this style of fighting in which guns used in really interesting kind of like you do like trick shots and basketball. It's sort of like interesting comparison, but it's like you try to see, like what interesting ways you can do use your gun, you know. Yeah, I see the the parallel between like, I don't know, say like this is like kill bill, but with guns, or like any other like Samurai movie. Yeah, or or if it wasn't with guns, they just be like kicking and punching each other. It's all pretty much close combat stuff going on, you know, and I think it really shows that this was made by two stunt performers and stunt coordinators. Yeah, because that's where their priorities lay and they have a lot of experience in that department and it's I think it's really awesome that this became a success. Is, if this hadn't become a success, I don't know what the state of action movies, like lower budgeted action movies, would be, because this kind of raise the bar. It kind of says a little bucket and blazed a trail. Yeah, it's a it's a trailblazer and I think it's like you said, the fact that was made for twenty million dollars is really crazy to me because of just how well produced it is. You know, and Willem Dafoe isn't it? Yeah, and it has these great Ian McShane is in it, will in, Dafoe'es in it, Keanu reeves is in it. Yeah, the Bench of this movie is very deep. Yeah, and it's a very Ernie Hudson from ghostbusters in it. Rather briefly, is he? Yeah, I think so. He's. He's the guy from the hotel who that's just another black guy. You Racist. We're going to have to cut this. No, we can't cut this. Trent stop, I'm embarrassed. It's not really looks a lot like him. Dude, he's bald. What are you talking about? Okay, well, luckily I edit this, so will. So we'll see about that, but I guess disregard that comment. I was going to after we condemned racism not five minutes earlier. Now we need to keep this in. This was a slip up. I'm not perfect. Let it be known. Let Their record reflect. It's a guy named Lance Reddick, I think is his name, and he show choir on HBO, Really Making Me Look Bad. Yeah, by knowing all about him, but every but it has a really stacked cast, you know, and it kind of shows like twenty million dollars isn't a hindrance. I mean, I'm sure they went they did go through a lot, and that isn't necessarily the most amount of money, but I mean lots of action movies that are made for a hundred million dollars look a lot worse than this and have a lot worse action than this. You know part you know a lot about this movie and this is my first time. So I wrote some questions as I was going and can I ask them to you and maybe you can provide the answer? Yes, please. So when John Wick, the titular character, he gets the dog out of the cage and he looks at his collar and it's named daisy and he's like Oh, of course, at what? Why? Why is that? Of course, I don't know his wife. I don't know. Oh, okay, I was confused by that. Okay, so I think deal. All right, I guess it's just a thrill. Maybe, of course, like Oh, he gave like the dog or she gave the dog to him and whatever. Next question. Who What happens to the second car that John Wick has that are really oh, gives him because they're at this movie. People are just given him cars, is left and right. That's actually mildly, like a very mild plot point in the second movie. What that? The second car is recovered? Yeah, also, I'm surprised the first car, which is what like kind of set this into motion, isn't mentioned again. HMM. Is it ever recovered? Well, well, again it's. That's in the second movie. Oh, okay, but very mildly to be fair, but it is. It is there. But this movie doesn't set up a sequel or a throat wall. It think it's got it. Yeah, it just happened to be so successful that it could and it could justify those and it has this really interesting...

...underworld happening. Yeah, it sets up an entire it sets up a whole world of like everyday thogus that I didn't know existed. But basically it just like it's just like the Russian mob. Or is it supposed to be like more complex than that. It's sort of like this. The way this works, so far as I understand it, is there is this group of hit men and we kind of learned more about in the second third movie. So I don't want to like because we'll get to those eventually those, but basically, for the purposes of this movie, there is a lot of hit men and women that do their thing and the continental is this safe haven. Yeah, hotel where when there's that bred iron building, I think it is the daily Bugle and the Spiderman films. Yes, but so. So that's like a safe, safe haven for them, and they use gold coins as this sort of currency kind of. I was going to ask about that. It's don't think too much of the directors have spoken on it. It's not really so much like that. There is a specific value amount attached to it or so. Oh, so you're in on this, like if you have to think about how much it costs your probably shouldn't be having coins. Yeah, I was. I briefly thought about this and I was like John Wick for his two nights at the continental handed him to coins, but then also to get into like the dance party thing, he paid one coin and also, like, I was just confused on the value of one individual coin for the guy to clean up his house. Yeah, and also, are they like made of gold? It's not really important. It's more so just meant to be like, Oh, the secret society has their own form of currency. I'm happy that the Russian mobsters actually speak in Russian and then they just put subtitles, because I really don't like movies where it'll be like it's German terrorists but they're all fluent in English. I guess we should then just get into story. Let's just let's just dive in, but there's not much here. But what do you think? I had just have a few more like perimeter comments that I'll make. I thought. Well, first of all, how did the thugs know where Joan Wick lived from the gas station? Maybe they followed him, I don't know. All right. Second thing, I thought that the story, you may disagree with this, had too many like temporary characters, and I'll name the example, like Perkins Winston and a really Oh, I don't know if they're in the follow up movies, eyes Purticans gets shot. Yes, I know, but I just they're just like in it to serve like and the guy who I thought was Ernie Hudson him too. It is like they're in like one seeing, they have like one conversation, they provided key piece of information or not, and then they either die or they're forgotten. Um, I kind of disagree. I mean, I don't know that's a disagreement. I guess it's just a thing of taste, but for me it's like I kind of like that there are these sort of periphery characters and it's like it kind of helps seal the deal that, oh, this is a fully formed world that he's re entering and are would be all of these side characters, you know what I mean. So I kind of like the fact that there's these established relationships that we kind of don't like. No, like kind of a weird example to be making, but it kind of reminds me of Star Wars, where you don't need the explanation for all of the things. It's just sort of this world exists and it's lived in and it has its rules and we're just in it and I kind of like all these side characters because it's like, well, they mean something could John Wick? We don't necessarily need to know what they mean, but they're there. What do you think of the script broadly, or than the screenplay for being technical? I think it's efficient. I think it's exactly what it needs to be. Only only problem there's not really that much to talk about with story, I think. I think the only thing is the dog dying and the ending. I think the dialog is like a step above most action movies of this class. Like I think it's more fun. It has this sort of fun like pulpy comic book a like thing. Yeah, they're there. Are a few times I thought it was really witty and then a few other times, or I guess the rest of time, it was kind of just on cruise control and I thought it did what it had to, but it...

...wasn't. It wasn't wowing me. But when you sign up for a ninety minute action movie, am I asking for Aaron Sorkin Dialog? No, that'd be an UN their expectation. Yeah, I think it's. It's, I guess, sort of going back to the esthetic of the movie. It's really like a graphic novel, which is something they it's like the directors of outwardly stated that that's something that they wanted to do that. You can feel that influence. You can see it in the framing, you can see it in the editing kind of and another shot choices and I think I think it's a really cool thing that for the first half hour there is no action. It is all character building, which is something. First Half Hour. He gets well, he has beaten up and like the well, it's really action sequence, though. Yeah, true, it's pretty onesided all, like his wife is dead. He's warning his wife, his he gets this dog and there's this little fun like Oh, he likes the dog, the dog is cute and whatever, and then the dog dies and then it's like he goes and asks who this who the person was? They killed him, that killed the dog, and it's this fun. Were not fun. But it's this half hour pretty much of no action happening, which makes when which makes it all the more when they kicking the high gear. I think that first action sequence is still one of my favorite action sequences in the franchise. And this franchise gets crazy. Is that when the the twelve died. Yeah, I thought a character dynamic that I thought was really interesting was between like Vgo and his son and how vigo kind of like like Bant, like he like expected his son to die. Well, he like saught. He sided with John, saying that, like you shouldn't have done this and being like this is going to get you killed, when in most movies, like the father just like hey, we're gonna get him. You you hurt my son. And then also how he tries to like settle it diplomatically because he knows that he's in the wrong. And now he in the end he gives up his son. It's just so he'll be so he can survive, just to like cross him again. So and then he ends up being being killed, even though he must have known that this was going to happen, because he told us some that he can basically like guarantee he was guaranteed death. I think it's more so that at that point, you know, John had sort of destroyed all of that stuff at the church. Yeah, so he was worth much love. This time he kills his hee, ruins all of his political whatever leverage, and Blah, blah, blah. And money. Also, this guy has, like, I don't like, seventy hit men and ours seventy goons, and they're all dead now. So he would have to do a lot of recruiting to get back on his feet. I think the head count for this movie is eighty eight people. Jeez, I don't think it was like gratuitous, though, like I'm neither. I was like on board for all this violence. It's other than like the language, like there's a few F bombs thrown in there, but other than the language and the digital blood. I was just going to say I don't adore this CGI blood. It's a problem and it doesn't necessarily get better. Also, people like don't really Belid, like, what do you mean? Okay, do you know when they're in like the bath house? HMM, John Wick shoots a bunch of people and they're like in pools and usually you fall into the pool and then you start leaking blood, because that tends to happen there. Okay, rewatch it, but I'm sure there's blood in there. But, but I mean sort of speaking on I'm willing to forgive because moving on the clubhouse, I mean I think that the home invasion the clubhouse are some of the best action sequences ever. I think they're awesome. They're really well choreographed. You can see exactly what's happening. You know, there's lots of fun things that he does with his gun and yes, I think the club has specifically there's a lot of variety and like what he does. It isn't it doesn't fall into the trap of keeping John Wick do like having him do the same thing over and over again that I think other less acomplished directors would. He keeps it fresh. She keeps finding new and unique ways to kill his enemies. Yeah, which as a viewer I appreciate exactly. I think for the story. My one issue is ends too quickly and it's got the it's not got the best like show off at the end. I don't how do you feel about the...

...beginning like being the end? You know what I mean? Yeah, I mean I don't have an issue with it. It's kind of just like an editing technique. Be Like, Oh, what happened here, and I think, how did we get to this point? I think that wasn't a thing in the script. I think that was a thing where when they edited the movie they were like this opens on John Doing nothing. Yeah, I just think they were like people are going to get bored in the first ten minutes and they're going to leave the theater because they're going to be like we signed up for an action movie and nothing's happening. Yeah, I have no pride. Really don't have an issue with it. It's an adding con editing conceit whatever you want to one one thing, I think it's a little cheesy. Heart him watching the video of him and his wife. Also, just like the exchange there is really stiff. It just like Hey John, what are you doing? And he's like looking at you, and then she's like come here, and then he records them kissing and then he like watches that a lot and it's like, I don't know, if my wife died, I might just like think about her. You know, I know, it's a storytelling device. It's telling the audience they were in love and then it's her death was tragic. I can forgive it because the point of the movie isn't the drama of Yes, you know it's it's it does what it needs to do kind of clunkily, but but I thought by contrast within the first five minutes you totally understand like the wife died and he's sad about it and he's alone now, and I thought that doing the recording thing was overkill. That's fair. That's fair. Another technicality, I guess. Why? Just Wilm Dafoe. What's in it? Marcus, he accepts the contract to kill John Wick when he has no intention to. Is that correct? Yeah, I think it's just so because he knows that other people are going to be doing the hit on him. So, but he put himself in a position to have vigo murder him. Missy, when Vigo came and offered him the job, he should really hey, and he ve go knew that they were friends. He should be like no, I'm not interested in that. And then he could have protected him with no stre thanks attached. And now he knows that people are going to be after John but that's what ends up getting him killed at that's a fair criticism. Again, doesn't really matter. No, no, no, parth, I'm not too worried about it. I drew just have very few negative things to say. So I'm scraping the bottom of the barrel. Yeah, but I mean, I don't know that there's that much more to really talk about with story. It's a very simple movie. I think there's more to talk about with the second and third movie. I think I was content with the ending, being that he has a new dog. He gets a new dog and it's he he settled his his beef and now he's back where he started, but he should have closure. I guess he's currently Carlos, but I'm sure that won't last for long. Just a fun fact before we move on. HMM. Over the three movies, John Wick has killed three hundred six people, which exceeds Jason Voorhe is and Michael Myers combined, which I thought that crazy people at home should be aware of that. He's a dangerous guy. To keep your distance or he'll he'll kill you. Baba Yaga, Yep, the BOOGEYMAN. Well, he's actually the guy you sent to kill the boogeyman. Yeah, I watched away. Weird thing. They always call him Bobba Yaga and they're like, well, he's not really that anyways. It'd be like if I called you like the tiger and they're like, Oh, you call part the tiger of like no, but if there was a tiger, I would call parth in order to execute that tiger, and they big, well, that's a complicated nickname. You should just call him the tiger killer, like your king. Well, yeah, we'll put topical. All right, what next, I guess. I guess we should just give it a rating. Yeah, do you have anything more to say or can we just get into ratings? Let's get in ratings. Go first. I'm going to give this a seven and a half. I liked it. I for for an action movie, I thought it was great, but action movies aren't necessarily my cup of tea in the first place, so it was a little bit out of my comfort zone. But overall, I mean, what's not to like? But just there was something missing...

...that that maybe they'll find in the next two installments. Our next installment is John Wick chapter too. So how sequential of us and you again, I love this movie. The prepare for some bias. I also am a very big fan of action movies, and I'm going to get this an eight. That was conservative of you. Few years ago I might have given this a nine, but like, but that's that's the past part. But now, because of because of the sequels, which we can get into later, to the sequels make this one better for you. Yeah, I members each one, like up the Anti. Yes, they both so. John Wick two and three are more connected to each other than two is to one. Maybe one is the andalone movie. Is it in no, in the way that like back to the future, two and three are connected, because do you make the first one and you're like, well, who knows if this is going to succeed and and and require a second one? But then after and then when you're made the second one, like well, obviously this is going to do well, so we're going to interconnected with the third one. This wasn't two and three weren't shot back to back. Well, I I know that's specific, that back to the future. That wasn't like the plan with it. But but it they're more connected and the sequels kind of go deeper. I think the sequels become way more ambitious and that's why I think I guess the second eight point five. It does what it needs to do really well. It sets up with this really cool world, as some fun characters, really really good action and kind of changed, in my eyes, changed a lot of indie action movies. Not An easy feet. Well, I say we, we did John Wick. We did. So what's our next episode and who are we interviewing? Our next episode is surprise, surprise, John Wick to the logical following of John Wick One. It's going to be John Wick, chapter two, and we have an interesting guest for you next week. It's Richie Cohan and he is the trailer music composer. There you go, which is, you know, interesting fact that we haven't explored yet. So we'd like to thank Luca Mosca, the costume designer, who graciously talked to our lowly selves very insightful information. We appreciate your time and think that's all for now. Thanks for tuning in to this week's installment of craft services, the PODCAST. Actual listening guys. By.

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