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Episode 12 · 2 years ago

GONE GIRL (2014) Discussion with Sophia Alexis

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent talk with Sophia Alexis, Parth's 'friend' about the film Gone Girl.

Edited by Parth Marathe

So, Sophia, what have you been eating? Tell us. I had some ice cream today. Of what variety flavor? It was Americone Dream, which is actually it's like a Stephen Colbert specific and Ben and Jerry Specialty. It was. Again, it's delicious. Are you a been? Are you a Bena Jerry's Cornosa? We very nice. Yes, Steven Colbert is my late night host of choice. Hmm, I think Jimmy Fallon is overrated. I don't. I feel like nobody likes Jimmy Fallon. Yeah, nobody's overrating Jimmy Fallen. He's just rated. He had donald trump on his show also. Donald Donald Trump was the host of us and I like right before he ran, which I thought was the responsible. All right, what's the worst that could happen? Part what of you? Are you okay, Trent my I just had pizza. My Dad bought a pizza on the toppings and no, it's just like Mozzarella cheese and some sauce. Oh, did you? Did Your Father Cook it with his yeah, with his pizza oven, and it like it gets cooked in a minute. It was real lovely. Is the temperature rather high? It's like nine hundred something degrees. Oh, wow, dangerous. I guess that's how you cook a pizza and one minute. Yeah, you couldn't wait the standard fifteen. By cooking it for at three hundred, you're in a rum. I'm a hungry boy. Are there like stadings on the oven or does it just like it's no, it's probably nine hundred. It's it's not gradual. It's all or nothing. It's either room temperature or nine hundred. It does look pretty. We have it attached to a gas like tank, so you can heat it however much you want. You can also put like charcoal and like, but in the MARATI household down full blast. Yeah, we go crazy. Not a lot of patients, they're no, they need their pizza as quickly as possible, a sap, and they need to be able to turn out several pizzas in less than five minutes. Aside for my family's pizza eating habits, what have you been eating, Trent? I just really had quite the feast. I'm in New Brunswick right now, so I got some Tacodia and I had a UN burrit though. And what language is that? That sounds exotic. Espono, I got up to Spanish three in high school. But you're really cool now, Trent. That's sexy, you think. So. To be a bilangual, it's really a generous label. But it was delicious and I'm full and energized and nourished. I'm ready to fucking go. Let's podcast, so I guess let's queue the intro. Welcome back to craft services, the podcast where we talked about the movies. Each week we discussed the different film and hopefully have an interview with the crew member of that film to talk with us about their experience. We interviewed Vashi, editorial consultant of gone girl, in our last episode. Check it out. So this week we're going to discuss gone girl, the day Finscher feature from two thousand and fourteen, starring Ben Affleck and Rosamond Peak, based on a two thousand and twelve Jillian Flynn novel of the same name, and she wrote the screenplay. With us. We have a guest, Sophia Alexis, friend of parth. Welcome. That's your row, your title and the friend Earth. Yeah, did you like that Grand Introduction I gave you? Yeah, I appreciated it. I think it's important to note that I'm your first female guest you're the first female to ever be included in the podcast and we've had like nine or ten men. We're probably in the double digit for four men. Snow into good Nice. You did have a bad body count. You're spicing it up. Yeah, our ratio is bad. Yeah, really, ruckers, but we wouldn't get into a ruckers FRAT party having ten guys and one girl, and most of them are adult men in the film industry. I'm pretty cute. I could help. Yeah, so if you maybe you could do enough heavy lifting. Looks Wise. For like the ten of us, that'd be really a miracle. All right, parth, you're here too. That's Nice, Nice, nice to see you. Thank you well, Trent. Do you do? You want me to read a synopsis of Gone Girl? Please keep it to tooth sentences or less. With his wife's disappearance having become the focus of an intense media circus,...

...a man sees the spotlight turned on him when it's suspected that he may not have been innocent, making him guilty of murder. In Missouri, we're apparently they have the death penalty. Bummer. So the budget was sixty one million US dollars and the box office parth tell me? Well, I'll let you know that that made three hundred seventy million dollars, so like seven times their money. Good work, movie industry. You profited. This is a long production history you've you've drafted here. Well, I guess I'll quickly give a rundown of what happened. Gone Girl was a two thousand and twelve novel by Jillian Flynn. It was brought to the attention of reese witherspoon, who's originally going to play the main female lead, but now she was just a producer in the finished product. Yeah, so it got acquired by Twenty Century Fox. David fincher got attached to it. David fincher said, screw you, Reese Witherspoon, I'm going to put Rosamond Pike in it. I've never seen her in anything, have you? She's is running. She's in the First Jack reacher movie starring TC Tom Cruise, my faith, and and she's in Johnny English reborn. Well, everyone's seen that. So it's a good comedy and you should all check it out on anyways, most is a big it's a big step then. I mean, yeah, a huge movie. I mean she was never really like given much acclaim for any of her performances, but this one really brought her to next level. So then fincher basically spent a lot of time working with Jillian Flynn on her script, basically because he's an established director. And then she studies screenplay books, met with Steve Cloves, who wrote the screenplays for almost all the Harry Potter movies except for Order of the Phoenix. He provided giants the screenwriter for just that one. I've read that Steve Clothes he wrote like twenty or thirty pages but he's just like, I don't feel like it. And that was and they just got I think, Michael Goldberg or gold what he he did seven out of eight in a franchise. That's pretty wild. So she met with him, he helped her and she discussed with fincher over the phone and lots of scenes were rewritten a bunch of times. Lots of things from the book were distilled or cut out, and she worked on the film's ending a lot. She wrote a bunch of different versions of it and in her words, she said, once we got to the ending, I wanted it to wrap up quickly. I didn't want eight billion more loop de loups. I had no problem tossing stuff out and trying to figure out the best way to get there. Yeah, I wonder if the if the ending, is the same in the book. Do me now. Yeah, I have no real clue what happens in the book, but I've been told that it's a fairly faithful adaptation, which I you would think, what being written by the same person. Yeah, so, and being she was very involved and it wasn't just like a puppet just to put her name on it. Yeah, so interest she describes the end of her book is loop de Loops. Well, she was trying to avoid loop de loops because there'd been a looping it out of the star, to make the script not have a lot of loop de loose in the end, thus implying that the books had a lot of loop de loops in the end. Well, I feel like in a book you are allowed to have more loop de loops button already, and I would orgue movie. I like the I think the end needed to wrap up pretty pretty quickly, as it decided to do. I think pacing works really different in a book than it does in a movie. Like in a movie, especially once you get to those like last twenty minute it's you're like, okay, let's get to it. I think the difference between like a two and a half hour movie in a three hour movie is huge. Compared to like a book with two hundred fifty pages, it compared to like three hundred pages, like that's not that much. It's not asking that much more. Well, anyways, on September twenty and thirteen the they started filming establishing shots. They started principal photography on September fifteen and Missouri. A bunch of interior scenes were filmed in Los Angeles and according to producer Sean Cheffin, who is David fincher's wife, there were as many as fifty takes per scene, which is standard for fincher. Production shut down for four days when Affleck refused to wear a New York Yankees cap because he is a man of Boston. And Yeah, and then movie came out two thousand and fourteen. It was a pretty big success. And here we are. So this movie has some reviews on Amazon. People. I ought to say four percent of them are one one star, and we're going to read some. The first one is labeled one star, which is funny because you could have just looked at the stars for that. But it says great...

...start, good acting, but in all capitals it has an unrealistic and pathetic ending. Wasted two and a half hours. Okay, next one, one of the worst movies I've ever seen. I can't believe I made myself sit through this very poor, really made. I'm not expert in film, but it's unbelievable and has poor acting. The plot is violent. By the way, I read the book to just as bad. Ohmgee, exclamation point. Don't buy it. Exclamation point. Waste some myne exclamation point. All I can say is the positive reviewers are probably paid computers. Isn't that a handful? And then this one. It says a filthy movie, Dot Dot Dot. And this the reviewers, Janis G Joyce, which is quite the name, and she included a picture in her emoticon and it's seemingly a middle aged white woman and she's angry. It's as a filthy movie borders on Porno. I returned it. I don't allow filths like this in my home. Moving on. Well, those were some incredible reviews by some incredible people. Thank you. They're angry. Thank you. For bringing that to our attention. Now that we've talked about that, do we want to get into our own thoughts on the movie? Let's do it so, as always, let's start with direction, production, design and technical stuff. Sophia, you want to start? I don't know. What do I start? We have part. You're the film kid out of US three. It's true. All right, I guess. I guess I'll start. Thank you, part we appreciate it. You need to carry us to this portion the episode. This isn't for me, and so via thrive. It's true. I'm this is kind of standard David fincher technical aspects. Wise, as always, really good with cinematography, really good at editing, really good at shot composition, like on a fundamental, like filmmaking levels, it's a really, really well made movie. It's the same cinematographer, Jeff Cronan worth, who I guess has done the has been the doop for pretty much all of his movies since one thousand nine hundred and ninety nine, started with the fight club, and until most recently the music was done he was. He was actually there were some second unit shots for the movie seven that had to be done and the that movie cinematographer Darius Conji had some other movie to do, so they got Jeff Cronin with, who is the son of Jordan Cronan, with, who is the cinematographer of Blade runner and some a bunch of other classic movies. Who is originally slated to do alien three. Another David Fincher, say finchered? Yeah, but then he died, so he had to be out placed. How many times have you seen this movie everyone? I've seen it like for five times, something like that. That's impressive. Wow, for I seen it twice, once with part once today. I watch it once solow and then once the last night to refresh my memory. So I guess Solo you can tribute more taken away. So so here's why Solo, a star wars story, is relevant to our current conversation. No, I guess we'll just we'll leave. Will leave that for another time. Maybe we'll cover solo later. But so let can we talk about the cast? Yeah, let's sweet. I got Ben Affleck. Batman's in this movie, but this is this is pre Batman. This is true. I think everybody's well cast except for Neil Patrick Harris. Yeah, even thoughts. What about Tyler Perry. He's in this movie. I liked him. I think he's good in the movie. Like yeah, I don't know about his directing career, but yeah, this he's great. I don't know about Tyler Perry in general, but tell me about your wild animosity of Neil Patrick Harris. I like Neil Patrick Harris. I just don't know why he's in this movie. So I yea Sophia texted me. So IFIA texted me as she was watching this movie and she was like wait, why is Neil Patrick Harris? Who made that decision? Like I feel like somebody probably reach out to him and who wanted him? Like who's like this is our guy. I feel like Neil Patrick Harris at that point was most well known for like how I met your mother. That's like really all he's known from. I've like he's kind of trapped to that role. Yeah, but like he's really good in that show and he's like he is that kind of like charismatic ladies man, whatever, and always a homosexual man. But like, yes, this is true, he is in fact confirmed gay, but no need for further comment. Move On. But in this...

...in this movie, I feel like they've taken they've they've taken a person who's known for being like pretty, like big, he's like a he's like a theater guy, and then they put him in this really weird like, I don't know, like diminutive role and I don't look like it's such a little man in it. I don't know how to explain it better. Like that just doesn't who should put who should play that character? Is it has to be like a SIMP, you know, because that's all. Yeah, I feel like it needed to be more of like like a rich boy kind of vibe. He is rich. Yeah, what I agree with Sophia on this. He's not like he doesn't give to me. He doesn't give off to me like I'm a like I'm I'm really rich and like I don't care about other people's feelings. kind of he's just kind of like like there. I don't know. I think he's trapped to Barney Stinson in the same way that like Jim Parsons is trapped like Shelman Cooper. It's like they're so known for one thing in particular that it's weird when they're another stuff. Like Mark Hamill from Star Wars had this problem him too, although he broke out of it to a certain extent through voice work, because because Mark Hamill ended up becoming like the joker and he's like really good in it, and now he has two super recognizable roles. But yeah, he just couldn't be in live action stuff because he had his face. Was Luke Skywalker, as you know. Yeah, but like Neil Patrick Harris, I don't know, like have you seen the series us in the smurf movie? Oh, well, I know even movie. Isn't Jim Carrey in that? Well, that I don't remember which movie. This nurse movie. No, Jim Carrey isn't in that. is now. Isn't Jim Carrey in a series of unfortunate events? Oh, he's a series of unfortunate events of the movie, but your time a different rendition. There's a Netflix show came out a few years back in which Neil Patrick Harris plays the role that Jim Carrey did. Oh, and he's good in that. I think he's really good when he has like big roles to play, like kind of like theater, like. Yeah, he was a caged version. I like seeing him unleashed. All right, to continue on with the cast, I recently just learned that Emily Radachowski plays Andy, and I guess she's like a big model. Is that right? Can Own confer term? I'd like heard that name before. She's a famous person. She was in the blurred lines music video. She had no top. And then there's the music is by Trent resener of nine inch nails. I guess that's worth noting. He has the same name that I do, which is cool, but no further comment. Let's move on. All right. Well, I think we should maybe get into our thoughts on the actual story of this movie, Sophia, since you're are esteemed guest, it's Nice I have you. I kind of already know what you're going to say because I saw this movie with you once. Why don't? Why don't you tell us so? If he doesn't like this movie, guys, tell us about your thoughts on this film. I don't know where to be again. I think this movie is an anti victim movie and yeah, I really cannot, like agree with many of the decisions. Tell us more about that. Um, okay, so obviously she fakes getting raped two separate occasions. Yeah, she fakes spousal abuse. There's an so a big conversation in the whole movie is this discussion on abuse, like sexual abuse and like relationship abuse and stuff, and they use that in such a like weird way that really, I don't know, I couldn't agree with it. I think I guess the main what specifically about it? Can you agree? I think that it's making women like and victims look bad because they're saying that some people can fake it, which in this case is happens throughout the plot. Yeah, and it's okay. So here's my main issue. Is that it it I was obviously a huge movie. A lot of people known about it. It's rated pretty highly, a lot of money went into it and it made a lot of money and it is bigger than really any other movie that I can think of that features like women or people in general that have been abused or assaulted. So this is the primary narrative that people are being given from the film industry. So the movies that you watch kind of form the opinions in the way you take in the world, like as does all media. So when we watch a movie that...

...tells us, Oh, well, you should have been questioning the victim all along. How could you just believe her so easily, like you are an idiot for believing her. Obviously she was lying to you. Then it gives you this feeling that in the future, like going forwards, even if you don't realize it, you are now going to question victims, and I don't really feel like that's a positive narrative to be like take a message. Yeah, or I like especially like the most dominant message on the topic of abuse in the film industry right now, or like the biggest movie talking about abuse is like or movies like these and not movies about like People's experiences. Well put yeah, parth and iron men. So, like we didn't see that perspective at all. Well, I have to say it's it's all valid points. I mean, I feel like there are a lot more TV shows that talk about like survivors then like blockbuster Hollywood movies. Yeah, definitely. I have to say that I had seen this movie essentially when it came out and I was this is like when I was really getting into movies. So then I was really taken away with how it was like made, which it's really well constructed. The thing about it that I find is, if you look at on a on a narrative base, it's really cool how it plays with structure. The there's the twists in the four end of the first act and end of the second act are really cool just on a big pure narrative basis. Well, in the book they alternate chapters of the narrator, yes, which is where that came from, but in this movie I think it's more biased towards the Ben Affleck part. Yeah, and I think, or he at least he gets more screen time. And I think when I watched it for the first time I was like, Holy Shit, that's so cool, and part of that had to do with the fact that I was in eighth grade. I was like, Whoa, what an edgy movie. It is energy movie. I watched it for the first time two weeks ago and I felt that that angst. So then, when I so then, when I subsequently watched it, I that like the whole thing of like questioning victims and do we like, oh, should we really just immediately believe her? Because there's an entire scene in which she's explaining what was a faked like attempted murder on her to a to a bunch of police officers, and one, the One lady police officers like wait, what officer bony, that's your name. Is Her name, right? Isn't that funny? I doubt it. Decision and we just let them get away with that. But there's that whole scene and the there's the scene in which and she's just like wait, but wait, that's not adding up, and then everybody's like wait, shut up. Just like listen to her, can't you see that? She's so upset, and it is this after she's recovered and she's still yeah, I've covered in blood and hostel that. So then it's like what as we were watched, as I was watching it for the first time with Sophia, it had been sort of shown to me like Oh, it's telling you that the media tries to manipulate everything and you shouldn't wholeheartedly believe these survivors just because it can be manipulated. And Ben Affleck's character is portrayed as like Oh, yeah, I mean he cheated on her, but like, look at all these horrible things that happen to him. Look, look at what can happen, and it looks like there's you're obviously supposed to relate to his character and not the other woman's character, protagonist. Hmm and wait, I have a I have a choice quote from the movie that he gives. please. Oh, she took notes, share. I don't quote. He said this and I just couldn't ready. And this is treated as like true. He goes, I'm so sick of being a part by women. No, no, he says. I'm sick of being ripped apart by women. I'm so sorry, but it's okay. It's like here's the thing. From what I've heard, my mom read the book and she is my mom's a psychologist and she also had a big problem with the book as well. But from what I've heard, the book is more like they're both kind of in the wrong. She's just more in the wrong, like he's a worse person in the book, where the downfall of their marriage means she's in the wrong throughout this movie. Yes, but I I think in the book there's a bigger problem with him cheating and potentially like abusing her. I'm not I'm not entirely certain, but there's certain way. Does you smack the shit at her at least once? Yeah, Um, and so he and he is supposed to be a misogynist in the book. That's kind of a big point of it. Is that he is a misogynist in the book, but in the movie we don't really get that...

...so much. So it's just kind of like something he says and we're all supposed to be like, oh, okay, like they describe the woman on TV as a blond Bimbo. The whole time that other woman that like is pretends to be her friend and then robs her, like it's just like the whole narrative is either women are idiots and Bimbos, blond bimbos, or they are evil and conniving and will backstab you. Yeah, are there any? I've like? Officer Bony is the best example of like a strong woman and I can't be her real name. Is that her name of the movie? I swear you in fact check me. Mother's no name. I saw in the subtitles and I made an impression. Also, officer Bony's assistant. What he's the actor from almost famous. His name Patrick fuget. Have you seen that movie? No, Sovie of you. If not, we can move on. Fuck it. Never mind. One of the officers is from this one show. What is it called? I don't know. It's like a team show. In his name is mouth. Good Point, just the topic of like the book versus the movie. From what I haven't read the book, but I did read a lot of in preparation for this discussion. I read a bunch of articles that came out about the movie, because the initial response to the movie was, yeah, it's a really good movie, but what is it saying and how do we feel about what it's saying? So there's a bunch of articles about weight. Is this misogynistic? Is it? And it was a highly contested movie, like so few was saying. Sorry, I don't make Nick's character out to be a misogynist. I just think he's like he's a good guy, but he's had a few like slip up. So that's where it's like, yeah, using as to his like his connotation, because and in the book, from what I read, there's more shown that like on their like third anniversary he goes to like strip clubs and because you can in the in a book, you can sort of be give an internal monolog he it's shown like Oh, he feels like he kind of wants to like assalt a woman that doesn't like fully agree with him and stuff like that. And so I think in the from what I haven't read the book to be completely clear, but a lot of that gets lost in the movie. In the movie, the downfall of their relationship is pretty much like they both lost their jobs and then he was being lazy and she started to resent him, and then it had a diet and the other earth and then it pride them apart and she was resentful because she made him move, or he made her move to Missouri, which would be tough for anyone, especially in new Yoka. was she employed? I was thinking about this, because he was a creative writing teacher at a community college. I don't know that right. She wrote quizzes, like online quizzes or something like that, and then she was also ye to both on she says, personality, quick quizzes and Magazin like that. Yeah, because he was a men's magazine writer, which plays into his, I don't know, masculinity. I guess that would make more sense in the book they also do in the movie. which is kind of weird is that the police and the media are all aware of the fact that, or believe at least that he was abusing her, regardless of if he murdered her or not. They have this journal and like this log and this friend that has vouched for the fact that she's been abused this whole time, and when she comes back after what she presents as being kidnapped and raped, they're like Oh, so you're you're cool going back with your abusive husband, and they're all like yeah, like you're going to go back with the abusive husband, and she's like yeah, that's okay, like what? What? Well, her journals like permissible as evidence, and in it literally the last entry was like I thought my husband it's going to kill me. Yeah, and then they're just like okay, so you're cool going back there. Like are again. The the cops believe the journal to be true and he denied like hitting her, but it seems as though it happened. And as soon as she's backs in, all of the problems in the movie are instantly solved. But I feel like there would still be a lot of like legal implications for them. Yeah, definitely, like she just if the police have evidence of spousal abuse, which is a crime, I don't know how much they're just going to be like oh well, like case dismissed. She's not dead. They would be investigating her murder of Desi callings because that was like suspicious too, and I feel like this movie was done in like, or takes place in, like the digital age, where it's really hard to get away with murder, and I feel like with without even question, she...

...just like goes home and she's like a lot to restart her life just because she was a pregnant woman who happened to be kidnapped. MMM. It's also strange. The other implication there that this is like another kind of small point. But when she goes to live with Desi, which also such a name that just doesn't fit MEO Patrick Harris. But when she does go with him, we already know that she's like a bad person and that she's tricking him, essentially. But even still, he's like pushing himself on to her, like yeah, he's like, you can live in my house for like forty eight hours, but eventually you're going to have to have sex with me. Yeah, and we're we're supposed to be like well, that's kind of what she deserves, which is like a lot of these things. It's just like planting a lot of like anti women, anti victim like rhetoric and narratives kind of even and I don't know, whose fault? It is, like I don't know where it went wrong. I think it was a lot of people made a lot of little mistakes, and this is definitely not their intention, but it ended up being like a movie that's like this message of the movie just being like, well, you shouldn't trust those pesky victims. I think the worst part in terms of what you're talking about, is where he like interviews like the old boyfriend who, like, was a registered sex offender now, because amy's gone from being rape to being murdered. It just a direct example of theoretically saying like how easy it is for women to get away with this and it's like ruined men's lives, as if they would do it in an antagonistic way rather than if they were just yeah, even though subjected the the percent of people that make up rape allegations is so low, and yet this is such a big topic, on the media's attention and on like public opinions attention, because we will always protect our men before we protect our women. Well, this Moni did come out before the me to movement, which is worth the yeah, it's true. It's just like now I feel like there's this whole narrative about like, oh well, you could lose your job over a sexual assault claim, and that's exactly it's an exact portrayal of that, I think. Again, not to talk outside of the PODCAST, but the first time that I showed it to Sophia I kind of brought up what you had brought up, Trent. Of I don't know that this movie would be made the way it was if it were made now, if it were made today. It came out in two thousand and fourteen, so it's not like it's like an ancient and Asian relic, but I would say that things. I don't know that treatment of women has necessarily become better, but I do think that, like, people care more about whether it looks like they're treating women better. Yeah, it's more likely to get called out. So I and the thing that I there's two things that make me not like outright hate this movie. It's is because I think it's well intentioned and kind of horribly misguided in a many ways, because it's written by a woman, which doesn't necessarily mean that she can't have internalized Misogyny, but it's written about a woman and when she wrote the Book and when the movie came out, there were lots of women that were like, I mean, I'm not, I hope to think I'm not, a psychopathic murderer, but there's a lot in this that I really relate to. And I mean the the big one is like the cool girl monolog and and and, and the thing is that is an experience of a lot of women of they're expected to be the you know, like I'm going to smile and I'm going to watch your Adam Sandler movies and I'm gonna I think that's good because it like shows like the escalation of like her tolerance of like men's bullshit, right, yeah, and the thing is that is a I mean again, straight mail here, but like from what I've heard when I've talked with women, that is a thing that exists of this expectation that you will be okay with whatever your man wants and you have to deal with that and I think, I think that Jillian Flynn is trying to comment on something there and it gets lost within what is essentially a lifetime movie. Like it's kind of really well done, lifetime moving, like, I'm not joking, like it's it's a really like, oh, it's a page Turner. You know, it's a really well made one, but it's what ended up being cut out because the book was too long to put into a movie. Just ended up being all the examples of him being a bad person in their relationship and all the examples of her being like appressed in any capacity as a woman, and then we just get a movie that, like him, is the protagonist. I think Ben Affleck needs to be likable...

...for this movie to work, which is probably why those things were curated out, because if he as an asshole and then less people would want to like sit through like two and a half hours where he is like the main subject. MMM, is because he's like handsome and charming, which is commented on. Miss. It's like kind of a vital part of this character. Yeah, and I also think like the second point I was going to bring up is David Fincher, because I think it's a really interesting case where the screenwriter is the same person as the original author of the book, of the source. So so so so. In a lot of cases where a book is being adapted into a movie and you get something it's like, Oh, you kind of distorted the myth, the message to a certain extent. That happens a lot of times when another writer ends up adapting it, because it's you know, obviously it's going to happen. But because of that and Jillian Flynn has is now very successful, has a whole, a whole other show under her belt, a few other movies that have come out that she's written and she has a new she's doing okay for herself. She's not been like Oh yeah, gone. Girl was like, I don't know about that. So that makes me think that she kind of stands by it, which makes me think she still thinks it's a good thing. And the and David fincher has made movies like Fight Club, which many people can disagree on it, but I think at least the intention of that is to is to to del comment on aggressive men because and a toxic masculinity and male to male and male to female relationships and all that stuff, and I I I interpret that as a satire also. That's yaumenting on the absurdity of it and you can you can agree or disagree on the effectiveness of it, but you can definitely see the intent and so I don't think I can understood reading what that's like an understood reading a fight club, although some people are turned off by it if they don't see that angle. And and and. So I think David fincher's coming at this on good terms. But I think in a pre met movement we were more okay with yeah, but like what if she's lying, though, whereas now that's more called to the forefront, like just three years later, especially in that cultural moment that we're in, like watching it when this is central sensitive topic. It makes it, it makes it look so much more blaring, because if that were released today, it wouldn't it wouldn't fly and it would definitely be ridiculed for it's for like it's for one of its messages or yeah, I definitely agree. I don't think that they came at this like like we're going to make a pocket women movie. Yeah, exactly, but like, as someone who is a friend of many victims and am a victim myself, watching this movie genuinely felt like a slap in the face and like like I just don't understand how you could watch it without feeling like nauseous, like it. I don't know. It ended up being like no way no. Was it just that aspect that turned you off to entirely, or did you not like the movie as a whole? I thought the movie was fine as a whole. Like it, and it could have gone in so many other directions as well. But just like the end, I think it's too intrinsically tied to be kind of see, yeah, from that exactly. So you can't. It's such a vital part of the plot that like it doesn't end. There's no beginning and end of like the victim blaming in it kind of like it's kind of thes not like there's the one scene. It's not like there's the one scene with that guy. Like if there was that one scene and you're like, Whoa, that was a decision and then everything else was fine, you can be like not a great scene, but still it's an okay movie. But like the whole message of the movie is like, Hmm, maybe we need to be scared that men will be taken down. Yeah, it's like men being scared of like their privileges taking being taken away. I think the media is portrayed is like a big idiot in this movie too, but I think that's funny and yeah, and and very topical, like with all the news reporter, ladies or like the the specific blond one. Right. Yeah, Trent, yeah, I don't know if you said what you overall think of this movie. Yeah, so I watched this part this movie on your account, parth, on your Voodoo, and so I watched the first like two hours and at that point I was so anxious to see the end. And then I my Voodoo got cut off and then I had and then my electricity was out for like four days and I couldn't watch it until like four days later. So there was so much suspense build...

...up for the last thirty minutes and I was like so amped. I was talking about gone girl all over town. I was like it's the best movie I've seen a long time and the last thirty minutes really like slap me in the phase. I was dissatisfied with the end, I which I think is something we need to discuss. What would you have changed? I thought it ended so abruptly. I don't know what else they would have included to make it less abrupt. How did she get his sperm sample? Like bus that? What's insinuate is that she stole his his his fluid and then impregnant herself with his child. I was going to hold them hostage for eighteen years and he said that he was going to stand by it because he don't want to abandon his child. It was put earlier in the movie that that he had frozen some and in like a sperm bank or something. Yeah, but he like gets the notice in the mail that it had been like properly disposed of. But so it's I I'm assuming that maybe she like I, maybe she or forged that document. Yeah, it's been one of the two. But you she's made up to be like so sinister, but like in a likable way. HMM, I'm so I'm surprised by your take of you really love the first two hours, but then the last thirty minutes turned you off. I just think I had so much anticipation for the first time around because I was like, there's been so many twist and turns, where's this going to end? Because it seemed like when she came home there was still so much left to do, because I knew it just wouldn't end and I just thought it would go a lot further. I was thinking about with this, and this is going to sound crazy, with this movie of work, if, like nick killed a Mey, or is that like taking away the entire premise? I think that that would leave less like to do, because otherwise that would just make it a pretty standard murder movie. HMM. Because it leaves you feeling uneasy. Is the like it's supposed to at least leave you feeling uneasy. The what the first two hours set up. I don't think that it really makes sense for him to murder her, because the whole point is about how agree with it or disagree with it. It kind of does show like, oh, how the media can really like, how how perceptions can be so easily formed against somebody, and so if it ends with him actually doing what everybody thinks he's done, it kind of takes away from that message part. I know this movie hasn't aspect that you love from knives out where it changes the stakes or like the the lens halfway through. Yeah, no, why? I've talked about this earlier with Trent and previous conversations with him, previous private conversations with him, all fair. where I really like it when movies do a thing we're at, like a first act break or midway point, completely change the rules by which the movie is playing, which knives out does, which I mean I don't want to. I don't want to spoil knives out for anybody that hasn't seen it. But but like this movie does it where the first forty minutes we don't know if Nick Killed Amy. I think you're kind of led to believe that he may have. Yeah, and then and then forty minutes and we get the knowledge that, oh, she staged this whole thing, which completely changes it completely changes what all of the tension is and what you are now scared of happening in the movie. I love it when movies do that, and this movie does it like twice, because I didn't expect her to come back, because I didn't expect her to come back like that at least. So then, yeah, I don't know. I thought it was interesting that she decided to come back just because she had nowhere else to go, because she got her money stolen. Neo Patrick Harris was gonna like raper. I thought the plan was to kill herself. I don't know why she didn't do that. My question is, why would she want to kill herself? You think that you would just want to run away and like live her life in Mexico or something I guess she really wanted him to get the death penalty, and for that to happen you have to have a body, but they can track how long a body has been dead for. So I don't so like it. It'd be one thing if she was like planing on killing herself like the day after or something, but she was planning on doing it months down, which just wouldn't really work. Another huge, another huge plot hole I saw is if nick doesn't like go to pebble beach to like think if he wants to get a divorce or not, say, he just like went immediately like to a public place, then he would have an alibi and then he couldn't be tied to the murder, you couldn't be accused of it. Yeah, she really held on to that statement that she was like go somewhere and think about our marriage. Like why did? Why did he take that so literally? I feel like this that this movie is a is a page Turner. It is it is not like...

...it is like really standard kind of trashy magazine material written as High Art, which I think is where like the problems come in. MMM, yeah, if there was one witness, like say in the neighborhood like then like her entire plan is foiled. So I just I I like movies were like every angle of a crime is thought out, and this isn't as thorough as her plan is at the beginning. There are some issues that no one yeah, they try to make it seem like she is such a such that it's the master plan, she didn't make any mistakes, but then it just ends up being like luck. Quite on. What do you think it's? What do you think is the function of like the Amazing Amy Book Franchise, like it as a subplot in this movie? I guess it was the media into her life even before the whole problem it. Yeah, it makes her disappearance like a big deal. Yeah, and it also has affected her like before even their whole marriage. The media has been affecting this girl or woman like her entire wife. And it gives the parents money because like the trust fund being removed as a big deal, and it makes it, I think it ties it in thematically to public versus private perceptions of a person. Hm, because the whole thing is, oh, yeah, like you're supposed to, because a whole big thing is I have to pretend that I give a shit about all of these things that you care about so that we can give the public perception that we are in a happy marriage, so that I could, in public, be like, Oh, yeah, I love my husband and he loves me, whereas privately she doesn't care about any of that and that's not who she is. And that's a huge point in the movie. So I think the books kind of function as that is all that is from day one for her, like like in that one scene where it was like when I stopped taking chelle music, yeah, cello lessons, she suddenly became a prodigy. So it's like changing the public perception of reality to make it better. I also kind of random, but I felt like the movie or the movie The music was really weird, like that week that like weird. I liked the ambi like it. I thought it was like stupid. I'M gonna have to disagree there. I thought it was like nice and Arry and suspenseful, like I don't think there could be like real like like like hey, I don't know, like lyrical music behind it, because it's so dialog driven. I think it just had to be liked to have lyrical music, but it just like the music was so loud and they would use that same track over and over that like dreamy kind of sound or whatever, and I just thought it sounded I don't know, I didn't like it. I thought it was dumb. I gender. I generally like what Atticus Ross and Trent resner bring to the table. I was a fan. All right, let's just sign a rating out of ten. Part you go first. I don't know how to rate this movie. And where does this lie in your David fincher ranking? Below Social Network, below seven, below light club, below Zodiac, Zodiac. I haven't seen Girl Dragon Tattoo and I had. Might be above girl with it. I can. That's all because I think girl with the Dragon Tattoos a little bit. Now, what about Benjamin Button? I put this above that. I like Benjamin Button more than this. Her loves Benjamin Button. I thought it was fun to Mental Guy, but I think, I guess, in terms of how it's made as a movie, probably an eight out of ten. In terms of what it is as a movie, I don't know that I can really rate it because it's like the directions good, the acting is good, the plot turns are good. It's but like I feel like it's a draw message. Oh, entertaining, I think. Yeah, it is impaged her technically high art. Yeah, but so I don't know. I I don't know, Sophia, your thoughts take it away. I I also don't know. I'm feel like I'm bad at rating things in general. I can give it a two out of ten because, like, it theoretically could be good, but, like, I found it deeply offensive. I have not been to send me giving it a too. I have not been offended by a movie like I have been offended by gone girl. I think, ever, like it was so awful you're personally wrong by it. Yes, now I feel has it at about being really supportive of it. I'm going to give it like a six point five. Being that, like, I still thoroughly enjoyed it, but in my David fincher ranking it's just a compliment to him that I love all of his movies so much...

...more, but it's lower on my David fincher list. I'm going to give it a seven or lock it in final answer. I guess the thing it's like for you watching it versus for me watching it, like coming at it as a female, is like I could never enjoy the movie like. It's not like I got the chance, like both of you did, to watch it once and then contemplate later how it was offensive. So it's like I think that as a movie, the idea behind it could be really entertaining, but I was never able to watch it and just be entertained. I was only able to watch it and be like disgusted by it, if that makes sense. Well, yeah, I mean, as a woman, you have more like personal politics in the game and part and I are kind of blind to that. So we're just puppets, baby, we're just the were, the lowest common denominator, just consume and content and support and supporting anything we can get our grubby little hands on. Well, I guess that's the that. That's it for this episode, right. What's the next episode? Parth, tell the lovely people, Trent, did you see a movie that came out earlier this year titled Birds Of Prey? It was the last movie I saw in theaters before the Rona Hit, as I saw in the RU cinema is. It was a matinee. Do you remember Interviewing Evan Shift, editor or CO EDITOR OF BIRDS OF PREY? How could I forget? Well, our next episode is our interview with Evan Shift. He worked on editor BIRDS OF PREY. Work done birds of prey, worked on John Wick two and three, worked on mission impossible for Star Trek. Star Trek into darkness, Star Trek, Star Wars, the force awakens. Bunch of movies. You got a fund Jj Abram story in this one. Tune in next week, guys. It's going to be a wild ride. You to our guest, Sofia parths. Friend you, thank you for having me. Friends, your first woman. This is a major landmark for us. We're going to we're going to try. We're going to try to get some women happy to represent. Yes, now we just need to have ten more male guests before we need another female to meet quota. Well, obviously it's ratio. It's opposite Frat House ratio. All Right, goodbye, bye, fellas. All right, start recording.

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