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Episode 113 · 1 month ago

BODIES BODIES BODIES (2022) with Composer Disasterpeace

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent discuss Bodies Bodies Bodies with its composer, Disasterpeace. They also have a rollicking good time.

Edited by Parth Marathe

We are tonight's entertainment. You can't handle the truth, the fire risals pizza time. You're a wizard, Harry, you know? Do you think that's are you're breathing? Groovy? I don't have friends. Trent, Hello, Karth. It's funny seeing you here. Likewise, it seems like just a minute ago we were doing funny unrelated bits and not recording. But now here we are. I wouldn't know about any of that, but I would want to know about what you've been eating most recently, you know, to be technical about it. I just had half of a rap, a cheese steak rap with lettuce, tomatoes, some spicy peppers, and some some onion. I believe I got it from Crispy Pizza, which is like barely even my third favorite pizza place in New Brunswick, but I really Crispy Guy. No. No, So I've been fantasizing about Jersey Mix all day and my big plan I didn't want to buy it before I had a class in Vorheese Hall, which is right by Jersey Mix, right by the yard where both of these businesses are, And so I was I didn't think that I should buy the sandwich before class. And then eat some of it like it's just in a desolate classroom, like like watching a YouTube video on my phone. And so I made these big plans to get it after and so my class ended at eight fifty and Jersey Mix ended at nine, and so the whole class I was trying to order it through their online ordering system on my laptop, and it seems like I tried to place the order at nine because I thought that they would stop accepting online orders after that, but even by that point it was too late. And so then I had the start for a plan B and you know the rest. What about you, Trent, I think you're gonna like what I have to say about what I've been eating. Um. So I had class today from two to five, and then I had office hours from five thirty to six. But I'd gone grocery shopping earlier in the day with my cousin who works at Target, and so I got some some nice employee discounts. What is the employee discount if you don't mind my asking, It's a ten percent off. And then she also had access to some deals, so like I had off all frozen items. I like deals. Yeah, it's crazy, and our fridge. You haven't been by the apartment in a while, but it was running low. It was it was kind of abominable. Um, and I bought. I bought chicken breasts and then went to class and was thinking about these chicken breasts and what I was going to do with them. And then I realized I remembered my dad. It's um pulled chicken recipe. Mm hmmm, Saute some onions, some garlic, adds, some oil, put in the chicken searut for a bit, put in some barbecue sauce, and then you put in the oven for ninety minutes and just let it slow cook. And then you take it out of the oven and you just like shred it with two forks. And um, you want to know what these what this pulled chicken went into? Was it a pulled chicken sandwich? That's what I would know, No, Trent, though there is a lot left over pulled chicken smoothie close. Um, they went into parts of famous nachos. Really, yes, that sounds like it's bringing your famous nachos to a new level of notoriety. Trent. If you could be here today tonight, you you would have been so happy. You would have been the famous than ever. Yeah. Um, the ironicism surrounding parts of famous nachos would diminish so rapidly. You are also famous for your wings and speaking of known for podcasting, and I am known for podcasting friendship, I'm known for bringing us to the intro? Is that not that you're known for your transitions? That's what will be on your headstone. So how about we just q the intro that actually, like wouldn't be a bad headstone because it'd be like you had a seamless transition into the afterlife, known for his transitions. That's not bad. There worse things to be called. Would you say that at my eulogy? Oh, I won't be attending your funeral...

...super duper busy, you'll be dead or super duper busy super busy? Would you damn you found out I died like not now, but like of old age, and I was like, you were like ninety two. I was ninety one. So that's sweet spot between January and a Would you cry? Would you shed a tear? Why wouldn't I? I don't know. It depends how much contact we remain in over the next seventy years. I think that's considering, but I think there's a good chance of me crying if you died a week from now, A good chance. That's a good chance, good chance, Trent. I would sob if you I found out that you died, Um, And there's the reasons for which is not solely because of Craft Services. And there was a good chance that I would cry if I found out that something that happened to you. Guarantee. Wow, I think I'm going to keep that in the injury, just to let the people know who you really are. Welcome back to Craft Services. Okay, so you're surfing my position. That's cool. A podcast where we talk about the movies. Each week we talked about a film and hopefully have a remember of that film to talk with us about their experience working on the picture. This week we had a special guest named They've got their Man of many names, uh, disaster Piece and rich Rich Freeland part you were there? Also? Did you like the interview? Did you hate it? Oh? Trent, I love this interview, so maybe you're not disappointed at all. But this is our first composer um, and I think it went really well, Trent. Yes, we're finally welcoming the sound side of things and soon part and I will be the creepy sound guy on set that you know, there's always famous creepy sound guy. Or you can be the flirty grip and I'll be the creepy sound guy. I think that fits our vibes, you know. Yeah, I'm just constantly flirting around. But the ladies and boys. Rich Land is too busy direct composing really good scores for some movies like Bodies, Bodies, Bodies or Film of the Week. Then we got Under the Silver Lake, Marcel the Shell and it follows, which all have really good scores. Yeah, and he talks about all of them, and I think, do we just cut into this? Yeah? I think we've said enough. Um let's let's let's let pass Trent and Park take take it away from current, this from like what like two months ago or something so so so backloaded? Who knows so prepared? All right, enjoy this interview, guys, Cue the interview. Hello everybody, and welcome to our interview with rich Freeland goes by Disaster Piece. He's the composer behind such films as it follows, Under the Silver Lake, Marcel the Shell, which shoes on and our film for today, Helena Rains Bodies Bodies Bodies. Thank you so much for being with us today. Yeah, happy to be here. So, just to start off, what would you say your relationship with film was at a young age. I would say, um, I was like going to the movies, UM, but I was always more interested in video games and computers than film. Um. And UM. My kind of career trajectory reflects that because I, UM, after a cup of coffee doing um, graphic design, I decided to switch to music and m kind of integrated that passion with my my interest in video games and got into doing video game soundtracks and did that for probably eight years before maybe seven years before I ended up working It Follows, which is my first film project. Where do you even begin in the world of getting started in like doing video game soundtracks? How do you break into that? For me? I broke into it in a very kind of roundabout way, um, where there was a there was like like I wanted um add on a on a message board. It was actually for this, this this hobby I had as a teenager called the wrestling which is like you, right, you write wrestling fiction basically and you compete against each other. Uh. It's pretty fun, but I used to put my music there. That's kind of how I got my first video game job because there was a there was a wanted to add one of these message boards for UM, a company...

...that was making cell phone games, and it was this was like two thousand and five maybe, UM, so it was before smartphones. So I had to do everything with MIDI files, UM, like music and sound effects. So it's like very it was very strange, but I got paid and I was like, wow, this is cool. I would love to do this like for a living. So after that experience, I started looking into like, you know, how do I how do I do that? And I started finding communities of people who who work on games. When I went to I went to Berklee College and Music in Boston, and UM, there was a group they're called the Video Game Music Club, which I joined and met a lot of like, like minded individuals who were interested in this stuff and UM so we'd hear about you know, events and things going on and UM internships, which I did to game audio internships at college and started going to conferences and I just started like meeting people kind of organically by by putting myself out there going to events, playing shows, releasing music online, um, all that sort of stuff. And so was it off the back of your video game work that you were were you approached to do it follows or was did you want to go kind of in a film route. I was always open to it, but it wasn't really it wasn't really my focus. Um, and it wasn't until David Mitchell, Um, I guess played Fez, this game that I scored and really liked the soundtrack to that that he reached out to me about it follows and so you know, I have I have him to thank for, you know, a lot of my career in film because, um, you know that project catapulted me into other opportunities after that. Yeah, and since then, you've worked on some really cool movies. And uh, we were just listening to it before and talking about who we think you sound like, and we were wondering who you think you what film scores, composers you think you may take influence from, if any, or what neck of the woods musically you come from, or you know, related to I would say that I'm I kind of have my I have a signature kind of thing that I that I do that I couldn't really describe to you, but I definitely have like a sound. Um. But you know, I pull my influences from everywhere. So and I've always enjoyed being a little bit of a chameleon, like just writing in different styles. So my my tastes are very kind of all over the place. Um, you know, film composer wise, there's definitely like a short list of people that I really like, um, you know, people like Bernard Herman. Uh, you know, love good, John Williams, score like anybody. Um. I mean more like modern composers. I really like Johnny Greenwood's work. I really like, um, Miko Levy's work, Marcone, I love Mark Cone. Um. So yeah, I mean those are just something. But like I came to film music late. I mean, you know, I was mostly interested in, um like popular music. I grew up you know an the Beatles and um, Vince Giraldi from the Peanuts, you know, Charlie Brown Christmas yeah. Um, and then you know my you know, my parents were into classic rock and folk and stuff, so I you know, I I picked up that kind of stuff from them, whether it was like Queen led Zeppelin or Joni Mitchell. Um. High school like I really into get to playing guitar, and I got really into tool and Reach against the Machine. And then I kind of graduated to prog rock and got really into King Crimson Metal, and I got really into Mastodon, um, and then you know, had a jazz moment. I got really into impressionism, um. And you know, not to mention, video game music was always a really big inspiration for me too, which in itself is kind of a hodgepodge of other influences, like like kind of it's kind of like, um, a lot of old a lot of a lot of like classic video game music is very much melting pot music. It's like it's like worlds as like just combined. Were there any particular video games that you can point to that you're like, I liked the music and that and that really got me going. Yeah, I mean I think, um, you know, I came I came back around to a lot of that music, Like it wasn't it was something that I'm playing those games as a kid, I didn't maybe didn't think about the music so much. But when I started getting interested in music and writing it, that's when I kind of revisited it and realized how much of an impacted it had on me. UM. You know, composers like Yasunori Mitsuda who did a chrona trigger and chrono cross, um, you know, combined lots of different world styles and really interesting ways. But I mean the big one is definitely Coji Kondo, who also you know, pull lots of influences, you know, lots of influences from jazz and fusion and rock and UM and other styles. UM. And you know that means so much of that music, especially the music that was more limited and capacity, like more limited in what kind of sounds you could use and stuff really required like an elevated...

...level of kind of focus on composition. And I think I I kind of gravitated towards that, especially in the beginning when I didn't really know how to produce music really that well. I could just focus on using a couple of instruments to to write music, and that's kind of how I got my start. So, speaking about our film of the week this week, Bodies Bodies Bodies, how did you become involved with that project? I'm not entirely sure, I think, Um, I mean I had a meeting with Lena. I'm not sure how I got on the radar. But I had a meeting with Lena and we had a really nice, um kind of kind of chemistry. Uh to for like, it seemed like it would be a good, um, a good you know, working scenario for us to work together. Um, it was kind of a time where I was kind of traveling and I wasn't really working, so um, it kind of didn't really go anywhere. And I think they actually went with somebody else and it didn't work out, and then they came back to me. Um and then um uh and then we then we started working together and did this. The rest is history. We did the score and probably I don't know, maybe three months or something like that. So when you first meet a director to talk about if you're potentially going to collaborate, like what sort of materials do they show to like get your vibe on what you would want to do? You know, it depends. I mean sometimes they'll present like if especially if it's like animated or something like that, they probably present a lot of artwork to get a sense of the of the you know, sort of the world of the of the film. Um. With something live action, it's generally you know, they'll they'll send materials either before after the meeting. They might listen to script, they might send a look book things like that, just to kind of like help, you know, help me kind of get a sense of what the project is going to be. Um. Sometimes the meeting is just like a good fit? Like? Do do we seem like we would work well together? Um? You might talk about logistics like timing and you know, is the timing going to be it is the timing good? Or it could just be a feeler to like just kind of touching base and seeing you know. And so you said that, Um, they want with someone else, and then they came background to you. So what was the movie done when you were scoring it? And I guess like how long? I think you said you you worked on it for three or four months something like that. Yeah. I mean the movies, the movie is never done until until until it comes out. There's always things happening. But you know, it was shot and we were they were in post production, and you know, it was fairly far along. But like any project, you know, there's this kind of curve where you know, as you get closer to the end, the amount of progress you make gets smaller and smaller and it and becomes more and more intense, kind of focusing on smaller details. So they were kind of getting into that stage where you know, they were kind of adjusting things, pulling little things out, adding things, um, just kind of playing with you know, the presentation of the film and music is obviously a really big part of that. And was it similar to the other projects that you've been a part of time wise, like in terms of how long you were spending on it? So It Follows was shorter, Um, Marcella Shell was was much longer, and so was Under the Silver Lake. They were both year plus on and off. Um. The The other movie that I did that was similar timeline was this movie Triple Frontier for Netflix. Um. That was also like a couple of months. Um so. But but this film was like not a whole lot of music. Um But I mean I did write a lot of music in trying to get the right sound, and sometimes on a project that's not the case like It follows, I don't there were very few cues that didn't end up in the movie. I think I had to rewrite like two or three things. So there's not a lot of like extra material. But on a movie like Marcella Shell or Bodies, Bodies, Bodies, we're talking about like two x three x the amount of you know, music is what I wrote compared to what's in the film. Um, and that's just because of the circumstances, and you know what people are looking for, maybe how comfortable I am or how hard it you know, how challenging it is to find the right sound or all of those sorts. So generally speaking, when you're writing, are you are you watching the film over and over again and writing in chronological order or just focusing on key scenes or doing whatever jumps out at you first and then filling in the gaps or is it all different. It's a great question. I think, Um, there's there's not necessarily one right way to do it. I have often approached it chronologically. I've been guilty of not watching the film enough. I think I think watching the film is actually really important, especially as you put music into it, to help you like feel out the choices that you're making and that...

...that they're all like contextually working together. Because you could score a scene and as a standalone scene it could work really well, but it might not work in the larger context. Yeah, My my tendency has been to start from the beginning, um, and try to figure it out that way. Sometimes my tendency has been to have a like high concept about what to do and kind of identify like here key moments in the film and like key, I think key moments where things are going to change and maybe the maybe the sound world has to change also, and so I might you know, I might preload, I might like, um, you know, I might like basically work on those scenes first, even though they're out of order or whatever. Do you ever write a song that like makes sense for the film, but you don't actually know where it's gonna go yet, and then it's just some as in it was written for a specific scene, and then you're just trying to slot in where you think it makes the most sense. Or is everything directly inspired by a scene? Yeah, I mean those are two. Those are two very like common and distinctive styles of writing for film. Um. There are definitely projects where you know, you might be asked to write music blind or maybe it's a part of the process that you've come up with, which is too you know, write a bunch of music up front. Um, just inspired by the movie, uh, not thinking maybe not thinking about particular scenes, or maybe you are, but you're not looking at picture. And then either you're figuring it out afterwards, or you know the edit you know, editing team is like is like playing with it and trying to figure it out, or it just doesn't make it into the film, or you get lucky and it fits something perfectly. Um, those are all possibilities. It's an interesting way to work, and it can be you know, it's like people like Johnny Green would do that to a great effect. Um, I haven't really had the opportunity to do that. It's it's really it's a lot of work to write a bunch of music upfront because basically what you're doing is creating a library of music and then handing it over to kind of like try to figure out where to place all of it. And so if you're going purely for bang for your buck, sometimes writing music directly to the picture is going to be a little bit more efficient, even though it has certain you know, there are certain limitations to work in that way. Also, so working on bodies, bodies, bodies, what were the instruments and like software that you are like using to um put it all together and make the music because it's like kind of like an electronic score. It's like a very particular sound. Yeah. So, Um, I have been using logic Pro for a long time. UM So I do all my scoring and logic pro. Yeah. The sound of Bodies is it's a lot of really basic synth sounds, UM, drum sense, bass um like sub like sub like bass style sense and uh certain kinds of effects that create certain kinds of like kind of um distortions and like frequency effects. Um So it's a lot of those kind of three things. Um. And there there's this sort of um there's this effect that basically it makes things sound lossy, like a bad MP three file. And that's another big component of the sound of the film. Um and it's It's an effect that I've had for a long time, and I've never really found a way to use it. Uh So this was kind of the first time, um that was kind of a fun like element um So. Yeah, and it was like, you know, it was definitely I was definitely trying to channel like contemporary music, um you know, like sort of the trap inspired stuff that you hear a lot of these days, and um as someone who's like not particularly interested to that music, it was kind of fun to like try to find something interesting in it. Um So that was kind of that was part of the allure for me. I think as as like a composer. I heard in an interview with the director that you guys talked about TikTok sounds like and like that being an influence on it, and I just thought that that was interesting, and I was wondering how strongly you or even like, like, were you guys like on TikTok and like cataloging sounds or like, how is it that she might have been I wasn't. I mean it, My process is that when I'm occupying a stylistic space, if I have a if I have a blurry kind of quasi ignorant um idea of what something is like, I've generally leaned into that because it's music and you can get away with it and it's it kind of gives it like an interesting and almost impressionistic feel, and that that's what I did, and it follows so I did Onto the Silver Lake, and that's what I did...

...here, which is like I'm inhabiting a new genre that I haven't really explored before UM and kind of allowing it to be wrong um or you know, just allowing it to be what it's going to be and not not being like overly precious about making it very much like oh, this is what people do and this is how they do it. It's sort of just like, oh, I've heard this music kind of music before, so I kind of have like a vague I have like a general sense of it and just kind of like taking that idea and like trying to just keep digging down into that. UM. But you know, there was also like there's also some sort you know, there's some tracks like in the film that are sort of a similar a similar ILK and like those were a part of the kind of the um inspiration like palette for me as well. Yeah, I was kind of just gonna ask exactly that is if like, if you're working on a film that also has like not like nonscore songs, are is that being worked into the equation of how your score is going to work like bounce off of those things? For me? It for me it is I, Um, I care a lot about this, the entire soundtrack and like how it all works together. I mean there are definitely times where you know, there's some source music in the film that it's it's challenging because it's kind of you know, maybe it's clashing or um, maybe it gets changed. And I had written some score to kind of like segue into it in a very particular way, and now it's not working so well. There have been times that I've pull I've really pushed to pull out score, um, because I thought that source material, like source music would work better. UM. And that's actually what happened on Bodies Too. UM. There we had we had been work shopping music like a piece of score for the very beginning of the film when they pull up to the mansion, UM, and we tried a lot of different stuff, and it just never felt quite right. It always felt kind of disjointed and detached from the film. And Um, I was just playing with the edit um and basically tried taking this the song that they're listening to in the car and just pulling and just like extending it through that whole section. And that ended up being the thing that really like solved it and made it feel more um, intentional and not like kind of this mishmash of Oh, we gotta have music here, we have to underline character themes, you know, we have to do all these things. It felt very like ham fisted UM. So Trent and I were both listening to the score before be shut up to the interview, where like, first of all, this is very good, so just a compliment there. But um. Also in the track, the first track, it's like body drop, I think, UM. And the soundtrack there's like the like a motif that happens throughout the film of like a like a that I think UM, And I was wondering, were you trying to come up with a motif that would like be pervasive throughout the entire film or did that sort of come naturally. It's actually an element that I discovered like maybe three quarters of the way into the process, Like it wasn't it wasn't a thing, and then I had, you know, I added it. It was actually based on the rhythm of the theme for B for the B character, which is similar it's like do do do, And I basically took that idea and I just I wanted to create another element that was percussive. And once I came up with that element, I it was sort of like unlocked something for me where I felt like, here's a connective tissue that I can use like throughout the score. Um, that's simple and UM kind of like I don't know how to explain that sound. It's kind of it's like it's like stressful a little bit. Like I feel like it worked very well. It's like it's like it's like needling kind of at your ear a little bit, which I think it's very effective. I guess cool. Yeah, I mean we had one and it follows to um, and this this movie was kind of like horror Kitch, like it was supposed to be sort of like almost like a deconstruction of horror, like because it's kind of campy and it's kind of a joke and you know. Um, so that was like something that we, you know, wanted to try to figure out, and it was actually the source of most of the challenge I think for for the score was like figuring out how to basically write a horror score without it being like overtly like leaning into tropes basically. So this is obviously nothing new for you because you've been releasing music in different forms for a long time, but like the track listings and the track names, m how much I don't want how much thought are you putting into just because I looked at it and some of them are characters names, and some of them are just funny words, and some of them are a little bit more poetic, and I just thought, um, it was an interesting blend, and I was wondering,...

Um, if that's all you or if there's any influence from other people to make it, like, you know, relevant to the story, or if you could name it whatever the hell you wanted, or if the or if you're just naming it as you go, like b theme and then you just leave it the way that you that it originated in your mind. Yeah, it's very it's a very intuitive process. Um. It's something that I kind of have always taken the reins over and and have found to be fun to to to work out. Um, the track, the track listing, like the track ordering and how the tracks flow into each other is a really it's a really important aspect of a soundtrack for me. Um. I spend I usually spend like quite a quite a lot of time figuring out how the tracks all blend together and you know, making sure that they flow into each other nicely. And it's a good listening experience, and it's not just like an arbitrary list of tracks. Um. And then name naming is uh yeah like that. Usually these these tracks they have some sort of like working title sometimes that they're actually multiple cues from the film that I've put together because I, you know, I thought that they fit. There's quite a lot of that actually in the in the soundtrack, because there's a lot of versions of things that aren't in the film that are on the score. Um, because sometimes you write something that you think that's really cool and it just doesn't make it into the movie. So the standalone soundtrack is really the opportunity to kind of like flex a lot of that stuff. I would say, body Drop is just the name I came up with when when I first was like writing for that scene in the film where they start people start dying and they're running around the rain and all that, and it just kind of stuck. Um, it just felt right. Um. Jealousy into Light was another one that I've just kind of because it was kind of based on conversations that I have with Helena about what the scene meant. Basically, when like at the end of the film, when Sophie and b are like in the basement and he tries to run away from Sophie because she's kind of, you know, kind of toxic. Uh. And then like, you know, basically this idea of like basically escaping this sort of like hellhole. Uh. And that's kind of where the Jealousy into Light thing came. And then sometimes I just have fun Like Light into Jealousy is just it's just like an outtake from from Jealousy into Light where I like I went too far, Like I was just, oh, this is really fun. I'm gonna do much of counterpoint. And then I sent it to them and they were like, what we don't understand. I was like, okay, I'll just I'll save that for myself. And then you know, three three versions like doing things with um. The name three times was just kind of a play on the you know, the name of the movie. Yeah, it's a blend Trent. Do you mind if I move into non bodies bodies bodies questions? Yeah you do, thanks. UM. So we've mentioned it follows a little bit, and I was just wondering what that experience was like, um, because it's a very beloved movie and you're first movie, Yeah, my first movie it's like, what an experience. Yeah, it was. It was a cool experience. YEA happened very quickly. Um, we were supposed to have quite a while to work on it. I think three months. We initially talked about a hybrid score with live instruments and since and then, um, the plans kind of changed and we we were shooting for can for the film Festival, and so we suddenly had under a month to do it, and so it was sort of a breakneck pace, Like I was writing every day of the week, Like I was working twelve plus hours on it. Um and wrote the whole score in about three and a half weeks. So, um, it came together really fast. I'm sure you can operate well under that amount of pressure, like you just said, But like in your do you think you like do your best work when like when there's a due date like and it's coming up, or would you have preferred to have like unlimited time or not unlimited? But uh, like do you work best under pressure or like would you have preferred to Yeah, you know it's tricky because um, I I would always prefer to have more time, But there's just something about having kind of a limited time frame where you know, you have to work on this thing where I just i can get really deep into the zone, um, where I'm just completely consumed by a project and I'm just thinking about it all the time. Um. It's not great for your life, but it's good. I mean, it can be good for the project. Um if you can do it in a way that isn't stressing you out. Um, and uh that's the hard part. So UM. Yeah, my preference has always been to work basically like halftime. Like if i can work halftime every day,...

...um, you know, I'm happy, Uh, and I'm like being productive and I'm getting stuff done and it still feels like I'm making good choices. Um. It's not always possible, but that's that's sort of my aspiration. You mentioned working on um, Under the silver Lake and Marcel the Shelf both for like about a year each or you were working on them so that like every day you're grinding and you're like, what's the music for this fucking show? Or like is that like on and off? You're kind of like going away and coming back to it. Yeah, they're on and off, but I mean Under the Silver Lake was more intense. Um, it was sort of like it was like a month of solid work, just kind of putting together turning teeth, the sort of the song of the film, Like writing that song took a while and then and then it was kind of off for a while and then started writing music and like the Spring May Be and uh by by the summer, I was working full time on it, like pretty much seven days a week, and that continued probably for I don't know, five months, six months or something like that. And then Marcel the Shell was like an even longer process because I started working on it in and then with the pandemic, like things got pushed back on the production schedule. Um, and so it was sort of like it took that one took a year and a half, I guess to to finish. Um. But um, it was much more, much more spotty. Yeah, we were talking about like you're I mean, it's hard to to tie down your style and we don't want to. But there's definitely like an electronic side of things. And then I was listening to Under the Silver Lake, which I didn't know you did the score for, but it's fucking awesome, and I think, and I'll know anything about music, but that I think that that's a little bit more like stringy, and then Marcel the shell is like kind of both of those monts at the same time. And I just wanted to know to think out loud and like m am I am, I am, I crazy. No, that's interesting though I hadn't thought of it that way like that, Marcela is kind of a blend. But um, yeah, like I mean, synth, synth is kind of my background. I mean I went to school for synthesis, so I got I got an education and how to do that, um, which really helped me kind of you know, hone those tools. UM. I was also learning how to do production, so I got into you know, I got into kind of like the you know a lot like more traditional sounds. But um, I've generally preferred to do everything myself, UM, as opposed to like working with a bunch of musicians. But you know, there have been opportunities, really cool opportunities to do that, like under the Silver Lake where I got to record for a like a fifty piece orchestra and I got to arrange all those you know, right and arrange all those pieces. Um. That was quite a learning experience for me. It's not something that I would normally do, and it's really really hard. It's really hard for me because you know, I don't have the background for it, so everything just takes much longer. UM. Marcel is all like it's all it's all synthetic UM, even though it kind of has more of a stringy sound UM like you said, but like Under the Silver Lake was you know, strings, brass, like woodwinds like just you know, all all sorts of um orchestral instruments. And when you're working with a fifty piece orchestra like that, is it like when you see in movies where like they have a screen and they're watching it and they're playing over it um or like are you in the room while that's happening or are you just like sending them sheet music and then receiving what they send back. If you're lucky, you get to go to a session and you get to interact with the musicians and you get to be in the room while they record it. And you know, to just to get to that point, it takes quite a lot of steps. I mean, you need to hire all the musicians, you need a conductor, um, you need you know, recording engineers, Like it's it's quite a lot of stuff. Um, So I've always had a team of people to kind of help me facilitate that side of things, which is not because it's not my forte um uh. There are in lower budget scenarios, there are situations where people will record remotely with with live players, um via some sort of like I don't know, maybe they use zoom now, but they traditionally they use like satellite links and all this kind of stuff to like basically phone in or whatever and listen to takes as they're being played and recorded. Um, but yeah, I might. I think the best is to be there in person. It's it's so it's so fun and like inspiring to just hear people play your music like that. It's really cool. And I guess one last like, um, the other thing that you worked...

...on on your IMDb it's shows that you worked on one episode of Adventure Time. That's a cool show. Was it cool to work on? Yeah? That was a lot of fun. Um that's at the animation director of Marcela Shell was the director of that episode. Just in the poor um who also I believe did the Group miniseries for Disney. Yeah. Um so, yeah, that was a really fun project. Um, I kind of had free reign to do what I thought would be fun, and so I just I love the show, so I um just tried to be inspired by that and make something really quirky and eclectic. And I asked a bunch of people to send me samples, UM, and I made the entire score out of other people samples. UM. And that's kind of that was kind of the that was my um my prompt, my creative prompt that I gave myself. Are there like kinds of movies that you would like to write for? Or is it kind of just like you'd like to be approached by interesting people and then kind of just go along tag along to their projects, Like would you want to like a John Wick comes along and they're like right for us? Like, is like an action movie or is it just like I would want to work with this director? Well, it did an action movie and it wasn't my favorite. UM, So I don't know if I would do another one. Even though I like watching action movies, working on them is different. UM. I think generally it's kind of what you said, it's like interesting people, interesting projects. UM. Ideally it's something that's different than what I normally do if it's too similar, like it's I feel like it's it's a waste of time, you know, because I'm not going to be I'm not really having the opportunity to kind of push my boundaries and kind of try something different. So, um, you know, all of that is a component I want. I want to work on things that I think are good. Um, I don't want to work that's that's important. Um at this stage of my career, like financial success is less important because you know, I've been been at it for a long time and I'm like, I'm I'm kind of you know, I'm I'm pretty much comfortable at this point. So that's good. Um. So I can really just kind of hone in on what I think is cool and um uh yeah. And I like to work on things that I feel like have a good sort of like maybe not maybe maybe not a message per se, but like a good they have a good heart, like you know, at the core of it, there's something good there. Sometimes movies, especially horror movies, I don't always find that. Sometimes they feel kind of apid. Um. And uh So it's you know, I want to feel like connected to what I'm working on. It's important to me this this is just a quick question before the last question, because we're we're quickly approaching the big when a question, the big when a final question. But just due to the nature of video games, which you said, we're where's where you got your starts? And you, uh yeah, just since uh like that's it's like not a controlled experience and that someone can like just like walk around endlessly and like it's the music must be cued by something of like if you're just in a certain world, or if you do this thing, or if it's this cut scene, and does that change how you approach it at all? Or is was doing movies and video games like that? Do not think about it in a different way because of like the I don't know the medium, or I guess like the the the nature of it. I mean I I think about it very differently. Um. There are moments in games that are very similar to moments in a TV show or a movie because they're linear and they're experienced, they're generally going to be experienced one way. Um. But even so, even in a game, you have the opportunity to score the same linear cut seen like a different way every time if you really wanted to like you technologically you have that choice, whereas in a film you don't. So you have this really broad possibility space and games to play with the way that music is experienced, and it can be can be very um fulfilling and exciting, but it can also be overwhelming to have that many choices, And so my kind of journey and working on games has been a lot of it has been um trying to find you know, trying to find like where that balances between, you know, not having such a broad possibility space where it's just like crazy amounts of variety that's like overwhelming to work on, overwhelming to understand and test um, but at the same time, like there's so much potential there for creating a really special experience. And...

...people listen to music in a game far more than they listen to music in a movie, So the listener, like the just the amount of music, the amount of time that is spent listening to that music is so much more. You have to think about that when you're actually designing the music for the game, because you don't want people to get fatigued by the music, because that's that's the worst thing, and then people will just turn the music off, which is very common. So um, there's a whole different set of like considerations in music. And I've worked on games where I created the music for them and I didn't write any music. It was all generated just just by coming up with like like a system using coding. Um, and like that's that's a possibility that you can that you can do in a game. So um, it opens up a lot of those sort of things. Awesome, Um, Trent, is it piccona final question time? It's big in a final question time. So the final question is just what's the last great film you watched? And it can be a rewatch or a new release the last great film. We can open it up to TV if it. I just can't think of anything. I've been My girlfriend and I have been going through Naruto and and Burrito because she grew up watching that and I've never seen it before. So um, for quite a while now, we've been slogging through like a thousand episodes of of anime. Um but I like it so well, accept that people like Naruto. I just have one quick final, final final question is movies? What you want to do like for the remainder of your I don't want to say, for the remainder of your career. I'm sure, I'm yeah, I know you're doing TV and video games and stuff, but you've become a force to be reckoned with in the movie composing world. And do you just want to keep keep doing this or is that are you looking for the next thing or or or what? Yeah, um, I mean, movies aren't really my focus. I've just like, I think I've just been fortunate to work on some movies that have been successful. Um uh, movies, I find I find movies really stressful to work on, so I try not to work on too many. But certainly, you know, if something comes along, like I definitely consider working on it. And I'm so, I'm sure, I'm sure that I will continue to work on movies for a really long time. Um. But like right now, most of the time I've spent over the last year has been working on a game. This this this indie game called Paradise Marsh And like in the future, you know, I'm I want to focus on releasing music because I have a lot of music that I haven't released, and I also have a bunch of music software that I want to put out. Um. So you know, I'm just generally interested in making stuff. UM, like, it doesn't have to be a score. Um, although I do like doing that. UM, so yeah, I'm just like, it's more I'm more broadly interested in just creating awesome. Well, thank you so much rich Land, also known as Disaster Piece for coming on for this interview. Um. You can listen to some of his music in movies such as It Follows Under the Silver Lake, Marcela Shell with Shoes on and Helena Rains Bodies, Bodies, Bodies. Thank you so much for being with us. Yeah, thank you both appreciate Wow. Trent, what an interview interview? Really great guy, really nice to us. We're happy he took the time. But Trent, you tied me up for a conversation topic about another interview. Yes, in in this case, we were the interviewees instead of the interviewers. You guys didn't hear this, but um, Trent was like, notice anything part? And I was like what, And he was like anything interesting? And I was like what about my appearance? And I was like what? And this kind of kept happening until Trent said, I've got my goose shirt on. And the backstory behind this is that we Trent and I were invited to go onto a Rutgers affiliated UH podcast entitled What Trent Conversations with Creatives hosted by fellow Rutgers film students like us, Sam Fankl and Andrew Alexander. And we went to...

...there. We went to their fancy We went to their fancy studio for their Halloween episode and their and their season finale. And that's why we were dressed as Maverick and Goose, Pete Pete Maverick Mitchell, Pete Pete Maverick, Mitchell and Goose or Rooster. Who is Bradley Bradshaw? What is? What does Maverick's rank in Top Gun or Maverick both? Uh? I don't remember in Top Gun, but in in Maverick he's a captain. I can't make a joke about it. Pete Maverick Captain, Pete Mitchell. Um. But their podcast is unlike ours for several reasons, yes, um, one of which, as we learned, as we learned the hard way. Yes, well, we were not prepped um for let's say, a tear of language was allowed on the podcast. And Trent and I I think if they've listened to our show, they would have known how down in the dumps. We like to get conversationally speaking uh and creatively speaking, um, conversation with creatives. You know. Um, but we made some curse words. We referenced. No more cuss words. It's violent and dangerous. On their show, we received kind of a stern look from their like adults producer woman when we entered the studio after our long forty minute recording into the I believe it will end up being a twenty five minute episode, and so maybe they'll have some space to cut out all of our curse words and drug and sexual references. And also I asked you to do a karate kick mid episode and you just you you improvised. But um, the episode is worth visiting for those reasons along and there will be visual components, three camera angles, I believe. So if you want to see Part and I in the flesh, this could be a good opportunity, yes, because you have no other opportunities otherwise. Unfortunately, Um, we're just one, We're just ones and zeros to you guys. That's coming out, I believe, Hallow Weekend. And you know what else is coming out Hollow Weekend, Our Bodies, Bodies, Bodies Discussion coming out next week. Guys, Oh, and I could. And when I hummed the first few notes of danger Zone on their show, they they they scoffed in me because they can't because of trademark reasons that they worry about is, if you think about it, the Rutgers as a company could probably get sued, but we have nothing for um. Who who's the artist behind danger Zone? Kenny Loggins? Yeah, I don't think the Kenny Loggins the state is going to come to us and ask for compensation. But in terms of people coming to us, I think that the listeners should come to our social media platforms, give them a follow, go Too Far podcast on any podcast hosting site, Apple Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon Music, where wherever you get your podcasts. I think our listeners should come there and give us a good rating and review wherever possible, and they should come check out our bodies Bodies Bodies Discussion next week. A film that spoiler. Both Trent and I like, yeah, no huge spoiler part and I both like it. Did I say part or Trent? I don't know, but at this at this everyone else gets them confused, so we might as well. Yeah, part, do you know how the last episode ended. No, remember the sneeze you did earlier in the episode and make an edit of it. Well, I did a huge edit of it, like several of them in different speeds, um and like all of them stacked, and the at the end danger zone fades out and then it's just nice like that. So that's just a fun little easter egg at the end of our Nope discussion for any curious party you here parts speaking to edit ends, speaking of ends. Next week is the end of our spook tacular. Halloween is ending, both literally and figuratively if you think about recent movies that have been released. Yes, and next week we will reveal our next mini series. Well we've revealed it already,...

...but we'll reveal we'll reveal well, yeah, so we have coming up, but we will reveal just what exactly that entails. Yeah, for for you people means it means one thing for me in part that means a different thing entirely for you. Yeah, But I think this recording has gone long enough. I think the people need to go about their day, get a life, get a job, make money, go back to the families, you know. Yeah, And with that, thank you for listening. Goodbye bye. Guys,.

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