Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Craft Services
Craft Services

Episode 44 · 1 year ago

BEFORE SUNRISE with Script Supervisor Monika Petrillo

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parth and Trent discusss Before Sunrise with its script supervisor, Monika Petrillo. They may also potentially have a tease of what's to come...

Edited by Parth Marathe

So part what have you been eating? Thanks for asking, Trent. Nice to see you, by the way. You're too kind. What did I I had a Welch's fruit snack pack. You ever had one of those? All the time. I love them so still to this day. Yeah, they're classic. I was in my basement and I was kind of hungry, but not like you know when you're kind of hungry but you don't. You're not hungry, you just want something to snack on. Ye Oh, so like a snack. Yeah, so, yeah. So I was in my basement and on the floor I just see this, this random pack of Welch's fruit snacks. It was abandoned. I was a bandit and my parents don't buy fruit snacks and never really as a kid, which is why they were so origins unknown exactly, and you've scraped it off the floor. I scraped it off the floor and just devoured them with the like a primal beast. Well, a real quick detour about you picking up off the floor. It's reminded me when I was in like fourth or fifth grade, my parents would never buy Sunny D and I really liked it and would you know, go over friends houses to drink it. And one time there was a sunny d underneath Chris Fleming's basement couch and boy did I drink it was good. The memories kind of foggy, probably because that, you know, expired Sunny d did permanent brain damage. They often do. An yeah, everything after that point has kind of been do you think you actually like Sunny D or Did you just want it because you couldn't have it? I mean, like I wasn't allowed like soda and I didn't like that. But there was definitely a taboo factor. It's like I wasn't that into violent video games, but I would go over my friend's houses explicitly because I wasn't allowed to play them at home. It was the same deal with me. So what I would I was working at the restaurant, got a shift meal. It was a Pannini most chicken and it or Turkey. I'm trying to do less red meat because, like, I'm still a bad person, but I'm trying to be isn't chicken white meat? No, it's it was Turkey and Turkey as white meat. Oh, okay, and I'm saying for the reason that I'm trying to eat less red meat for, you know, the environmental factor and how I'm still definitely a bad person, but not a good enough person to, you know, be a vegetarian again. Schn't, you'll always be good enough for me, good enough to start a podcast with. That's kind of you. We wait. You set me up for a great little if you heard of these things called seguays? Yes, it's kind of like a transition. Oh you so you have heard of them. So tell me a little bit about the intro music. It goes a little like yeah, and then, and then we'll cut in right, yea and yeah, I know, I see what you did. They're awesome, and it goes like, welcome back to craft services, our show where we talk about the movie is we have a podcast about film. Each week we talked about a film and hopefully have a crew member of that film to talk with us about their experience working on that movie. This week we're talking about before sunrise, and with us we had who did we have? The script supervisor, Monica Petrillo, and what she delightful, I forget. Delightful, wonderful, intriguing, interesting, wonderful. The Jews that general. Yeah, I think I use that one, but it's okay. It's an overall amazing just like is an awesome person. Yeah, she was. She was really great. She was really nice with her time. She offered up a few other people for us to interview and maybe we'll take her up on that. We'll see. Maybe, but we part don't. We kind of have our hands full. Interviewise like why? I know we can't tease it out to the listeners now. Not yet. Yeah, let's just say currently we have enough episodes lined up till July eighteen to...

...keep you bastard's busy for the next two months. But until then you just have this episode to keep you entertained. But if information is ever leaked about future episodes, it's definitely the end of the episode, because we think the few generous people who are nice enough to listen till the Austro music, they deserve the secrets. But you beginning of the podcast people, strap on your fucking seat belts if you want the the inside information. To everyone who leaves halfway through. Thanks for listening, but also disrespectful. I was going to say fuck you, but you you put it much more eloquently, Trent. But yeah, this was Monica Petrillo. She was super cool she talks about, you know, working on before sunrise, working on shark boy and love a girl. Wait, wait, did you work on spy kids too? End Spy kids three, trunch, she did. I know that's hard to believe, but we were. So the humble viewers at home are going to look at me with the straight face and tell me they don't care about spike kids two and three. Well, we're gonna have to find out, because we could see whether you are listening in our analytics section of our where we upload our videos. Bad News listeners every time. You'll send our show. Get this. We get to see you. So if that doesn't entice you, yeah, guys, we don't actually have cameras in your houses. Okay, I just wanted to clear that up before we started the interview. And here's Monica Petrillo, the script supervisor of our film for this week, Before Sunrise, and I'm going to continue this bit, and now the film projectors going to go off like right, okay, yeah, it's a sound effect that we use, and now it goes off like hello, everybody, and welcome to our interview with Monica Petrillo. She's a script supervisor who's worked on such projects as spy kids two and three, grindhouse and the HBO Show Barry. She also worked in our film for today, Richard Look later's before sunrise. Thank you so much for being with us. My very big pleasure. So, just to start things off, what was your relationship with film as a kid? Huh? So, I actually grew up in Germany, in Munich, and when I was about six I attended a ballet class and one day a lady walked in and was looking for to a little kids to be extras in the back of a TV show, to dancer on in the background or whatever, and I was chosen, and so I that sort of started a bit of a child acting phase of mine, I guess, in Germany. So I was on a couple of TV shows as a kid actor and I found love with filmmaking. I thought it was the funnest place to be and I for a while I thought I wanted to be an actress, but then when things got series and I actually decided what to do with my life, I thought it would be more fun to be behind the camera, to direct. So, with that being said, I read that you moved to the United States and then you started working production jobs and I was wondering what your first job on set was. That's right. Yeah, so I actually started working in Munich. I started on a TV show it in Germany as a script supervisor, because I was told that if I wasn't going to go to film school, that was maybe the best job on set to to learn because you're right next to the director and you you interact with every single other person in the crew and you're right there where the movies being made. So I interned in Germany on a TV show and then ended up doing my first job there and worked on a couple of different movies and a couple TV shows and then I moved to New York when I was twenty. And what was the first motion picture you worked on? The first motion I worked on a...

TV movie in Germany, but the first motion picture was in New York actually as a movie called Quirky, little movie called I was on Mars. It worked out perfectly because it was a German American co production. So it was a great opportunity for me to get hired for the first time in New York with a German director and lead actress and we it was a little Indie, low budget indie movie. We shot in New York and it was really fun and I can actually still praise back every single job I've done since then to that job. I guess it's kind of how the industry were. It is, I kind of how it works. Yeah, so, sort of pivoting a little bit, you worked as a script supervisor and we were wondering if you could explain sort of what the responsibility of a script supervisor are on set offset and sort of what what your job is. Sure so script supervisor is typically the person that spends all day right next to the director. You keep track of continuity. So these, you know, Nice film clubs that people like the watch like, Oh wait, wasn't you wearing a blue sweater and I's wearing a red sweater? Or like wait, they were and through the rain. How come they are in wet, wet, that sort of thing is one of the responsibilities of the script visor to make sure that those combinuity mistakes don't happen. A SCRIPTU wiser also keeps track of all the shots that you make, works together with the director and the DP and how to break down a scene into different shots make sure they can be edited together without crossing the line or like confusing visual things and keeps keeps the actors on track about their lines. That dialog. I also keep notes for the editor, so everything we shoot, you know, gets written down and then submitted to so I it's also kind of a liaison between the director and the editor in terms of, you know, what you shoot on set and then how the director sort of sees that put together in the editing room. So during prep I break down the script into all its individual pieces and that's where, you know, you sort of come up with a connuity line. You make like a day breakdown and you determine exactly when every scene happens and what the connuty and the connection between the different scenes is. So then later on when you do seen five and seen nineteen and seen forty two, you can quickly look up in your own breakdown what it is that you need to make sure happens in those scenes. Yeah, that's pretty much it. You also for a TV shows. It's important as a script revisor you time the whole script beforehand. So let's say you have a thirty minute show. That's means it's supposed to be twenty eight and a half minutes long. And so if they have a script that already in pre timing times out to be thirty eight minutes or whatever, then that could be a problem down the line because then they have to cut out things that really hold the story together. So it's important to time the script beforehand during preproduction and then you know alert the director to, for example, if it's too long or too short, and then as you filming, you kind of keep track of it to each scene how long it is. Does that makes sense? Yeah, yeah, very much so. pivoting forward to our topic of the day, how did you get involved with before sunrise? So before sunrise, I think was was in ninety four, so that's twenty s Folt, twenty seven years ago, and I as I said, everything goes back to that first job I did in New York. Lee Daniels, who was first assistant cameraman on this little movie I did in New York, had started working with Rick Link later. He's they're both Austin and they had done days and confused together and so when I went to Austin the first time to work on another little low budget indie movie pulled love in a...

...forty five, I met with Lee and we had a beer together and he said, you know, you should really meet Rick because you speak German and he wants to do this crazy movie next that he wants to shoot in Austria and they're going to be a lot of people speaking German and it would be really helpful to have somebody who can speak both languages and you should hire you. And so I met Rick and we kind of hit it off and so you know, couple months later I found myself in Vienna working on before sunrise. So what kind of a relationship did you and Richard Look later have in terms of how often are you communicating and that sort of thing? Well, we communicate a lot. I mean generally the director and the script to rerovisor communicate frequently, constantly on set. You, like I said, you sort of tend to sit next to each other and kind of, you know often, and know in a good relationship, the director look over and just kind of see for you give them the nod and or you go up and say if there's a problem. So was rick and me. We we did like each other a lot and I thought about it after you guys asked me to do this interview. I actually just rewatched the movie last night with my daughter, which was very fun because it's been such a long time and I now have a eighteen year old daughter myself. So it was very fun to watch this movie again from a different perspective. And then I thought about it and I realized I think rick and I both learned some key things during the making of the film. I learned from him. So I was at that point in my career. I was it was early enough that I had just sort of gotten good as a script supervisor in terms of catching mistakes. But what I hadn't learned what I now consider fifty percent of my job, which is to have the right diplomacy and the right how to bring it up. HMM. And so rick is extremely laid back. He's he does not like stress or anything. You know, he's very cool, lay back. And when I initially, when we started working together, and I would go up to him and I would say like look, break, this is never going to cut together. They're they're saying something different every time and they're they're, you know, doing something different each take. How do you want to act like? I was very panicky like that, and he just shut me out, like he just wouldn't listen like you would just turn away and yeah, I don't worry about it. So over the course of that film I really learned a very important lesson, and that is that it's only half of the job. is to catch the mistakes. The other half is to learn how to communicate it, you know, because ultimately a script supervises job is basically to tell people that they're doing something wrong. Right, yeah, like they're messing up right now all the time. Right, you're like, Oh, you didn't say a line right to the actor, or like Hey, you put the wrong costume on to the costume person. L Hey, we you know, we cross the line here, and nobody likes to be told that it doing things wrong. So you got to kind of learn how to you're like a parking attendant, like you never deliver good news right exactly. And so I think, I don't know if Rick knows this, but I think he really taught me during that movie how to do that. So instead of so by the end of the movie, rather than what I just described to you, I would go to him after like Pake two and I'd be like Hey, rick, so you know Ethan and Julie. They are kind of have a little variety and what they're doing. You might want to sing. Maybe an addition to the overs, maybe we should also get some singles, because then you can just cut it in any way like that just sounds very different, you know, and so I think I'm very grateful to him. I really learned that in the course of this film and on him. On the other hand, he told me later on, because we ended up doing two...

...other movies together, and he told me later on. He said, you know, I really learned a great lesson from you that film, and that is that he didn't, you know, initially he didn't listen to me, and so he's like then I got an editing room and I realized, like best Improv is not good if you can't cut it together, because if it makes no spatial sense or anything, well, if it's just, you know, if you have two people talking and you only cover it into over the shoulder shots and they're both in both shots and they're in completely different places each time, then you can't cut back and forth. And so yeah, so I think we both learned something from each other. It was nice. So, with that being said, with like the differences between takes and how there's a little room for Improv I feel like as a script supervisor, how do you like if something good is happening on the day? How like is there times when it when it's allowed to make the final cut? I guess if it if it doesn't, you know, create a plot in trivance or something like that? Sure, sure, I think ultimately I've learned that, like there are things you can get away with, there are some you kind of have to know what you cannot. What what what's important, like, for example, if somebody turns around right, they walk away from you and then they turn around and say one more line, if they turn over their other shoulder, that there's no way to cut around it. Like that's a very important one to get right. But then they are little things like if somebody, you know, took a drink from their water at a line later or line earlier, something that's easier. You just means you cut one line later. You know, that's not that big a deal. And I also learned when I when I work on Silicon Valley. I don't know if you know that show. Of course we do. Yeah, so that was a big learning curve for me about Improv because there we had like six guys will all Improv masters and I learned that if somebody's really good at Improv they have like their feel down and you could they could repeat the same Improv. So that's the the main difference. You know, if an actor isn't just randomly doing something completely different on each take, that's hard. But if, if, if actors know, like the good ones, they will say in the same space and just say a different line and then they were remember or what they did and they can repeat it when they're you know, the opposite actor is when it's their take. So does that make sense? So right. I was going to say, with Sun rose being a all in one day movie, did that make your job easier or harder? Well, made it easier. With regards to costume, you know, as you may notice, they basically wear the same clothes, except Ethan changes after the train train he realized that wearing a red turtleneck was a bad idea because it was way too odd and July and Austria. But then, since we filmed this movie was unusual in the sense that we filmed it almost entirely in sequence. Like that never ever happens. But break that was very important to them because they wanted to develop the relationship and the story sort of as we will filming it to some degree, and leave room for the ability to refer back to something like you might remember at the end Ethan or Julie says to Ethan, I think. Oh, by the way, we never went to that. Those guys play, you know this the cow show the cars honest to see it. Yeah, and so there if we hadn't shot that, other seen before, because those guys kind of made all that up, then they added that line in later. Yeah, and with regards to it taking place all in one night, that was also highly unique. So, because most of it is all at night, we basically filmed the movie for four weeks or five weeks at night, which made it wonderful. Like if you're in Vienna, I like July, the night is only eight hours long, and so we had this...

...challenge that to fit all this work into eight hours, and so we had a very unusual schedule. We would start at six PM and we'd all meet and we rehearse the entire night's work and lay it down marks for every single scene, everything. Then we would eat dinner and at nine PM, when it was finally dark, we would film all the way until thirty or whatever, this sun would come up, so we didn't have the usual twelve hours of shooting time that most movies have. We only had very little, but we kind of like just powered through at that point and I have the most amazing memories of biking home. I borrowed a bike from somebody and like biking back to the hotel at five o'clock in the morning when the sun riot rose and Bienna and, you know, seeing the garbage trucks and like going back home. I'm back to the hotel, the sleep. It was very yeah, it was a very memorable experience. Well, I was going to ask is what was there any improvisation on set for this movie, because I I feel like it seems like a pretty to the script movie, but I mean, I don't know what the process was on set. Well, they they were, and Ethan, Julie and Rick were working on the script constantly, like they as we were working. They kept changing things and adapting things and there was some amount of Improv but they had sort of the points, you know, during I mean it was a script and they did as long as they stuck to the sort of main points of the scene then that that work right. So there was only within within the within a certain frame. That was improvisation. I know it seems very improvised. Even my daughter last night I like I've been making all this up, but I was like no, that's just good acting. So being as I'm sure you saw last night, the there are a lot of like really good long takes, like the walk and talks, and I'm sure I mean just because it covers so much ground. I would imagine like getting permits for that could be complicated. Or was wondering if they're or if they were stolen shots or if it took a bunch of takes. Very curious. So it depends. I I don't know for sure about I don't think there were any stolen shots. That nothing I was aware of. But yeah, they had permits and we we would rehearse the whole thing. I remember rehearsing a great lengths to see how long like a walk and talk would take. For example when they walking along the river and then they end up right next to the poet who says like Hey, hey, you want me to write you a poem? That obviously had a time out so that they get to that point I remember one other thing, that the infamous fairy ferris wheel scene where they kiss. You know, that's sunset, of course, and the first time we shot it we didn't get the whole scene because the ferris wheel stops and they had an accountant for that. It's a that big bear as wheel name, you know, and get to the top and you stop and then it kept going and it stopped again and like we had to wait until we were back at the top and then it was too dark because the Sun said only last ten minutes or something. So we actually ended up were turning at dawn one day to shoot the remainder of the sunset scene. I feel like the beginning of the movie shot on a train, I mean just because you're constantly looking at the window, would pose a unique challenge for for background continuity. With, yeah, without the case. That is the case, and I I mean watching, rewatching the movie last night, I noticed it. I'm sure not many other people noticed that as much, but I know the editor had a real challenge editing that scene because of the background and the we shot that in between Vienna and Salzburg, so the train just goes back and forth there and you know this not only the background but the speed the train was going was varying, and so I think that was a challenge for the editor. When you had to like reset a shot, did you like have to go back to the place where you...

...were out? We gonna we were in a regular train, like it's not a train that was only for us. It was a train that was like going regularly between Vienna and Salsburg. So the train wasn't stopping for us at all. We just had we had, it just kept going, and so that's why the background just was whatever it was. So how many trips you think you took back and forth in order to get all the train stuff? I don't remember. I feel like we shot I feel like we shot maybe two days on the train and the beginning and there was one more day at the end when Julie gets on at the end, because we weren't going to shoot that at the beginning. That had to really beat the end. So, other than obviously the aforementioned fairsal scene and the train stuff, do you recall any scenes that were like really difficult to like get through or to get done? Specifically, I remember being really excited when I see that you know there's a scene in the tram when they going, when they just sitting in the back of the tram and they're talking the whole time. And so I don't know how if you know Vienna, but Vienna has basically a road that's called the ring that goes all around the center of the town and there's a tram, this street car that goes basically in a circle. So it was perfect Ross. I kept going in the circle and we were just sitting in the back of the tramp. And that one we were all nervous about because you had no way. There was it was no way to they didn't want to cut it. It was supposed to be all one take and I think we had maybe a limited amount of time to get that. But we did it, I think two times or three times, and boom, it was great. So we were all very excited. How while that worked out, I remember that, speaking of your work with Richard Link, later we saw you were listed as additional crew on boyhood and we were wondering what work you did on that. Oh so boyhood, as you may know, was shot over the course of twelve years and so each year they shot just with whoever. You know, they basically hired a crew for three or four days to shoot that year's worth of material. And one year I happened to be in Austin because I was working with Robert Rodriguez on a movie, and so they hired me one year when I was in Austin. Which period of the movie of Boyhood? I think it was the fourth, fourth or fifth year. I can't tell you any more exactly which he was. I like the you know, the boy was. Maybe he was a young teenager. He was like twelve or so. That's what I want. So I'm glad that you brought up Robert Rodriguez because we wanted to talk about your other work with him. If you could speak on spy kids two and three, those are childhood classics, I would say point in love a girl. Yeah, you've really struck an emotional core for war. We were the target audience for that. Oh, that makes me. I did you guys see the new one? We can be heroes. I did SNAW. We saw that. You worked on it though. Yeah, yeah, that has a lava girl as a grown up. MMM, this is so tell us you got involved with Rebert Rodriguez and how one led to the next. So well, I was actually working with Reke link later on the Newton Boys in Austin and Rick and Robert our friends, and so one day where our came by the set to visit and rick introduce me to him, and so that's kind of how I met him. And so then when he did spike it's to, he was looking for scriptwizer. He hadn't yet found a script of wiser he was happy with, and so he asked me to come and I thought that sounded great. So why? Yeah, so that's how I started on spike it's to, which was super, Super Fun. Yeah, so how did your relationship with, or like how different of a director is Rubbert Rodriguez, because he seems like he'd be kind of a different style? Well, that's a good question, I would say. So I've actually worked with all three Austin Directors,...

Robert Rodriguez, Rick Link later and Mike Judge. They all three out of Austin and the thing, interestingly enough, the thing that all three of them have in common is that they are all basically introverts and very quiet, shy men. HMM, Rick is? Yeah, they they're all very mellow and and so the their style of filmmaking is very different, obviously, and yeah, Robert Works very fast and sort of has everything in his own head and if he could, he would do it all by himself. But yeah, I think Robert and I have done now seven or eight movies together and we we've gotten a good form of communication, like a lot, and we here can understand each other really well and I know his style and yeah, total what else they Robert Likes to work with the same people, so that's that's been really nice. At over the fifteen years or whatever we work together, it's basically been the same crew, more or less. So on set, is would you say the most common errors are catching or they dialog based? Is it item shifting around on a desk? Is a wardrobe like? What is a and like? What's like you're your pet peeve in that regard, or what seems to keep coming up? It's very different and totally depends on what the job is. You know, it depends on the actors, it depends on it could be any of the above. I think the my asking for my pet teeth. The thing that bothers me personally the most is when a director or D Peek process the line like that. Is really like that, because I think that's something in the audience. The average audience doesn't know. They don't understand why it looks weird or different. It's just disorienting to them. So it's like a visual rule that you know. People don't people don't know. They just look at it. They feel like somehow it doesn't feel like they're connected or they're not talking to each other, but they don't know why. So I yeah, that's something that bothers me. If people I have worked over the years, I've worked with people who just say, like, Oh, who cares, everybody knows where you are in the room, and I disagree. Right, is hair a difficult thing to keep track of, because I feel like I always watch movies, and I mean obviously you're shooting this over sups, like you could be shooting a scene over a couple weeks. So like hair just seems like a very difficult thing to keep track of and I always notice it when I watch a movie. Oh, that's interesting. You mean like the lengths of hair? Yeah, I mean like like length of hair and like how it's I don't know, like set up sort of, because lots of times in like a shot reverse shot, you'll see like, oh, that was done with two different takes. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, that that that. It can be challenging kind of depending on the hair that you have. Obviously I've worked, when I've worked on long TV shows where you have to come in and regularly trim people's hair, but trim it just a little bit, so it's not from one day to another it's it's drastically different. Or women often have hair or the oh that it's like in front door and back and and that's where really good hair person makes a big difference because they are watching the monitor and they paid great attention and they'll have in when they see something. Or even I mean actors, the most professional of actors. They know how to sit so their hair doesn't fall forward over it's and this is again sorry to keep harping on the hair, but when, when like a man or something like, they have like stubble or something, does that mean that like the makeup department has to like or like hair stylist whoever, has to like really carefully like make sure it's the same length, or you sort of like sure, sure, I mean I've worked on, you know, on Sin City, where we had to just they try to schedule around that. So if something, if an actor has a stubble part of the movie and not a stubble any other one, then they obviously try to schedule it so that all the stubble scenes are hopefully together. But I mean now and then you can't...

...do that. And then their hair makeup people have to put US stubble on like basically blue it on and try to match it. Oh Wow, you glue. Oh Man, that's yeah, for sure. Thin you can't wait two days for the stubble to grow. So nowadays, in your daytoday life, just like watching bad TV and stuff, are you like hyper focus to find? I'm sure like you're not going out of your way for it, but do you accidentally find yourself noticing the continuity errors? Well, people ask me that a lot. I am sure. The truth is, if if a movie is good, if a TV show is good, I don't notice the mistakes, I don't notice I don't notice wardrobe or makeup or such mistakes. I do notice when they cross the line. That really bothers me. Like it just it's jarring to me and it annoys me and it bothers me. But the other stuff doesn't what is good. You know, people, good performance will always trump any kind of little wrong. Yeah, something missing or yeah, so you spoke about working on Silicon Valley. I just was wondering how you got involved with that. Was that just another Austin connection or that one was actually not an awesome connection? I had kind of remember I had just finished working on some movie. Can't remember, not which one, but yeah, and they called me and brought me into interview. And but the thing that I remember from that I met Mike and Alec Burg for the interview and Mike was, as I said, he's a shy man, and he said to me like, look, I'm supposed to interview but honestly, I don't really know what I should ask you like, and so I told him said look, I personally think for a director to choose the right script supervisor, there's one thing that is more important than anything else, and that is, can you imagine being next to this person for a long time and sitting next to them without being completely annoyed? And he laughed, and I think that's going to be higher. But it's true, like you don't want to sit next to somebody who either talks too much or not enough or who was kind of got bad brass or is annoying or keeps whatever. So yeah, a big part of your job descriptions is being tolerable, like over a long period of time. Exactly. Yes, you got that right. So I try to be tolerable. So I saw you worked on two episodes of the Mandalorian as a second unit script supervisor and I was curious about that. Yeah, that was just a few a couple days where I went in for a friend who who? Yeah, they had second unit. It was fun too. I mean I saw the little baby, the Little Green Baby, sure, and and it's a lot of visual effects. So I was on stage with blue screen and was exclusively on stage with blue screen. One day I worked actually Robert Rodriguez directed one episode and which was Super Fun because they needed second you know, on that day. So I got to see him and we shot actually out in Calabasas, in the in the that rocky area over there. We shot a fight between stormtroopers and some other people. I actually don't know much about Star Wars. It's all good. Going back a little bit, you were uncredited on zoolander and that seems like an interesting movie. Of what happened there to be uncredited? Oh, I actually I didn't know. That's how they noticed it. I just did a day. It was additional photography. Yeah, they needed to do that. Wasn't just after the movie was finished. I just went in for a day. So looking forward, on your IMDB it says you will or have been working on Avatar two and three and I was wondering what's going on there. So if Disney...

...doesn't have a sniper rifle currently pointed at you in case you reveal spoilers? Yeah, speaking very vague terms, very vague, I also just did second unit on that. So they've been filming both Avatar two and three simultaneously for the past couple of years. It's a long, long project and it's entirely filmed, you know, it's like filmed on stage and with using motion capture and and then they've shot in New Zealand. But I wasn't part of that. So I just did. I've worked repeatedly at doing second unit on on stage and in a in a large tank where they were filming in a tank, and it's a very different movie everything you know, because it's motion capture. There's there is really it's not the traditional kind of filming actors. It's all that. Actors were censors and basically there, yeah, their motion get captured and then it's the rest is computer generated. So I was looking at your work outside of the script department and it said in two thousand and six you had a film called fly boat and it like showed it south by southwest. And can you talk? Can you speak on that? Yeah, yeah, so I've, like I said, I always, you know, was also looking to directing and wanted to direct, and so I made a feature documentary and two thousand and six will fly about, which is about it trip I took ice I. Basically I got a pilot's license when I was twenty four out of a crazy idea, and then I circumnavigated Australia together with my dad in a says no one hundred and seventy two and I made I just took a camera and film doll thing and then spend a number of years editing, and so that became the documentary fly about, which, yeah, I did went to it did go to south by southwest. It premiered there and it ended up being on TV and outs on Amazon prime now and it's had kind of a long life already. was doing the documentary the inspiration, or was it just like, I'm doing this and I'll record it and then you had a bunch of material and you started editing? You mean, was it that was was inspiration? That good to go on that? Oh, what happened for us? The trip or the movie, as in, what was the first idea? To do the tripper, to do the movie about the trip? So I had wanted to make my own film for a while already, and then, unrelated to that, I decided today that I wanted to get a pilot's license. And once I had license and my dad and I decided to go to Australia and fly there. And then one day I just realized, wait a minute, this is why don't I make a movie about this? Like I have no idea what's going to happen, but this is bound to be interesting. When you go down under an you fly a little plane and who knows what's going to happen. And so it it was more like somebody was pointing a big Red Arrow at me. It's it like this is it. Here's your movie that you gotta make. Sure. So, so, how long did the circumnavigation take and I'm sure there were like some windy and windy moments along the way. Yep, there were definitely many moments. So we flew. It took us four weeks to circumb. We went literally around the circumference of the continent and flew seventy two hours, I think. In all, they were definitely hairy moments weatherwise, but also what ended up happening, and I least expected that, was that my dad and I actually had some some personal conflict. I was going to say that's a lot of small talk to me. Yeah, it's well my yeah, so he also had gotten a pilots license after I I did, because he sort of...

...after I got my license, he felt really envious and said he always wanted to do this and this was always his dream in life to get a pilot's license. And so he'd got one two and then we thought like Oh, we'll just go to Australia and, you know, be co pilots and switch off. But the problem was neither one of us was very experienced and so, and I'm not a flight instructor. So that caused some issues in the cockpit because I ended up taking the wheel from him a couple times and that didn't go so well with the father daughter dynamic. And but you'll have to watch the movie to see what happened. I'm sure it was good. You know material. Yeah, it's yeah, I mean I went down when I first left. I didn't know much about documentary filmmaking at the time and so I just watched a bunch of documentaries before I went as an inspiration, and one of the films that I watched was Sherman's March, which is kind of a classic, and that kind of inspired me to just take the camera and sort of turn it around on myself. And it's kind of people now that watch it say like, Oh, you kind of well one of the first people to do a Vlog, basically, like I took selfies before that was a word. And I also learned from watching province March that you don't always like you might set out to make a film about something, but then life happens and you realize, oh, this is really about something else. So when I first return from Australia, twenty five hours of footage and I thought, oh I was I went down there to kind of find myself and have this spiritual revelation. And well, that didn't happen. It was very different, and so the film ended up the coming about what happens when you don't find what you set out to find. What did you learn? It said. Well, I think, Trent, should we ask the big the big KAHUNA. So I guess, Barring Before Sunrise, as you were so nice, to re watch. What was? What's the last great film you watched? The last great film I watched? Okay, so I will say one of the my greatest favorite movies is hunt for the wilder people. Oh, that's an awesome movie. Yes, and and my whole family loves it and we have watched it several times and we've even watched it while we were driving around and Zealand and an RV. And when I join the Mantalorian one day I got to work with Taiko Watiti, so that was really awesome, really, but UN for the little of people is everything I think a movie should be. It's funny, it's creative, it's it's quirky, it's human, it's visual. I love it. Well, thank you so much for coming on. Yeah, she is Monica Petrolo and she's a script supervisor on. You know, Spike, it's two, three and grindhouse and Barry and Richard Link Lads, before sunrise. Thank you so much for your time. Thanks so much for chatting with me. It's been really fun. Thank you. parth. Was Not a delightful interview? I know I enjoyed myself. I had a good time as well. Trent. Yeah, no, that was a great interview. Thanks again to Monica Petrilo. She was awesome. Do we have episodes coming out after this or I was just going to say it. I mean Monica Petrillo. She's a group supervisor and to any of you kids paying attention at home, we may have you mean there was a little mention of the departed. Think about that. Well, maybe you have to think different. You know, try it part. Yeah, but next what come? What happens next week, because the depotted is kind of far away. Yeah, next week we're going to be having well, try and why don't you tell me who we're discussing before sunrise with? I hear we're just...

...having some random woman with us. As you know, when we're discussing films, we like really to spice things up, and you know it's not it's never good to have a podcast where three men are discussing something and taking themselves seriously, and so we want to get into the nitty gritty before sunrise. So we're inviting on a local woman. You know, they have they have feelings in perspectives, and we're going to find out today. Have a name or no? Or is that not a thing we do in America to be announced? Yes, it there's a mystery female who will be on the show next week and you stay tuned to find out who that might be. She has two x chromosomes. That's all I can say about that. Well, you heard Trent. That's that's about all we can give you guys right now. So to all of you guys that made it to the end of the episode, you know you got your you got your teas of what's to come, but thank you again to Monica Petrilo. Way We should tell people, I mean because if you've come this far, you clearly you like us a little bit. So what you should do is you should write a review on Apple Pottons. Yeah, I've heard that's a thing to do. I just think you should. I would, I would, I would really appreciate it if you gave us five starts. That's all I'm trying to say. I'd be happy if you gave us like five stars, wrote a little something, something for us. You know, if you could give us some words, some positive reinforcement, we'd really appreciate it. Guys, maybe follow our instagram and our twitter. You know, it's like thanks. It's like we're nearing fifty episodes. We've done a lot for you and you know, scratch our backs a little and you know, we've teased out a few things, but maybe our fifty episode will be a special interview part. I don't even know what I'm talking about and I'm a host of the show, so let's end its end the pod so we can discuss it off air. Were these little people mitis nerve? Listeners can't hear us? Yeah, all right, good bye. Time. Is it dumb? Is it time? All right, by guys, thanks for listening to our podcast. We really appreciate it. Or we love you all. Yeah, despite insulting you constantly,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (120)